Md. House approves ‘yes means yes’ requirement for sex education

Maryland’s House of Delegates on Saturday approved legislation that would require public schools to teach a “yes means yes” standard for sexual consent, moving the state one step closer to becoming only the second to adopt such a mandate. The measure was among a long list of bills the Democratic-led House approved in a busy floor session lasting more than three hours, with a Monday deadline looming for “crossover day.” That refers to the date by which measures must advance out of at least one chamber to have the best chance of reaching the governor’s desk. (Wash. Post)

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As opioid crisis intensifies, one Md. school system looks at a ‘recovery’ school

Kevin Burnes thinks his school saved his life. He arrived there at 14 years old, just out of rehab, and says it was exactly what he needed: a place where kids with drug and alcohol problems could stay on a path of recovery as they worked toward high school graduation. “I have no question that it changed the course of everything I was doing,” said Burnes, now a music teacher and musician. The school that made the difference was Phoenix, in Montgomery County, believed to have been the first of its kind in the country. It opened in 1979 amid concerns about student drug use and continued for decades before fizzling to an end four years ago at a time of flux for alternative programs. (Wash. Post)

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Johns Hopkins could take funding hit from Trump's proposed $5.8B NIH cut

Johns Hopkins University earns more National Institutes of Health awards than any other institution in the nation. And with a new budget proposal from the Trump administration proposing a 20 percent funding cut to NIH, the Baltimore school is poised to take a hit. In fiscal 2016, Hopkins won 1,297 awards for $651 million, according to NIH data, outpacing University of California, San Francisco by $73 million. The University of Maryland, Baltimore, received $148 million in NIH grants that year. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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For some school advocates, Pugh’s “State of the City” disappointed

Laying out her policies and programs with enthusiasm, at one point invoking her past as a Morgan State University cheerleader, Mayor Catherine Pugh delivered her first “State of the City” address last week. “Cheer with me for the success of Baltimore,” she said, at the conclusion of an address that wove together her general policy positions on public safety, employment, economic development and more. Many did cheer, in a room packed with city council members and her administration’s department heads. But one group of listeners beyond City Hall, who were hoping to cheer, said they came away instead disappointed and concerned. (Brew)

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Howard County extends school year to June 14 after March snow day

Following this week's wintery weather, Howard County public schools have added one day to this school year, making students' last day Wednesday, June 14. The decision was made after an inclement weather closing on March 14, officials said. Schools originally planned to end the year for students on Tuesday, June 13. State law requires schools to meet a minimum of 180 school days and use one of the seven inclement weather makeup days in the 2016-2017 calendar. (Balt. Sun)

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State superintendent visits Carroll schools as part of yearlong tour

Karen Salmon watched as a small group of students helped cut bright green Rice Krispie treats covered in marshmallows. The students carefully sliced through the St. Patrick's Day treat as Salmon stood off to the side watching the kids, who are a part of the county's autism program, practice life skills. Salmon, Maryland's superintendent of schools, spent Friday visiting three Carroll County schools as part of a yearlong goal of getting into schools across the entire state. She's hit 18 counties so far, she added. And she plans to get through them all by the end of the year, and make it a tradition. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Montgomery College adding $75M student center to its Rockville campus

Montgomery College is nearly ready to break ground on a $75 million construction project that will include a new student center on its main campus in Rockville. This is a rendering of the new student center planned for Montgomery College in Rockville. The student center will consolidate a number of student life programs in a four-story building off North Campus Drive. The community college is eyeing a May groundbreaking after a final construction contract with Grunley Construction Co. of Rockville is approved by the Maryland Department of Public Works, said Sandra Filippi, acting director of campus planning. The cost of the project is being shared by Montgomery County and the state. (Wash. Bus. Journal)

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BCCC again seeks developer for prime Bard Building site

Baltimore City Community College has again put out a call for the redevelopment of the prime Bard Building site downtown. A request for proposals for the redevelopment of the 1.1-acre site located at 600 block of E. Lombard St. has been issued by BCCC, which owns the property in conjunction with the state of Maryland. Bids could include a development plan for both the Bard Building and adjacent Holocaust Memorial, which would total 2.3 acres and encompasses an entire city block. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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