Baltimore Students Surprised With New Winter Coats From ‘Operation Warm’

More than 100 Baltimore students were surprised with new winter coats Friday. Operation Warm and Baltimore native all-star Malcolm Delaney teamed up to help children in need, as brand new winter coats were given to students at Garrett Heights Elementary and Middle School on Friday. “Nice, it’s like it’s Christmas today but it’s not,” said Aniya Brown, a fourth-grader. It was an unexpected holiday surprise from the national non-profit Operation Warm and Delaney, who was born and raised in Baltimore. (WJZ-CBS)

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Governor Hogan Wants To Expand P-TECH Program

Governor Larry Hogan is expanding a program that offers high school students career training in tech, along with an opportunity to earn a degree. The governor said that the Pathways in Technology Early College High school program, also known as P-TECH, has been successful at the eight schools it’s currently offered at. New legislation would remove the caps on the number of schools allowed to offer P-TECH and get rid of the timeline that said that no new schools could be added until 2022. (WJZ-CBS)

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New after-school sports producing results in and out of classroom for Henderson-Hopkins

Prior to start of the current school year, the Henderson-Hopkins school in East Baltimore was a frustrating contradiction. The kindergarten through eighth grade school on Ashland Avenue, the first new school built in that part of the city in more than 20 years when it opened in January 2014, is an architectural gem that stands in contrast to many other city schools. However, what was happening inside the school didn't match the smartly functional physical appearance; test scores at some grade levels were especially disappointing and even enrollment was declining. (pressbox)

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Anne Arundel school board halts Shady Side cellphone tower

The Anne Arundel County Board of Education voted 6-3 last week to halt the proposed cellphone tower project at Shady Side Elementary School. The project has been under scrutiny since wireless infrastructure company Milestone Communications approached the school board in June 2017. The vote represents a victory for some Shady Side parents and residents who are worried about potential health risks associated with wireless radiation. “I’m happy about the vote and the outcome,” said Linda Nguyen, who has a kindergartener at the school. “This is not going away, though.” (Capital)

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26 FCPS schools restricted from student transfers

Twenty-six Frederick County Public Schools schools are restricted from out-of-district student transfers for the 2019-2020 school year because they are predicted to be over or near capacity in Sept. 2019. Many of these schools are in high-growth areas of the county, where new developments cause increased enrollment. A few school projects are underway to help mitigate this crowding in schools, including an Urbana Elementary replacement school. (News-Post)

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One month after student death, Maryland is still working to combat adenovirus on its campus

The virus arrived with little warning. It would pop up in a dormitory. Then it would beset students living off campus. As University of Maryland students embark on their winter break, disease trackers have found no obvious ties among the people who fell ill from adenovirus during the fall semester. University officials said 40 students have tested positive, including one who died of an illness associated with the disease. “There hasn’t been much in the way of commonalities that we’ve been able to detect,” University Health Center director David McBride said. (Wash. Post)

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Pasadena residents determined to find solutions after slew of racist incidents

“It’s a gut punch every time,” said Eva Reynolds, a mother of four kids who attend Pasadena-area schools. For the second time in two months, a noose was hung at Chesapeake Middle School — two days before activists retraced the path of a Henry Davis, a black man who tortured, dragged and lynched in the streets of Annapolis in 1906. Friday’s walk memorialized 4,000 lynching victims and is a reminder that racism is still alive, said Carl Snowden, convener of the Caucus of African American Leaders. Snowden also seeks greater involvement from the county school system to address repeated racist incidents at Chesapeake High School feeder schools. (Capital)

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Update, Sweeping Changes to Funding Formula for Md. Schools Put on Hold

WASHINGTON — Maryland’s K-12 education funding formula has been undergoing an update by a state panel that’s also been at work on sweeping policy changes. But this week, lawmakers let the members of the Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education know that getting legislation through the General Assembly would be nearly impossible. That means any major changes in the spending formula would not be in legislative plans until the 2020 session. (WTOP)

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