July 16 // Governor appoints members to school safety board

Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) announced several appointments Monday to a new center on school safety, part of a violence-prevention initiative that also included the sweeping gun-control measures signed into law earlier this year. The Maryland Center for School Safety — established in legislation sponsored by Del. Jay Walker (D-Dist. 26) of Fort Washington and supported by O’Malley — will work with public safety and law enforcement partners to establish and promote best practices, collect data, and provide training and technical assistance regarding school safety issues. (Gazette)

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Md. child care subsidy program underfunded

Maryland's Child Care Subsidy program, which gives poor families vouchers for care so parents can work or go to school, is so underfunded that it hasn't met federal rate guidelines in a decade and still uses income eligibility criteria from 2001. The deficit prevents thousands of families from participating and relegates many of those who do to the least expensive care available — often the lowest caliber in terms of facilities, educational offerings and staff training. (Balt. Sun)

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Dissatisfaction with student discipline reflected in city schools surveys

The Baltimore city school system released this month the results of its annual school climate surveys, now called "School Surveys," which poll staff, students and parents on their satisfaction with everything from academic support to school safety. While the school district reported that the results of the survey were generally positive when it came to overall satisfaction with schools--except their physical infrastructure--the results also show that there was notable dissatisfaction with the climate in several of them. (Balt. Sun)

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Roundtable: Infrastructure, teacher training key to improving technology in classrooms

The future of digital learning in classrooms will require more than just getting tablets in the hands of students to be successful. Education leaders and policymakers must focus on investing on infrastructure and professional training for teachers and administrators to grow technology in education. Montgomery County schools Superintendent Joshua P. Starr was the keynote speaker at the event in downtown Washington. (Wash. Post)

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Residents protest hiring for Coppin project

A small but vocal group of community leaders rallied Monday morning on a west Baltimore street corner to pressure Coppin State University and its contractors to hire more neighborhood residents during construction of an $87 million science and technology building — the latest in a series of efforts to force government-supported projects to hire in the city. (Balt. Sun)

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Judge awards $21.4 million to Randallstown High shooting victim

A Baltimore County man paralyzed from the waist down in a 2004 shooting at Randallstown High School was awarded $21.4 million Monday in a civil case against the two men convicted in the attack. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Kathleen Cox ruled in favor of William "Tipper" Thomas, now 26, who was shot twice outside in the school parking lot about a month before he was scheduled to graduate. (Balt. Sun)

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Children who attend preschool do better in kindergarten than those who don’t, study says

Children who attend preschool do better in kindergarten than those who stay at home with their parents or relatives, according to a national report. The federal data, which focused on children who entered kindergarten in 2010, showed that those who had some preschool experience the year before kindergarten at a child care center or a home-based program with a non-relative did better on math and reading assessments than the 15 percent who were cared for by a relative and the 21 percent who were at home with parents. (Wash. Post)

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Two-day stay at McDaniel helps to alleviate parent fears

Six McDaniel College students sat on the stage in Decker Forum Monday, where they were fielding a number of questions from the parents whose children will be their peers come this fall. Many of the parents asked routine questions, such as how many hours the students spend studying each week and what type of computer they recommend purchasing, but others were a bit more hard-hitting. (Carroll Co. Times)

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