Displaced families meet with city, CSX officials

City officials and representatives of CSX met Sunday with Charles Village residents displaced by last week's landslide, updating efforts aimed at getting them back into their homes. "I was very pleased with the mayor's presence today," said Mark Truelove, one of the residents of the first block of E. 26th Street displaced by the collapse of a 120-year-old retaining wall. He said he was less reassured by CSX officials, whom he said "had a few things to say about the specific problem they're dealing with here, rather than a long-term solution. … I am hopeful that CSX will come back to the table with more." (Balt. Sun)

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Collapse symbolizes deterioration of Baltimore's illustrious railroad past

For nearly two centuries, Baltimore has been a railroad town, its great eastern port and once-thriving industries sustained by the network of freight lines running inland. That legacy, however, ebbed over time as the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was subsumed and its successor, CSX Transportation, moved south. Residents and local officials say the city's prominence in the railroad industry crumbled alongside the aging tunnels, overpasses and tracks that convey trains through city neighborhoods every day. (Balt. Sun)

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Prince George’s police plan to live-tweet prostitution sting

In the coming week, Prince George’s police say, vice officers will take to the streets to arrest people suspected of soliciting prostitutes. But in an unusual twist, they’re planning to give the public an inside look at the sting operation — detailing it live on Twitter. But the plan has provoked a backlash. Critics suggest that the tactic is no more helpful to protecting the public than watching an episode of “Cops.” They also worry that the posted photos could go viral, possibly destroying the reputation of those wrongly accused as well as punishing suspects before they are convicted of a crime. (Wash. Post)

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New Baltimore County libraries chief named

A Colorado library administrator has been named director of the Baltimore County Public Library system, making her the first woman to serve in that role. Paula Miller, head of the Pikes Peak Library District in El Paso County, Colo., is set to begin the Baltimore County job this summer, the county Board of Library Trustees announced Friday. She will take over for Jim Fish, who is retiring after nearly 18 years. (Balt. Sun)

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Maryland health exchange signs up 16% of potential enrollees, 8th lowest in U.S.

Just under 67,800 people bought insurance through the Maryland Health Connection out of an estimated 419,000 potential enrollees, giving Maryland one of the lowest Affordable Care Act signup rates in the U.S. Only seven states signed up smaller portions of their potential enrollees than Maryland's 16 percent during the first enrollment period, according to a report by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Nationally, the 8 million people who signed up for insurance through health exchanges account for about 28 percent of the population considered potential enrollees. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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May 2 // Fence in the Purple Line’s path prompts Montgomery to fine trail advocate $500

The $500 fine that Montgomery County levied against Ajay Bhatt for building his backyard fence on county property might have drawn little notice, except that Bhatt isn’t just a homeowner, and it isn’t just any public land. The one-year-old fence is 14 feet beyond Bhatt’s property line, on the shoulder of a wooded recreational trail between Bethesda and Silver Spring that’s part of the planned route for a 16-mile Purple Line transitway. (Wash. Post)

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Arundel $1.35 billion budget proposal includes property tax reduction, additional police

Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman proposed a $1.35 billion budget Thursday that includes a slight decrease in property taxes and 20 additional police officers. Neuman's plan would cut the property tax rate from 95 cents per $100 of assessed value to 94.3 cents. The budget includes funding for 20 more police officers, additional hours at libraries and a 3 percent raise for teachers. It does not include funding for all of the Anne Arundel school system's requests — the school system had asked for 75 more teachers and operating costs for a new contract school for the western area of the county. (Balt. Sun)

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Implementation, Enforcement Questions Slow Ocean City’s Restricted Beach Smoking Plans

One thing seems certain — Ocean City will have a restricted smoking policy on its beach next summer, but officials will take this season to develop a plan with staff and consider public comments before passing a new law in September. (Dispatch)

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