Elkridge Elementary encourages involvement with Just for Dads

When it comes to children and education, parental involvement is crucial. But when one Howard County educator looked around his school, he noticed that parental involvement wasn't, well, paternal. "Mostly, you see moms at the school, volunteering or with PTAs," said Conrad Brookhart, a physical education teacher at Elkridge Elementary School. "I wanted to find a way to impact dads, get them more involved with their kids at the school." (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Oct. 14 // Unusual collaboration at UMES, Salisbury benefits both schools

Martin Ngwa, a student at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, plans to go into social work after graduation — though his school doesn't offer the major. Thanks to an unusual partnership between UMES, an historically black institution, and Salisbury University, its traditionally white neighbor, Ngwa is earning dual degrees in sociology and social work. The opportunity to take classes on both Eastern Shore campuses is the result of several decades of collaboration — a partnership that was praised this week in a federal court opinion that found some Maryland policies still promote "separate but equal" colleges and universities. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Montgomery County surveys indicate shift in favor of later high school start times

As Montgomery County seeks community reaction to a proposal to shift the opening bells of high school to 8:15 a.m., allowing teens to get more sleep, surveys suggest a change of public mood on the issue since the 1990s. “I think there’s greater education about how important sleep is,” said parent Mandi Mader, who launched a petition last year to shift the high school schedule. Research and public awareness have increased, she said, and in Montgomery, “it hit a nerve.” (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Weak student achievement, new academic standards concern Pr. George’s school board

Only half of students who graduated from Prince George’s County’s public high schools last year enrolled in college, and 90 percent of the graduates in community college are taking remedial classes in math and reading, according to data shared with the county’s Board of Education during a presentation on student achievement, secondary-school changes and the new academic standards. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

In push for Muslim school holiday, some Montgomery students will stay home

On other holidays, the choice has been difficult: Education or faith? But this year, with the Muslim holy day of Eid al-Adha on Tuesday, the Shraim family decided against school. Their teenagers might fall behind in their classes. They might feel torn. But they will stay home to celebrate. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Baltimore County educator named Md. Teacher of the Year

A Baltimore County English teacher who the state superintendent said "personifies the cutting edge Maryland educator" was named Maryland's 2013-2014 Teacher of the Year, state education officials announced Friday. Sean McComb, of Patapsco High School & Center for the Arts, was surprised with the honor at a gala attended by state and local education officials and political leaders at Martin's West. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Maryland Dreamers Awake to In-State Tuition, Yearn for More

Thanks to the Maryland Dream Act, hundreds of mostly young undocumented immigrants will get a chance at something most “typical middle-class kids” can receive, a more affordable college education. But the law, which took effect in December, is only one benefit that most legal residents can enjoy. Dreamers — often brought by their parents to the U.S. — are not eligible for government or bank loans and scholarships, face endless difficulties in applying for citizenship and struggle to find work permits and employment. (CNS)

Read Full Article

Md. in forefront of school-readiness tests starting in kindergarten

More than a decade ago, Maryland became among the first states to administer a comprehensive test of skills at the academic starting line. Today, as educators and lawmakers tighten their focus on improving the quality of early learning opportunities, about half of all states have some type of entry assessment, and the number is growing. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article