1960 Md. sit-in case remembered as part of history

Robert M. Bell was 16 years old when he recruited classmates to join a sit-in at a downtown Baltimore restaurant. The sit-in was Bell's first, and he remembers being a little nervous. On the afternoon of June 17, 1960, the group entered Hooper's restaurant, and a hostess said she wouldn't seat them. "I'm sorry, but we haven't integrated as yet," she said. The group pushed past her and sat anyway. Police were called, and 12 demonstrators, including Bell, were charged with trespassing. Eventually, the case made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Capital)

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Md. Plant Adds Features To Prevent Sewage Overflow

Howard County Executive Ken Ulman plans to break ground on backup generators and solar panels that will be installed at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant. Last year, Hurricane Sandy knocked out electrical lines to the plant, causing a large overflow of untreated sewage. Ulman said at the time that such an overflow should never happen again. (CBS-AP)

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Grant targets continuing lead poisoning threats in Baltimore

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $30,000 to help educate Baltimore families about the risks to young children of lead poisoning, which despite progress made in reducing exposure over the years still affects nearly 3,000 youngsters across Maryland. Shawn Garvin, EPA's Mid-Atlantic regional administrator, announced the grant Thursday at a press conference marking National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week. The funds go to Green & Healthy Home Initiative, the new name for the Baltimore-based Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning. (Balt. Sun)

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Wicomico County elaborates on mug shot policy

Wicomico County officials say the question of whether to provide mug shots to news organizations was not the sole reason a jail staff member told The Daily Times this week the policy was “under review.” County Attorney Ed Baker said the county began looking into the laws that determine when and how the county has to provide arrest records and mug shots to the public in July. He cited the national phenomenon of websites that collect and post mug shots from around the country; many charge people fees to have them removed. (Daily Times)

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Annapolis restaurants fork over politics

Chick & Ruth’s Delly has a menu featuring state and local politicians, but that’s as far as it will go into politics. Not that owner Ted Levitt doesn’t have his voting preferences - he’s just keeping them to himself. And he’s not against hosting fundraisers or parties for candidates, it’s just that he hasn’t been asked. (Capital)

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Frederick Man President-Elect Of Md. Dental Group

Dental problems are the second most common reason people show up at the Frederick Memorial Hospital emergency room. Preventive care and better health programs could help reduce those visits, according to the president-elect of the Maryland Dental Association. Dr. Richard Rogers, whose office is in Frederick, will serve a three-year term, from president-elect to president, then immediate past president, all with distinct duties within the state association. (News-Post-CBS)

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Baltimore woman gleeful about making music to help sick children

In the summer of 2008, When Leora Friedman was 15 and her sister Ariela was 19, the sisters led a song-writing workshop for patients and families of the Hackerman-Patz House, a Baltimore residence for children receiving limb-lengthening surgery at Sinai Hospital. Working with a $500 grant from the Johns Hopkins University, the Friedman sisters donated instruments, wrote songs and performed with the seriously ill youngsters. The result was an album, "A Friend Like You," filled with original songs. (Balt. Sun)

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Oct. 25 // Maryland, other states vow to boost plug-in car sales

Aiming to boost the fledgling market for plug-in vehicles, Maryland and seven other states pledged Thursday to use their governments' tax and spending powers to get 3.3 million "zero-emission" cars, trucks and vans on the road in the next dozen years. Gov. Martin O'Malley and his counterparts in California, Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont formally vowed to promote plug-in or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in their states. (Balt. Sun)

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