Carl Snowden: Work remains on police, community relations

In many of the cities of our nation, we are facing a dichotomy: two phenomenon at the same time. In Annapolis, Baltimore, Chicago and elsewhere we saw an unprecedented increase in homicides last year. Annapolitans were stunned to see the rise in murders. There were candlelight marches and vigils to focus attention on this issue. Meanwhile, all over the nation, we have witnessed an increase in police-related shootings and other deaths. (Capital)

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July 10 // Robert Arias: Inaction

Can anything get done? Every time I pick up The Capital, the headlines tell us of yet another roadblock to getting something done in this area. There is still no cardiac surgery available in Anne Arundel County. Medical cannabis cannot be grown. The Bay Bridge remains inadequate. Redevelopment of the Crystal Spring site and Eastport Shopping Center remain stymied. And just look around. Market House is hardly used. Rebuilding the Annapolis Yacht Club and the Fawcett property seem to be stalled. There are many vacant storefronts on Main Street and Maryland Avenue. Beautiful and valuable land like the former Crownsville Hospital Center and the David Taylor site look like sets for some future post-apocalypse movie. (Capital)

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Michelle Harris: Opioid Overdose Medication Naloxone on Short Supply in Baltimore

Every day at least two people die from opioid overdose in Baltimore City, according to health commissioner Dr. Leana Wen. There are only 4,000 doses remaining of the life-saving drug, naloxone, to last until July 2018 with no set date for replenishment. “If we didn’t ration it, we would use it up in the next two weeks,” said Wen. “Right now, we are making the decision every day about who are the most vulnerable people, and rationing it accordingly.” Naloxone, or more specifically Narcan, is a medication­ administered as a nasal spray or injection that reverses the effects of opioids during an overdose. Since 2015, residents administering Narcan to victims of overdose saved over 950 lives in Baltimore. (Balt. Mag.)

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Dave Anderson: How to solve the North Korea crisis

There are no good alternatives to address the growing crisis in North Korea. A military strike, traditional or nuclear, will lead to devastating consequences for our allies, South Korea and Japan. As soon as we attack North Korea, that country will most certainly start unleashing artillery on South Korea, which experts estimate could lead to 60,000 deaths within the first few hours. If it drops nuclear bombs on Seoul or Tokyo, the death toll would be catastrophic. We would win in the end and possibly destroy North Korea in its entirety. But the cost of this victory is much too large. (Balt. Sun)

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Hogan joins the crime fight

Baltimoreans may well have been nonplussed by Gov. Larry Hogan’s proclamation that he wants “any kind of possible solutions” to the violent crime in the city — except sending in state police to patrol the streets, providing more money or increasing mandatory minimum sentences for gun crimes. What, one might ask, does that leave? With the number of homicides in Baltimore rising at a staggering rate, Gov. Larry Hogan said Thursday he will meet with Mayor Catherine Pugh to discuss how the state could help. (Balt. Sun)

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Nate Loewentheil: How Baltimore can reform its way out of a crime wave

Baltimore is experiencing the worst wave of violent crime of any city in the United States. One day last month, in only 24 hours, six people were murdered. It’s as if mortal dice are rolled every day across the city’s streets. Stray bullets have injured a girl as young as 3 and a woman as old as 90. The homicide rate has gone up by almost 70 percent since 2014. A city facing such shootings would ordinarily put more cops on the streets. But in Baltimore, it is both practically and politically impossible to meaningfully increase police presence. The police department is already understaffed. Over the past 15 years, the city has steadily cut the number of police positions in the budget. (Wash. Post)

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Helena Hicks: Why Baltimore school closures hurt: a history lesson

We always knew that the ticket to a better life was education. Baltimore has had a terrible track record when it comes to giving blacks a chance to obtain a quality education. After years of fighting for black teachers in Baltimore going back to the early 1900’s, we finally got them a teacher education center in the 1940s, even though it was located on the top floor of an elementary school. More time passed before Thurgood Marshall tackled the problem of education inequality nationally – his victory in the 1954 Brown v. the Board of Education case before the U.S. Supreme Court made school segregation illegal in this country. But we still had segregated housing that reduced us to very limited choices in schools. (Brew) 

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Kevin O’Keeffe: Moving the Preakness to Laurel Park is a winning bet

I attended my first race at Pimlico in 1982 as a teenager and have been back hundreds of times since. As a lifelong Baltimorean, a horse player and a thoroughbred owner, I have come to the conclusion that it is time to move the Preakness to Laurel Park and shut down Pimlico. My early visits to Pimlico only allowed betting on live races. The only legal competition for the gambling dollar at that time was a limited Maryland lottery, visits to Atlantic City and Las Vegas, or local bingo halls. Today, there is fierce competition with simulcast betting on dozens of tracks right on your TV or phone, more lottery games, fantasy sports, and six casinos in Maryland and many more in surrounding states. (Balt. Sun)

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