End of Deep Impact comet mission saddens University of Md. professor who worked on it

After you’ve been getting messages for about nine years, and they suddenly stop, you don’t just shrug and give up, even if the distances involved were great. So efforts were made to get back in touch. But the silence went on, and last week, the long mission of the spacecraft sent out years ago to study a comet, with a University of Maryland professor as principal investigator, was formally declared by NASA to be over. (Wash. Post)

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Carroll County Public Schools to feature local produce

At all 43 school locations, Carroll County Public Schools are featuring signs that point out the local produce they will serve this week in an effort to encourage healthy eating and to teach students about where their food comes from. The effort is part of the sixth annual Maryland Homegrown School Lunch Week. (Carroll Co. Times)

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Father urges focus on learning ability, not disabilities

Trent Stroup is a man of action. Two years ago, when the Towson-area father of three saw that his then 7-year-old daughter Addie was regressing significantly in the community public school she attended, he didn't waste any time acting. Addie, diagnosed with the rare brain disorder Aicardi syndrome before she was a year old, has epilepsy and autism. A switch in schools between kindergarten and first grade resulted in a serious downward spiral, according to her father. She lost many skills she had previously acquired, such as writing her name, and she strongly resisted attending school. (Balt. Sun)

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Harford library board approves Sunday hours for Jarrettsville branch

Members of the Harford County Public Library's Board of Trustees voted 7-0 in favor of establishing Sunday hours for the Jarrettsville branch, making it the fourth library branch in the county to have Sunday hours. (Aegis)

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Mold found in Montgomery elementary school sparks parents’ health concerns

An outbreak of mold at Rolling Terrace Elementary School was discovered the second week of classes. It was found on walls, desks, chairs and carpets — blotches of fungus identified in 21 classrooms. Cleanup started right away, and Montgomery school officials maintain that Rolling Terrace is safe and under close monitoring. But many parents say they were kept in the dark about the problem for four days and worry that children have been sickened, either by the mold or the products used to clean it. (Wash. Post)

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During law school reunion, city's history of desegregated public pools discussed

During a weekend gathering of black alumni from the University of Maryland Law School in which the continuing inequalities faced by African-Americans was discussed, one participant called for Baltimore to preserve the city's tradition of public pools. UM law professor Taunya Lovell Banks presented Saturday new work on the civil rights history of swimming in Baltimore and questioned whether Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is doing enough to keep the pools open and available. (Balt. Sun)

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State, local officials combat college alcohol abuse

Drinking in college has become routine, almost ritualistic. Flip cup and beer pong, games aimed at consuming alcohol fast, are almost expectations. And the newcomers to campus are vulnerable to these perceptions. (Carroll Co. Times)

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Sept. 20 // UM medical school studying vaccine for deadly flu strain

Scientists with the University of Maryland School of Medicine are helping to test a vaccine to fight a lethal strain of bird flu that has killed 44 people in China. The H7N9 strain has not yet been found in the United States, but the medical school's Center for Vaccine Development is among nine sites around the country where researchers are participating in two clinical trials to get the vaccine ready as a precaution in case of a global pandemic. (Balt. Sun)

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