Keith Campbell: To protect jobs, we must protect the ocean

Since childhood, I’ve had the good fortune to gain an intimate knowledge of one of our nation’s greatest treasures. Through countless hours spent exploring the inlets and creeks of the Chesapeake Bay, I’ve gained a lifelong appreciation for this remarkable ecosystem and an undying commitment to protect it. As an investment manager for 40 years, I can also say that healthy coastal regions are not just pretty pictures; they are critical to sustaining a strong economy. (Balt. Sun)

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Rascovar: Democrats crowd governor’s race

Given Republican Gov. Larry Hogan’s widespread popularity, it is difficult to grasp why so many Democrats are jumping into the race for chief executive of Maryland. In the past week, state Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County formally declared and in a totally unexpected move the wife of U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, Maya Rockeymoore, said she wants to run in the gubernatorial primary, too. That’s in addition to technology innovator Alec Ross,  Baltimore lawyer Jim Shea, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker, U.S. Rep. John Delaney, former NAACP President Ben Jealous and former Attorney General Doug Gansler. (Md. Reporter)

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Cutting costs of new schools could be simple

Washington County Board of Education member Jacqueline Fischer called it the ugliest building she had ever seen. And that summed up our thoughts as well after we recently got our first look at the architect’s exterior rendition of the new $23.8 million Sharpsburg Elementary School slated to open in August 2020. The proposed 59,749-square-foot complex is a mishmash of what resembles a barn, a nondescript building with abstract blue-and-white panel siding, a picnic pavilion and a prison with block exterior walls — all cobbled together into one disjointed complex. It doesn’t resemble any school building we’ve ever seen — at least not from the outside. (Herald-Mail)

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John Waters: Closing of City Paper leaves film community bereft

What a sad fact to hear that the City Paper is going to cease publication (“Baltimore Sun Media Group to shut down City Paper,” July 7). Now there will be nowhere for local critics to promote or review new films in any newspaper in the city of Baltimore. The Sun hasn't had its own film critic for years, and, as the film community continues to get bigger and better in Baltimore, the City Paper will not be around to cover it. I have read the City Paper since the very first issue. Sometimes they liked the things I did, sometimes they didn't, but they were always fair. (Balt. Sun)

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July 21 // Donald C. Fry: Pass a tougher illegal handgun law in city

There’s been a flurry of recent activity from Baltimore’s elected officials and citizens launching initiatives aimed at helping to stem the shootings and killings that have literally spiraled out of control. Not all of these efforts will be adopted, but they are an indication that the frustration level has peaked. (Daily Record)

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Baltimore police's integrity problem

Let’s accept, for the sake of argument, the most innocent possible explanation for the Baltimore police officer whose body camera footage appears to show him planting drugs in a trash strewn alley that he “finds” shortly thereafter. Let’s consider the additional context that Commissioner Kevin Davis provided — that the three officers seen in the video were working in an area known for drug dealing and observed an exchange. (Balt. Sun)

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Noise seems far down on FAA's priority list

BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport is the country's 23rd busiest in terms of passenger traffic and is a dynamo for local and state economies. We're sure county residents are fine with this. But some of them are now wishing they weren't being reminded of it quite as noisily and relentlessly. (Capital)

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July 20 // The Purple Line, resurrected

A federal appeals court on Wednesday appeared to resurrect what would be the Washington area’s most important new transit link since the Silver Line — the light-rail Purple Line, which will connect Maryland’s close-in suburbs — by lifting a stay imposed this spring by a fuzzy-headed federal judge. The appeals court’s order gives the state of Maryland a fighting chance at reclaiming $900 million in federal funding for the Purple Line that was blocked at the 11th hour by U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon. At last, judicial common sense may revive a critical project nearly derailed by Mr. Leon, who ruled this spring that state and federal officials hadn’t seriously considered the potential effect of declining ridership on Metro, from which the new light-rail line expects to draw many of its users. (Wash. Post)

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