Marc Elrich: What development should look like in Montgomery County

The June 6 editorial “Why Mr. Blair makes sense” claimed I had “declared [I]’d rather divert jobs to neighboring Frederick County than attract them to Montgomery” and asserted that I am known “for opposing development projects of every description.” Neither is true. I said that if people who bought houses in Frederick had jobs in Frederick, Interstate 270 and other roads would be less clogged with long- ­distance commuters. I don’t take the insular view that for Montgomery County to prosper, other parts of the region cannot. (Wash. Post)

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Barbara Babb, Gloria H. Danziger: Officer's murder highlights Baltimore's truancy problems

The tragic death of Baltimore County Police Officer Amy Caprio shines a glaring light on the critical need to tackle school truancy, which is often linked to crime. The Baltimore County State’s Attorney has charged four Baltimore City teen boys, ages 15 through 17, with her murder; she was run over during school hours on a Monday afternoon last month. According to the Maryland Report Card, in Baltimore City during the 2016-2017 school year, 21 percent of elementary students missed more than 20 days of school, and 23 percent of middle school students missed more than 20 days of school. Not surprisingly, that number escalates when young people reach high school. (Balt. Sun)

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Pride cometh before the flooding in Ocean City

This week, Rep. Andy Harris, a Republican who represents Maryland’s 1st Congressional District including the entire Eastern Shore, issued a press release to let his constituents know he was proudly standing in the way of offshore wind power. Specifically, the Johns Hopkins-trained anesthesiologist convinced the House Committee on Appropriations to add language to the fiscal 2019 Interior Department funding bill related to two wind farms planned near Ocean City. (Balt. Sun)

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Rodricks: The two ways Baltimore voters will judge Marilyn Mosby

When it comes to deciding whether Marilyn Mosby should get a second term, Baltimore voters will have two things on their minds — the cases she brought against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray and the appalling rate of violence that has occurred across our city since Mosby took office as state’s attorney. Some will readily give Mosby credit for the first thing and reward her with their votes. The Freddie Gray case was something rare: a high-profile prosecution of cops. They were each accused of contributing in some way to the gruesome death of a young man many Baltimoreans felt should not have been arrested in the first place. (Balt. Sun)

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Del. Ted Sophocleus served his constituents well throughout a long career

No doubt you can find state lawmakers who made more of a splash than Del. Ted Sophocleus, had their names on more pathbreaking legislation or gave more controversial speeches. But if you scoured the State House from end to end during a session, you wouldn’t have found anyone who had more commitment to the job and to his community, who shared more invaluable institutional knowledge and who left behind more affection and respect, among his colleagues and his constituents. “He had a heart bigger than life,” said House of Delegates Speaker Michael E. Busch. (Capital)

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Rena Steinzor: Baltimore employer of smothered worker should be held criminally accountable

On June 5, a 19-year-old construction worker named Kyle Hancock was smothered to death when a deep trench where he was working collapsed. R.F. Warder Inc., the construction company that hired Hancock to help fix a leaking sewage pipe, and the bosses it employed are responsible for his death, plain and simple. Their failure to shore the trench to prevent a collapse was grossly negligent, readily foreseeable, eminently preventable and, therefore, criminal. (Balt. Sun)

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June 8 // Maryland is in an opioid addiction crisis; here's what the Democratic candidates for governor would do about it

Shortly after he was elected, Gov. Larry Hogan convened a high-level task force to address opioid addiction and overdoses in Maryland, and he eventually declared a state of emergency because of the problem. Yet the toll addiction has taken on communities across the state — urban, rural and suburban — remains unabated. The number of overdose deaths in the first three months of 2017 — the most recent data available — is more than double that from the same period in 2014, the year before Mr. Hogan took office. This isn’t just a Maryland problem, of course; addiction and overdoses have skyrocketed nationwide. But the fact remains that what we’re doing about the problem isn’t enough. (Balt. Sun)

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Chelsea Manning, Jerome Segal and Rikki Vaughn: We’re challenging Sen. Cardin. He should debate us.

In less than three weeks, the Democratic Senate primary will be held in Maryland. And to this point, voters haven’t been given the opportunity to hear the candidates discuss the critically important issues facing the state. We, who are challenging incumbent Sen. Ben Cardin, want to know where he has been. He’s been missing in action, and we want him to engage with us in a vigorous debate. (Wash. Post)

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