Teachers Across Maryland Flexing Their Political Muscle

Three years ago, Allison Heintz was a 4th grade teacher who had never been politically active. Then Donald Trump was elected president. Heintz attended the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., was inspired to use her voice, and now finds herself lobbying her local legislators, working on political campaigns, even appearing on the nightly news after speaking at a rally – all on the topic of education. “I decided I wanted to become a teacher in elementary school,” said Heintz, who teaches at Cape St. Clair Elementary School in Annapolis. “This [becoming an activist] never crossed my mind.” (Md. Matters)

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Summer Hunger: Advocates Push for Changes to Child Nutrition Programs

About four of five Maryland school children who receive free and reduced price lunches during the school year may be going hungry this summer. The state, like many others, struggles to feed lower income Maryland children through summertime meal programs. In July 2018, about 65,425 low-income kids received a summer meal on an average day, about 22.4 percent of the number that receive a free or low-price lunch during the school year, according to a new report from the Food Research & Action Center (FRAC), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that advocates for policies and public-private partnerships to address hunger and undernutrition in the U.S. (Md. Matters) 

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Couple funds new scholarship at BW

Bishop Walsh School is instituting a new scholarship through the generosity of Jim and Karen McIntyre. The Daddy Don Scholarship will provide assistance to a student who would not have the opportunity to attend Bishop Walsh without some form of financial aid. The scholarship is in honor of Jim’s McIntyre’s father, Don McIntyre, who owned and operated McIntyre’s on Cumberland Street. The selected student must participate in two sports and maintain a 3.0 GPA for the entire year and volunteer to work with the adult developmentally disabled community one day a week during the school year and a one-week camp in the summer. (Times-News)

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Washington County Public Schools looks at updating student-discipline policy

To keep up with state law, the Washington County Board of Education is reviewing its current student-discipline policy. A requirement of the recently signed Senate Bill 1030, also called the “Blueprint for Maryland’s Future,” is implementing restorative practices and trauma-informed approaches in schools across the state. According to Washington County Public Schools Chief Legal Counsel Anthony Trotta, the law states that measures should be rehabilitative, restorative and educational, but doesn’t eliminate other forms of discipline, such as suspension and expulsion. (Herald Mail)

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Johns Hopkins spent $581,000 on lobbying during push for armed police force

In its push to gain authorization for an armed police force, Johns Hopkins spent more than half a million dollars on lobbying lawmakers in Annapolis this past legislative session. The $581,000 Hopkins paid out during its lobbying effort marked a 58 percent increase from the 2018 session, when the university and hospital paid lobbyists $367,000, according to disclosure forms Hopkins filed with the State Ethics Commission that were released this month. Hopkins was the third-biggest spender on lobbying in the state of Maryland for the regular 2019 General Assembly session, which ended in April. (Balt. Sun)

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Howard Superintendent Michael Martirano strives for 'student voice to be very much alive'

As superintendent of the Howard County Public School System, Michael Martirano has to talk to many people each day. However, the conversations where he learns the most about whether he is fulfilling his role as superintendent of the 77-school district don’t come from fellow school system employees or even parents, but from the students who walk the hallways of those schools. Martirano has gotten information about what happens on school bus rides, concerns about school start times and sleep, and has advanced initiatives centering on mental health issues all from conversations with students. (Balt. Sun)

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University System of Maryland appoints committee to find chancellor’s replacement starting in 2020

The University System of Maryland has created an 18-member committee to search for Chancellor Robert Caret’s replacement before he finishes his term in 2020. In a news release, Board of Regents Chair Linda Gooden announced the creation of the group Tuesday, writing that its members will be tasked with finding a replacement for Caret, who will complete his term June 30, 2020.  After being hired in 2015, Caret announced last month his plans not to seek an additional five-year term, prompting the system to start searching for a replacement. The state’s university system oversees 12 college campuses across the state. The committee will be led by Gooden and Vice Chair Barry Gossett. (Balt. Sun)

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Tinbite Sworn in as Student School Board Member

Nate Tinbite, a rising senior at John F. Kennedy High School in Wheaton, was sworn in Monday as the 42nd student member of the Montgomery County Board of Education. He will serve a one-year term after he secured 74% of the votes cast in an April student election in which 85% of middle and high school students cast ballots. Tinbite based his candidacy on achieving equity among all student groups, expanding mental health resources and improving technology in schools. Also on Tinbite’s agenda is increasing career pathways for students by expanding the Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES) program to all schools. (Bethesda) 

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