U-Md. at College Park is warned that it could lose accreditation

The University of Maryland at College Park confirmed Friday that the school has been placed on warning by the Middle States Commission of Higher Education and that its accreditation is in jeopardy. The commission informed the school that it had reached its decision because of “insufficient evidence that [it] is currently in compliance with Standard VII (Governance, Leadership, and Administration),” according to a joint statement by University System of Maryland Board of Regents Chair Linda Gooden and University of Maryland at College Park President Wallace Loh. (Wash. Post)

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Graduating ACPS seniors accepted to 31 schools

Students in the graduating class of 2019 in Allegany County Public Schools have been accepted to 31 different colleges, universities and technical schools across the country. Of the 635 graduates, 282 of them have chosen to continue their studies locally at either Allegany College of Maryland or Frostburg State University. In addition, 225 graduates were offered $8.9 million in merit, athletic, academic and senatorial scholarships. (Times-News)

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Montgomery Co. schools revise rules on foreign exchange students

After having announced that most Montgomery County high schools would be closed to foreign exchange students for the next school year, Maryland’s largest school system has backtracked a bit. Spokeswoman Gboyinde Onijala told WTOP Friday that, after school officials “had heard from community members and families” who host exchange students, most high schools in the county will be allowed to take up to five foreign exchange students each. (WTOP)

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Kirwan funding supports average 5% salary increase for Harford teachers

Harford County Public Schools teachers will receive a roughly 5% salary increase next year, thanks to additional funding coming to the school system through the state’s Kirwan Commission. The president of the local teachers’ union noted the necessity of that raise, as the workload of teachers and other HCPS employees whose duties are related to the classroom is expected to increase in fiscal 2020 due to more than 100 positions being cut to help balance next year’s budget. “I’m very grateful that our teachers will be making more money next year, because they’re going to have a whole lot more work to do because of these cuts,” Chrystie Crawford-Smick, president of the Harford County Education Association, said Thursday. (Balt. Sun)

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Board of Education approves educational facilities master plan

The Board of Education approved the 2019 Educational Facilities Master Plan at its Wednesday night meeting. The EFMP is an overview of the next 10 years and includes any improvement projects the school system deems as needs. The projects focus mainly on the condition of school buildings and any capital improvements deemed necessary. The EFMP had been a slight point of contention recently as the Frederick County Council alerted the school board that not enough funding is available for the full scope of the plan. (News-Post)

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MCPS Scales Back Foreign Exchange Student Restrictions

Amid backlash about a plan to bar foreign exchange students from most county high schools, the Montgomery school system is scaling back its restrictions and re-examining policies. Earlier this month, the school system told three organizations it partners with to host exchange students that 18 of its 26 high schools would not be open to placements due to crowded buildings. On Thursday, a school system spokeswoman said school leaders had received significant feedback from community members and exchange program representatives denouncing the plan and has opted to only restrict exchange students from a handful of schools that are severely crowded and cap the number of exchange students accepted countywide at 50. (Bethesda)

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Foundation Gives $2.7M To City For ‘Social Good’ In Baltimore Community

Three years after granting the West Baltimore community over $1 million, one of the world’s largest investment companies will be granting Charm City once again. The T. Rowe Price Foundation is giving a $2.7 million grant to the City for a four-year program focusing on art, education and human services. “All we have seen is beauty grit and grace by the folks in Baltimore”, John Brothers of T Rowe Price says. “A lot of folks are positive about their city, of course acknowledging the challenges that we have but certainly also saying is a city that has a lot of great, wonderful assets.” (WJZ-TV)

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Maryland districts join national trend in eliminating class rank

The Maryland school districts that recently chose to eliminate class rank are part of a national trend that’s been building for years. A student’s rank once carried major weight in college admissions decisions. Now, more than half of all high schools have decided not to report the way a student stacks up against their peers — with schools in two large Central Maryland systems soon to join them. The shift began with private schools, according to The College Board, that felt many bright students weren’t able to crack into the top of a small class and were then overlooked by selective colleges. (Balt. Sun)

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