Salisbury residents may appeal public water plan

Homeowners in the Morris Mill and Coulbourne Woods subdivisions who have well water contaminated with trichloroethylene — and those who don’t — will be able to meet with county officials Monday to learn about the proposal to extend public water to the entire neighborhood. The meeting at the Wicomico Youth & Civic Center will be the first chance for homeowners to interact with the county council since they voted to move forward with the project in September. (Daily Times)

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Trees to be planted in Carroll in effort to cut pollution to bay

Residents will be seeing a lot more greenery as the Maryland State Highway Administration looks to plant more than 9,300 trees in Carroll County. The effort is part of the state’s Reclaim the Bay Program, a public awareness campaign aimed at spreading the word about the pollution issues associated with the Chesapeake Bay. The agency will plant 55,000 trees in Carroll, Frederick and Howard counties as part of the project. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Annapolis City Dock Master Plan heads to public approval

The City Dock Master Plan is now in the hands of the citizens of Annapolis. The Annapolis City Council approved final amendments to the plan in a 4½-hour meeting Thursday afternoon. A public hearing is scheduled for Oct. 21 at City Council chambers. (Capital)

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'Deep Web' drug kingpin tried to kill witness, authorities in Maryland say

An undercover federal agent in Maryland played a key role in the shutdown Wednesday of what authorities describe as a massive online drug marketplace called the Silk Road, whose owner allegedly began scheming to kill perceived rivals. Authorities say Ross William Ulbricht, a 29-year-old San Francisco engineer with a physics degree, built his site into the Amazon of illegal narcotics. He is accused of serving “several thousand drug dealers” since January 2011, with sales exceeding $1 billion and transactions occurring with a virtual currency called Bitcoin. (Balt. Sun)

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Winning $189 million Mega Millions ticket sold in Maryland

When Sukhwinder Singh got the call at 6 a.m. Wednesday that his Dash In convenience store in Severn had sold a winning $189 million Mega Millions jackpot ticket, his reaction was understandable. "I thought it was somebody joking with me," said the Glen Burnie man, who owns the Severn store and three others. Reality sank in when lottery officials arrived to take pictures and hang a banner reading "We sold a jackpot winner" outside his store. (Balt. Sun)

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Chevy Chase gives B-CC Rescue Squad $60,000, well short of request

The night John Fleder of Chevy Chase had chest pains and called 911, he wasn’t thinking of how the Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rescue Squad paid for its fleet of seven ambulances. He just knew he needed the squad to transport him to the hospital, where he found out that he was having a massive heart attack. “They were professional and calm and calming. They almost certainly saved my life,” Fleder said. So for Fleder and council members Al Lang and John Bickerman, dipping into the town’s surplus of $8 million to fulfill the squad’s request for $230,000 to pay for a new ambulance is a no-brainer. Others in the town and the council have disagreed. (Gazette)

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State grant will fund bikeway improvements near UMBC

As part of the Maryland Bikeways Program, Gov. Martin O’Malley announced a $79,600 grant to fund improvements in the bicycle system near University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The grant was part of a $3.2 million announcement to fund 23 projects in four counties, according to a press release from the Maryland Department of Transportation. The grant will provide increased signage, bike lanes and shared road arrows in the southwest part of the county, providing a safer environment for residents to use cycling as a greener form of transportation. (Balt. Sun)

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Oct. 11 // Baltimore Marathon to see increased security after Boston attacks

City police and organizers of this weekend's Baltimore Running Festival say they are stepping up security after explosions shook the end of the Boston race this spring, joining other recent running events that have placed restrictions around the finish line. Baltimore's race comes as the busy fall marathon season enters full swing for the first time since the Boston attacks, and officials are trying to ensure public safety without detracting from the celebratory atmosphere that marks distance running events. (Balt. Sun)

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