Teach for America Baltimore gets $1 million donation

Baltimore philanthropists Patricia and Mark Joseph donated $1 million to the city’s chapter of Teach for America, the organization announced Monday. The money — one of the largest gifts ever to the city’s Teach for America corps — will provide intensive support for first and second-year teachers and expand programming for the organization’s alumni network. “We’ll continue to be able to be a source of diverse, committed teachers and leaders for the students in Baltimore,” said Courtney Cass, executive director of Teach for America–Baltimore. “This gift will also enable us to expand the number of leaders committed to working in Baltimore for a lifetime on behalf of educational equity.” (Balt. Sun)

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University of Maryland draws investment, partnership with Fortune 500 company

University of Maryland's efforts to build up a "Discovery District" in College Park just earned a major vote of confidence from a new Fortune 500 partner. McLean-based Capital One Financial Corp. will make a $3 million investment in UMd.'s machine learning program and will open a new 7,500-square-foot innovation lab right off campus. The funding from Capital One will be used to endow a faculty chair in the Department of Computer Science focused on machine learning. (Wash. Bus. Journal)

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Tiny Smith Island elementary school sends Christmas ornaments to Washington

When Maryland artist Katherine Dilworth was asked by the Maryland State Arts Council to design a concept for the ornament that would represent Maryland in 2017 in Washington, D.C., it didn't take her long to come up with a group of students to create the ornaments she envisioned.  She recalled a visit to Smith Island a few years ago. There, Ewell Elementary is one of the smallest schools in Maryland, with just 11 students enrolled in pre-K through seventh grade. It employs one certified teacher who also serves as principal, one instructional assistant, someone who prepares meals and a custodian. (Daily Times)

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Mid faces discipline after scaling Naval Academy Chapel for traditional stunt

Naval Academy lore claims a midshipman who can get his cap — called a cover —atop the chapel’s obelisk will earn relaxed restrictions, or carry-on. The midshipman who climbed more than 200 feet to plant his cover at the legendary spot late last week will receive the opposite of that, an academy spokesman said Monday. Lt. Cmdr. David McKinney said the unnamed mid faces serious consequences for the dangerous stunt in the days leading up to the Army-Navy football game Saturday in Philadelphia. (Capital)

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December 11 // Johns Hopkins University president among top 30 highest-paid private college presidents in new report

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels was the 30th highest-paid private university president, with the seventh highest in base salary in the country, in 2015, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s annual executive compensation report. Daniels was the highest paid public or private university head in the state, making $1.3 million in 2015, the most recent year listed in the report, released Sunday. While his base pay has increased each year since becoming president in 2009, his overall compensation dropped in 2014 and 2015 from a high of $1.6 million in 2013, the report said. (Balt. Sun)

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Carroll County schools superintendent lifts ban on field trips to Baltimore

Carroll County’s schools superintendent said Friday that he is lifting a ban on field trips to Baltimore, saying county law enforcement officials were encouraged by recently announced anti-crime initiatives. The rural county’s ban on Baltimore field trips will end Jan. 2, the superintendent said. When field trips to the city’s cultural attractions — such as museums and the Maryland Science Center — resume, they will have stricter rules that limit students’ unstructured time and require more communication among chaperons. The schools announced the travel ban last month based on a recommendation from Carroll County Sheriff James DeWees, who cited concerns for student and staff safety while the city is experiencing record levels of crime. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Repeal of tax deduction could keep local teachers from buying their own supplies

When Jason Offutt’s students enter his classroom for back-to-school night, they’re sorted into their houses. Offutt has a replica sorting hat from the Harry Potter book and movie series, and has each child pick a tile out of the hat that tells each student which “house” he or she will be in for the rest of the year. These decorations, this experience, these are not things the school system pays for — Offutt buys them with his own money, and he’s not reimbursed for it. Teachers often spend hundreds, sometimes more than $1,000 of their own money on school supplies and instruction materials each year. In the past, teachers have been able to write off $250 of those materials on their taxes — a nice gesture, but one that rarely covers everything a teacher buys. (News-Post)

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School board begins looking at ways to eliminate nearly $7 million gap in FY19 funding

With about a month until Carroll County Public Schools Superintendent Stephen Guthrie releases his proposed fiscal year 2019 operating budget, the school board got a first look Wednesday at what is shaping up to be a nearly $7 million budget funding gap. The preliminary FY19 expenditure budget has increased 1.65 percent over FY18, coming in this year at $351.3 million. The school system’s preliminary budget, which was discussed at the Dec. 6 work session, shows about a $9.2 million, or 2.7 percent, increase in expenditures over FY18, which is primarily caused by the third year of negotiated salary increases for CCPS teachers and staff. (Carr. Co. Times)

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