Shutdown impact growing

The Department of Justice brought back a furloughed person to maintain the Amber Alert missing child website, but all around us more signs emerge each day of the issues — some life-threatening — that are growing because of the government shutdown and the lack of progress in finding a resolution. The job of our elected leaders is to keep our government running. As poll after poll has shown, we’ve long known they are incapable of running effective government, but now we know they are incapable of running government at all. (Carroll Co. Times)

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A boon for higher education

The University System of Maryland is ready to establish a significant presence in Southern Maryland, headquartered in a classroom building with advanced research facilities that the state government is poised to build. This will expand higher education opportunities here, and the research facilities will bring to this region the university system’s current focus on transforming university research to commercial technology. (Recorder)

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John McCarthy & Tom Manger: Ending the scourge of fake marijuana in Maryland

Earlier this year, the General Assembly passed legislation to deal with the serious problem of an emerging class of drugs known as "synthetic cannabinoids." The new law, which went into effect Oct. 1, prohibits the sale and possession of drugs intended to mimic the effects of marijuana, commonly sold under brand names such as "K-2," "Spice," "Voodoo Spice" "Scooby Snax," "Mr. Nice Guy" and "Mystery," to name just a few. Particularly troubling is that the packaging of these products often depict cartoon characters or images that are appealing to young people. (Balt. Sun)

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Business & Tech courts at 10: Time to take stock 

The General Assembly created the Maryland Business and Technology (“B&T”) Court Task Force in 2000. The Task Force recommended the adoption of a B&T Case Management Program within the structure of the existing circuit court system. (Daily Record)

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Tipping our hat to CAP

The Community Assistance Patrol, a volunteer contingent of the Frederick County Sheriff’s Office, is doing a lot of good work for local residents — and saving them a fistful of tax dollars along the way. News-Post reporter Daniel J. Gross’ Saturday story on CAP was an informative and uplifting one, because it revealed how and how much these volunteers are contributing to the county and its residents. (News-Post)

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Kathleen Parker: Redskins’ name is ready for retiring

As a fan of tradition, my knee-jerk reaction to the Washington Redskins controversy — should the name be changed out of respect for offended Native Americans? — was, well, knee-jerk. As in, good grief, must we change every word to please every offended group? My more-considered response is that, yes, we should — under certain circumstances — relinquish beloved tradition to the mature moment. This seems to be the sentiment of President Obama, who recently said that if he were the team owner, he would consider changing the name. (Wash. Post)

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Oct. 8 // Montgomery’s proposal to start high school later makes good sense

The proposal by Montgomery County Schools Superintendent Joshua P. Starr to begin high school classes later in the morning should come as no surprise. The recommendation is in line with years of research that shows the benefits of teenagers getting more sleep. The beauty of Mr. Starr’s proposal, set to be discussed Tuesday at a school board work session, is that it achieves this later start time with minimal disruptions — and even some advantages — to other grades. Not only would sleep-deprived teenagers have schedules more in keeping with their natural biorhythms but Montgomery elementary students, with currently the second-shortest school day in the state, would have an instructional program enhanced by extra time. (Wash. Post)

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Dan Rodricks: Now-shuttered government program nurtured Nobel winners

The American scientists who were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday have devoted most of their professional lives — up to four decades — to understanding how cells work. They did it with funding from the same government that tea party Republicans shut down last week. They did it with support from a federal agency that, because of budget cuts, might not be able to support the next generation of biomedical scientists. (Balt. Sun)

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