DNA-swab case returns to Court of Appeals 

Alonzo Jay King Jr., who lost in the Supreme Court on his claim that a police swab for his DNA violated the federal Constitution, suffered another defeat Wednesday. Maryland’s top court held the cheek swab did not violate the state constitution’s ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. The swab is required under the Maryland DNA Collection Act for people arrested on charges of committing or attempting to commit a violent crime. (Daily Record)

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Montgomery residents oppose bus-only lanes for new transit system

The Montgomery County Council may be a long way from making a decision on a potential bus rapid transit system for the county, but residents aren’t wasting any time making their opinions known. A public hearing on the proposal drew a large crowd of supporters and opponents to the Council Office Building in Rockville, including 34 people who signed up to speak. (Gazette)

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Silver Spring Transit Center: hard to know whether to laugh or cry

A transportation advocacy group is trying to draw attention to the long-delayed Silver Spring Transit Center project by celebrating the fifth anniversary of when construction began. What was supposed to be a two-year, $120 million project has been delayed indefinitely because of major construction and design flaws, including cracked concrete and other structural issues. There’s an ongoing debate among Montgomery County officials, Metro officials and the developer -- Foulger Pratt -- about how to fix the center, which is supposed to be a major hub for rail and bus traffic in the area, and who will pay for those fixes and for maintaining the center once it opens. (Wash. Post)

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Oxford prepares for future stormwater infrastructure updates

The town of Oxford is faced with a decision that will affect the future of their stormwater system and flooding issues. After months of discussing and studying Oxford's stormwater and flooding issues, Sean Williamson, a research assistant with the University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center, came to Oxford on Tuesday, Sept. 24, and again on Wednesday, Sept. 25, to present the center's findings and potential solutions. (Star-Democrat)

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Next Lunar Bay Festival will not be at Harford's Steppingstone Museum

Organizers of the Lunar Bay Music and Arts Festival expect to soon secure a new and larger venue for next year's jam-band festival, after parting ways with operators of the Steppingstone Farm Museum, the venue for the inaugural 2013 festival. The inaugural two-day Lunar Bay event, with a 48-band lineup, took place in late June on the grounds of the 23-acre Steppingstone Farm Museum outside Havre de Grace. The ban moe. was the festival headliner. (Aegis)

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Sept. 25 // Baltimore County police move to keep their old guns off the street - but at a cost

As Baltimore County police replace nearly 2,000 service weapons, they won't allow the old ones to be sold in gun shops — a decision that will prevent firearms from entering the open market but could triple the agency's cost. Officials will instead try to sell the weapons to county police officers or to other law enforcement agencies, spokeswoman Elise Armacost said. (Balt. Sun)

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Pending requests won't need handgun qualification

Residents who have submitted handgun purchase applications before new requirements go into effect Oct. 1 will not have to obtain a handgun qualification license, Maryland State Police said Tuesday. The pending new law has prompted a huge increase in applications for firearm purchases, and a backlog has resulted. In the last two weeks, troopers said applications are coming in at the rate of 1,000 per day. (AP)

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Lead poisoning cases continue to decline in Maryland

The number of Maryland children poisoned by lead fell to a new low again last year, even as state officials expanded their effort to deal with a much larger pool of youngsters harboring lower levels of the harmful substance in their blood. A report released Tuesday by the Department of the Environment said 364 children statewide were found in 2012 to have dangerous levels of lead in their blood. Last year's tally of 452 had been the lowest since testing began in 1993. (Balt. Sun)

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