In government, citizens getting what we pay for

A new study about pay levels for city of Salisbury employees is an important warning to be heeded. The report by Evergreen Solutions LLC concludes municipal workers’ pay in Salisbury should be boosted an average of 8.5 percent to ensure the city is competitive in hiring and retaining its workers. (Daily Times)

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Save during tax-free period

The designation “Shop Maryland Tax-Free Week” overshoots the reality by a mile, but shoppers looking for shoes or clothes can make their dollar go further if they make their back-to-school purchases next week. The second Sunday in August to the following Saturday is designated as “Shop Maryland Tax-Free Week” each year.  (Carr. Co. Times)

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Sparse field in city election not a good sign

You might call it political climate change: While most of us are enjoying the summer, local Republicans are wondering if their party’s prospects are going from cold to frigid. (Capital)

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Teamwork needed on runoff

Working with Carroll’s towns and cities to deal with state stormwater runoff regulations — and the huge cost associated with those regulations — should be a top priority for our board of county commissioners in the coming months. (Carr. Co. Times)

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FCC a fine beginning

In May 2010 I spent a couple of hours at school practicing for my high school graduation ceremony. While sitting quietly waiting for practice to start, two of my classmates nearby began talking about their plans for college. Both were attending public universities and talked about all the so-called failures who had to attend community college because they couldn’t get into a university. After I graduated from high school I began my college career at Frederick Community College, but not because I couldn’t get accepted into a university. (News-Post)

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Petitioning change

In her Aug. 3 story headlined “Signing up for change,” News-Post reporter Bethany Rodgers took a look at online petitions and if/how they affect local government. The answer seems to be little, if at all. But for average citizens, petitions can be a means to express their displeasure with local government and its decisions, and the simple act of doing so can be rewarding. While the effort may not succeed, there is value in it for those who participate. (News-Post)

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Compromise

Mayor Josh Cohen may be joshing us when he says there are three options for the council to consider regarding the old Acme (also called Fawcett) property. A fourth option is to tear down the building and install a park. Said park could accommodate autos as well as benches and trees. This is a sensible options since any large structure on the property would most likely undermine the fragile fill (garbage from the old fish house that worked there before there was a Compromise Street). (Capital)

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August 7 // Jump start for the Purple Line

For the time being, Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) can bask in headlines about the light rail Purple Line, which he jump-started Monday by announcing Maryland would add $400 million in state funding and seek a private partner to build and run the project, which would connect Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. He can leave it to another day to worry about financing the rest of the $2.2 billion construction, which still looks iffy. (Wash. Post)

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