Board OKs $126 Million For Back River Treatment Plan

The state Board of Public Works approved Wednesday a $126 million grant to Baltimore toward upgrading the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant — part of a $686 million state and local project to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. The upgrade in technology at the city-owned plant in Baltimore County, which serves an estimated 1.3 million people in the region, is expected to reduce nitrogen pollution from the plant by two-thirds. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Carroll Considers Zoning Changes To Allow Increased Solar Uses

Carroll County planning and zoning officials have received "quite a few phone calls" from residents regarding a solar conversion facility on their property. But as the officials consider how zoning could or should be amended to allow this use, some county commissioners say not so fast. "We're talking about enabling construction of these devices on property where it's never been considered in the zoning code before," Commissioner Richard Rothschild said Tuesday. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Officials Are Warning Lutherville Residents Of An Unsafe Chemical Found In Their Drinking Water

More than 80,000 people in an area from Lutherville down to the Baltimore City line will be getting notices over the next several weeks, informing them that unsafe levels of a potentially dangerous chemical were found in their drinking water. Certain people may be at an increased risk -- such as people with compromised immune systems, infants, pregnant women, and the elderly; the head of the city's Department of Public Works says they might want to seek advice from their doctor. (WMAR-TV)

Read Full Article

New Windsor Discusses Issues Concerning Wastewater Collection System

The New Windsor Town Council received information from staff about costly issues they will have to tackle concerning the town’s wastewater collection system at their meeting Wednesday night. The town could have to pay up to $30,000 for repairs to its Main Street pumping station, which failed in late October, causing 43,000 gallons of sanitary sewer water to overflow. The town has used an emergency bypass pump since the pumping station failed. Town Manager Frank Schaeffer and other staff considered several options, but ultimately decided that repairing the station would be the most cost effective, which contractor EMH Environmental of Glenwood estimated could cost between $28,000 to $30,000. (Carr. Co. Times)

Read Full Article

Group Seeks More Regulation Of Md. Roadside Zoos

The Humane Society of the United States said Wednesday that it will ask Maryland lawmakers to tighten regulation of certain state roadside zoos to close what it called a federal enforcement loophole. Three nonprofit zoos targeted by the Washington-based animal-protection group objected to its proposal to require them to be accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums if they want to continue exhibiting big cats, bears and primates. (Herald-Mail)

Read Full Article

‘Bmore Gives More’ Surpasses $5 Million One-Day Goal

The 'Bmore Gives More' campaign exceeded its $5 million one-day fundraising goal as part of the national #GivingTuesday movement, GiveCorps announced Wednesday. Jamie McDonald, president of GiveCorps, said nearly $5.5 million was raised Tuesday. About 300 nonprofits and 200 businesses participated in the citywide effort, said McDonald, who founded GiveCorps after a career at Alex. Brown and Deutsche Bank. GiveCorps provides an online platform to raise money for charity. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

What The Bleep! Study Ranks Md. 2nd Most Potty-Mouthed State, 3rd Most Polite

Have you noticed more people around you using curse words more often?  Well, you’ve come to the right place. Marylanders, according to one group, are getting a reputation for our use of foul language. But as Mike Schuh reports, we do so very politely. (WJZ-TV)

Read Full Article

New Life For Historic Sheppard Pratt Gatehouse

Sheppard Pratt on Wednesday unveiled its newly restored historic gatehouse, which since the 1860s served as the primary entranceway to the psychiatric hospital and which will now function after a 15-month, $1.5 million renovation, as a guesthouse for visiting staff and lecturers. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article