Oakdale FFA growth reflects national trend

A new school usually comes with new programs, and Oakdale High is a case in point. Frederick County’s newest high school began a new FFA program with 28 members last year. Membership in the agricultural program has increased to more than 50 this year. That one-year membership spike reflects a national trend, attributed to a growing recognition of the need for a thriving agriculture industry that safely produces quality foods. (News-Post)

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Weak student achievement, new academic standards concern Pr. George’s school board

Only half of students who graduated from Prince George’s County’s public high schools last year enrolled in college, and 90 percent of the graduates in community college are taking remedial classes in math and reading, according to data shared with the county’s Board of Education during a presentation on student achievement, secondary-school changes and the new academic standards. (Wash. Post)

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In push for Muslim school holiday, some Montgomery students will stay home

On other holidays, the choice has been difficult: Education or faith? But this year, with the Muslim holy day of Eid al-Adha on Tuesday, the Shraim family decided against school. Their teenagers might fall behind in their classes. They might feel torn. But they will stay home to celebrate. (Wash. Post)

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Montgomery County surveys indicate shift in favor of later high school start times

As Montgomery County seeks community reaction to a proposal to shift the opening bells of high school to 8:15 a.m., allowing teens to get more sleep, surveys suggest a change of public mood on the issue since the 1990s. “I think there’s greater education about how important sleep is,” said parent Mandi Mader, who launched a petition last year to shift the high school schedule. Research and public awareness have increased, she said, and in Montgomery, “it hit a nerve.” (Wash. Post)

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Maryland Dreamers Awake to In-State Tuition, Yearn for More

Thanks to the Maryland Dream Act, hundreds of mostly young undocumented immigrants will get a chance at something most “typical middle-class kids” can receive, a more affordable college education. But the law, which took effect in December, is only one benefit that most legal residents can enjoy. Dreamers — often brought by their parents to the U.S. — are not eligible for government or bank loans and scholarships, face endless difficulties in applying for citizenship and struggle to find work permits and employment. (CNS)

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Carroll Commissioners to vote on college bus fare increase Thursday

 

The Carroll County Board of Commissioners will vote on the proposed college bus pass fare increase Thursday. (Carroll Co. Times)

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Coppin State students feed the hungry

First came the decorations for the bags: a few words of inspiration, a drawing, and a heart with a pound sign scrawled inside. Next came the lunch: a turkey sandwich, an apple, an Oreo cookie and a water bottle — with most of the food paid for, and prepared by, Coppin State University students. And then came the social media campaign. The students huddled for photos to post on Instagram and Twitter, tagging their entries with #HashTagLunchBag, as they became the first Baltimore group to participate in an effort to feed homeless people that has been spread through social networking sites. (Balt. Sun)

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Anti-bullying event has Hyattsville sixth-graders seeing orange

They wore orange shirts, carried orange balloons, made orange decorations, and some even wore orange headbands and hair ties. But the sixth-graders at Rosa Park Elementary School in Hyattsville weren’t making a fashion statement — they were taking part in National Unity Day, an initiative promoting bullying awareness. (Gazette)

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