Rajani Gudlavalleti: Open letter to Mayor Pugh about methadone clinics and crime

Your recent comments linking methadone clinics to the alarming murder rate in Baltimore were baseless, stigmatizing and irresponsible. We urge you to think more deeply about this subject. Our perspective may help. I represent a coalition of community-based organizations and individuals – including Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition, Bmore POWER, Communities United and Nurses for Justice-Baltimore. We are community organizers, health professionals, and peers who advocate for harm reduction approaches to drug policy. (Brew)

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Jackie Oldham: Road safety is not an us and them proposition

Road safety is not an either/or proposition. It is not a fight between cyclists and motorists, or between motorists and pedestrians. Rather, it is a compact among these groups that requires all sides to do their part, as prescribed by both law and common sense. Let’s face it: City government has not done a very good job of planning or executing the transformation of Baltimore City into a 21st century pedestrian-, cyclist-, and public transportation-friendly haven. Such grand designs require study, input from all participants and timely, coordinated communication of — and buy-in to — the design. (Balt. Sun)

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Honoring Rosewood's past by creating a better future for Maryland's intellectually and developmentally disabled

Stevenson University’s purchase for $1 of most of the former Rosewood Center campus in Owings Mills is without question a good deal for the state. We have spent millions on upkeep for the property during the decade since the institution closed. It’s a good deal for Stevenson, which has grown rapidly in recent years and needed land to expand, with no more logical place than this 117-acre parcel between its existing campuses. And it’s a good deal for Owings Mills. It promises to transform a community eyesore into a productive use, but one that won’t strain local resources in the way new residential or commercial development would. (Balt. Sun)

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The right idea

Cumberland once was a city where people said they didn’t have to lock their front doors at night... at least in most neighborhoods.  That’s changed. Crime — violent crime, in particular — has come to Cumberland in a big way. Cumberland Police and other city officials, and their allies in law enforcement, decided some time ago that the best way to fight crime here isn’t necessarily to fight crime, and we wholeheartedly agree with this approach. The best way to deal with any problem often involves dealing with what causes the problem, rather than with the problem itself. (Times-News)

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July 14 // Brian Frosh, 'grandstander'

Some Republican lawmakers in Annapolis this week sent a letter of complaint to Attorney General Brian E. Frosh over the half-dozen lawsuits he’s filed against the Trump administration on behalf of Maryland residents so far this year. They called it “grandstanding” and insisted he desist immediately. Now first, let’s relish the notion that anybody finds Mr. Frosh, who could more reasonably be called low-key and perhaps even “boring” and “wonkish,” to be a grandstander. (Balt. Sun)

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Dan K. Morhaim: No meaningful progress on health care until you address these issues

The great health care debate continues. But two key structural problems are never mentioned. Instead of looking at the big picture, the discussion so far is an exercise in re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. Problem #1: Employment and health insurance are linked but should be separated. The current system burdens both employers and employees. How did this come about? (Balt. Sun)

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Interest in Market House choice runs high

After Monday's City Council hearing on proposals for new leases at Market House, we know two things for sure: There are now just three proposals for the historic facility on City Dock, Mary Giolitti of Giolitti Fine Italian Market in Parole having withdrawn from the applicant pool. And our idea that there is a lot of public interest in this decision was no mere journalistic fixation. There was a standing-room-only crowd as people stepped to the microphone. (Capital)

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Robert Borlick: Md. offshore wind projects may hurt, instead of help, environment

Starting in 2020 Maryland’s electricity consumers will be paying higher electric bills in order to subsidize two wind projects to be developed off the Ocean City waterfront. Over the lives of these projects the subsidies will total more than $2 billion. Despite this exorbitant cost the projects will deliver no environmental benefits and, most likely, will contribute to global warming. How did this lose-lose situation come about? (Balt. Sun)

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