Baltimore restaurants brace for new valet parking fees

It won’t be long before restaurants in downtown Baltimore and some of their guests are facing extra charges for valet parking. The Baltimore Board of Estimates has approved fees associated with new valet parking regulations that will be phased into 10 neighborhoods during the next two years. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Naval Academy Museum to close Mondays for furloughs

The Naval Academy Museum is now a casualty of Defense Department furloughs. The museum in Preble Hall, normally a seven-day operation, will be closed on Mondays through Sept. 29, an academy spokeswoman said Friday. (Balt. Sun)

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Dundalk residents, ex-officials criticize Kamenetz's handling of property sales

For three months, Baltimore County officials have been weighing proposals from developers to buy three parcels of county-owned land, in Towson, Dundalk and Randallstown. But county officials are releasing little information about the deliberations — they won't even say who serves on the committee evaluating the eight bids that were received. That has triggered criticism from some residents and former officials. (Balt. Sun)

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Ocean City area dolphin count rebounds

Dolphin sightings off Maryland's Atlantic beaches have rebounded after a dismal tally last summer. Volunteers and staff of the National Aquarium spotted 113 of the marine mammals during their annual count Friday, up from just 31 seen this time last year. (Balt. Sun)   

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Treatment homes raise concerns in Crownsville neighborhood

The presence of two rehabilitation facilities in one Crownsville neighborhood has unleashed concerns from residents about traffic congestion and the possibility more treatment centers will come to the 14-home community. Operators of the Serenity Acres Treatment Center, which owns two adjacent houses in Martins Grant, say their facilities are within the parameters of the Fair Housing Act. (Capital)

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Oliver leader quits board after military record questioned

Earl L. Johnson appeared to be the ideal face for a broad effort by current and former service members to clean up his troubled East Baltimore neighborhood of Oliver. The charismatic veteran told stories of serving for years with the elite Army Rangers, fighting in Bosnia and Iraq. Problem was, his stories turned out not to be true. Johnson, 32, now acknowledges that he significantly exaggerated his military resume, in part to conceal his criminal past. The recent revelations have split the community of volunteers in Oliver, one of Baltimore's most persistently crime-ridden areas. (Balt. Sun)

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Trees can help with soot pollution, study finds

Trees do more than just clear the air and provide shade from the hot summer sun. Though no panacea, they can make cities like Baltimore healthier, a recent study suggests. Using computer modeling to quantify the health benefits of trees in 10 cities, including Baltimore, researchers with the U.S. Forest Service and a private think tank say leafy foliage in urban areas can scrub enough soot out of the air to reduce asthma attacks, emergency room visits and even deaths. (Balt. Sun) 

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Is Annapolis Compromise Street plan back?

Prospective buyers who seemed to wipe their hands clean of a proposal to redevelop a property on Annapolis’ City Dock might not be gone for good. Mayor Josh Cohen said Mark Ordan, who was heading up a development team for the old Fawcett Boat Supplies site, will be meeting with some historic preservation advocates to discuss how a project could fit in with the character and scale of downtown. (Capital)

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