First, she took a knee to call out injustice. Now, this 11-year-old is fighting for her own rights.

Mariana Taylor is a sixth-grader with strong beliefs about racial injustice, sexism, gay rights and President Trump’s proposed wall at the Mexico border. Earlier this year, as her middle school class stood for the Pledge of Allegiance, she stayed seated. A couple of weeks later, she silently took a knee rather than sit — inspired by former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who ignited a national debate on patriotism and protest as he knelt during the national anthem to protest racial inequality and police brutality. “I kind of wanted to show people that what’s going on is not okay,” said Mariana, an 11-year old from Baltimore County, recalling that Kaepernick began kneeling rather than sitting after a military veteran told him it was more respectful. (Wash. Post)

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'Agents of change:' A year with the UMBC program shaping some of the nation's best and most diverse scientists

Adrian Davey hunched over a small plastic air quality sensor and threaded a red wire through one end. Freshmen Nick Balasus and Katherine Ball looked on. Davey has been stuyding the low-cost sensors since the end of his freshman year. They measure particulate air pollution from sources such as car exhaust or coal plants. Exposure to particulate matter has been linked to premature deaths. The sensors are widely available to the public. But the accuracy has not kept up with availability, according to Christopher J. Hennigan, the professor and lab director who oversees Davey’s work. Hennigan believes Davey would have been successful anywhere. The Meyerhoff program, he says, “lets their natural talents flourish.” (Balt. Sun)

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Denver Nuggets Star Donates Game Room To Baltimore School

Friday wasn’t a regular day for students at Johnston Square Elementary School. “I was out of my mind when I saw this game room,” student Tamil Daniels summed it up. A spare room was converted into a game room, thanks to a donation from NBA Denver Nuggets player Will Barton, who grew up in Baltimore and was looking for a way to give back. “How can I help this school and help kids stay in school with good attendance and keep striving to get good grades,” Barton said. (WJZ-CBS)

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Under Armour workers spend "Armour Day" fixing up three city schools

Hundreds of Under Armour employees fanned out to three Baltimore elementary/middle schools on Friday to help renovate aging buildings for “Armour Day.” Two thousand of the athletic apparel brand’s Baltimore-based workers took part in the company’s annual day of community service, typically held each May. The service day this year coincided with the start of Preakness weekend, when for the first time in years, the company chose not to host a race-day hospitality tent for top athletes and other celebrities. (Balt. Sun)

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Finding a challenge: Torrington Ford graduates from Anne Arundel Community College at 15

Torrington Ford can’t legally drive a car, but he’s landed a plane. He could read and write before most kids his age knew how to spell their names. Thursday, he’ll graduate from Anne Arundel Community College — at age 15. Before he heads off to Ohio State University in July, Torrington will be one of about 2,000 students to graduate from AACC this week — and indisputably the youngest. His college journey is three years in the making, more if you count from the day he jumped up and yelled at his mom in church. (Capital)

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At UM commencement, Al Gore urges graduates 'to reclaim the integrity of American democracy'

Speaking to 2018 graduates at the University of Maryland on Sunday, it wasn’t until 19 minutes into a 22-minute speech that former Vice President Al Gore mentioned President Donald Trump’s name. But his address nonetheless marked a commencement ceremony that pushed graduates to fight what both Gore and university President Wallace Loh described as challenges to American democracy. Gore, nowadays best known for his advocacy to fight global warming that earned him a Nobel Prize in 2007, urged the graduates to vote in large numbers in the coming years, suggesting that America’s “experiment” with the Trump administration should, like some scientific ventures, “be terminated early for ethical reasons.” (Balt. Sun)

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Harford superintendent candidates stress planning, preparation, collaboration in school safety protocols

In their interactions with the local community, the two finalists to become Harford County Public Schools’ next superintendent have emphasized the need for extensive preparation, training and collaboration to ensure schools are safe. David Ring Jr., a former president of the Institute of Notre Dame private school in Baltimore and former superintendent of the Delmar School District between Maryland and Delaware, and Sean Bulson, a University of North Carolina System official, former superintendent of schools in Wilson County, N.C. and former Montgomery County Public Schools official, talked about their experiences of preparing their school districts for a mass shooting situation during community forums this week. (Aegis)

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Sean Bulson, Harford superintendent finalist, meets with community

Throughout his 23-year career in education, the partnerships and strong relationships Sean Bulson has developed with community leaders have created multiple successes for students. “Going back through my career, partnership is pretty much the only way I know to do the work,” Bulson said during a community forum at the A.A. Roberty Building in Bel Air Thursday evening. “My philosophy is to draw on the vast array of resources that are in a community.” (Aegis)

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