Carroll superintendent proposes new schools, redistricting following facilities report

The Washington state based firm hired to evaluate Carroll County Public Schools facilities highlighted the shortcomings of aging school buildings Charles Carroll Elementary, William Winchester Elementary, and Westminster East Middle. Superintendent Steve Guthrie agrees with those findings. "We have three schools in desperate need of modernization," Guthrie said Tuesday. "All are in various stages of disrepair." (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Linkages to Learning program may expand to help more students, families

A long-standing program serving Montgomery County students and their families is hoping to see some more program sites and increased staffing as the county’s operating budget takes shape. The Linkages to Learning program, which includes sites at schools around the county, could receive a boost in county funding after the country’s economic downturn halted a trend of increasing funding and resulted in cuts to the program. In fiscal 2013, the program served more than 5,000 students at 26 Montgomery schools, according to a copy of the program’s six-year strategic plan. (Gazette)

Read Full Article

Officials praise new school safety program in Carroll County

When Master Deputy Jeremy Holland speaks to high school students about the effects of drug abuse, his comments not only reflect his knowledge of the law, but also his experiences with abusers. "We had a man saying his house was full of zombies and that they were there to eat him," Holland told students, some of whom reacted with shocked expressions, in a recent health class at Century High School. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Hereford parents and students protest school schedules

Hereford High School parents and students packed the Baltimore County school board meeting Tuesday night to protest the change in high school schedules. Carrying signs that said "No Voice, No Choice," the students said they didn't want to change their schedules to take double the number of classes in a semester. Currently, Hereford students have four subjects taken each day in periods that are about 90 minutes long. The students then take four different subjects the next semester, for a total of eight classes in a year. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

County puts the brakes on Laurel school's stop sign proposal

A Laurel charter school hoping for the green light on its stop sign request to make student arrivals and departures easier was turned down by transportation authorities a second time. Parents and staff at Chesapeake Math and IT Academy raised concerns about the busy intersection at the school’s entrance and asked Prince George’s County to install three-way stop signs to increase pedestrian safety. (Gazette)

Read Full Article

Feb. 12 // School districts making up for lost snow days

As D.C. and Maryland brace for another predicted snowfall Wednesday night, area school systems are counting the days and hours they need to make up if their students spend yet another day home from schoolSome districts are considering shrinking spring break or extending the school year. Others are adding minutes to the school day. For thousands of students, previously scheduled teacher work days will turn into regular school days. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Maryland high school seniors top the nation on AP exams

For the eighth consecutive year, Maryland had the highest percentage of high school seniors in the country pass Advanced Placement tests in 2013. Nearly 30 percent of Maryland’s seniors earned a college-ready score of 3 or better on the tests, according to a report released by the College Board on Tuesday. The tests — which range from the arts to world languages across more than 30 subjects — aim to give students a taste of work at the college level, and those who pass them can earn college credit while still in high school. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Incentives paying off for students in AP program in Harford

In 2012, Boeing agreed to pump hundreds of thousands of dollars into one Harford County high school to improve Advanced Placement achievement in hopes that students — many the children of military and defense contracting families — would pursue science and math courses in college. Aberdeen High School teachers and students were paid $100 for every passing score on an Advanced Placement test. The number of science and math classes increased, and teachers underwent intensive training during the summer. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article