Carroll Hospital's neonatal couplet care rooms a 'new model of care' to help sick, premature babies bond

The latest step in the renovation of the Family Birthing Center at Carroll Hospital is designed to benefit babies who require more complicated care after birth. Hospital staff hopes keeping them close to their families will improve the experience and even shorten the length of hospital stay for some babies.(Carr. Co. Times)

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Maryland State Highway Administration Has Already Spent $2.1M On Pothole Repairs This Year

Pothole problems continue in Maryland, as road crews scramble to keep up with the constant crumble and more drivers are ending up in the shop. Thanks to rain and snow, crews are struggling to handle the demand, and it’s costing drivers. However, business is booming at body shops across the state, fixing the bent rims and bubbled tires. “Tire damage, rim damage, suspension damage,” said Christopher Storms with AAA. (WJZ-TV)

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In tax forms, Maryland hospital system labeled book purchase from Baltimore mayor a 'grant' to city schools

The University of Maryland Medical System classified its two most recent purchases of books from Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh as “grants” in federal tax filings — one to the city public school system in 2017 and one to the Democrat’s Healthy Holly company in 2015, tax documents show. Several tax experts said the medical center did not follow basic reporting rules for tax-exempt organizations by labeling as grants what the nonprofit hospital has called purchases it made from Pugh’s private company. (Balt. Sun) 

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Baltimore considering extending contract, boosting pay for consultant to find police candidates

Baltimore’s spending board on Wednesday will consider a contract extension and pay raise — to $100,000 a year — for Tyrone Powers, a former FBI agent and consultant to Mayor Catherine Pugh who the city uses to help identify potential police hires. The Board of Estimates first approved a $90,000 contract between Powers and the Mayor’s Office of African American Male Engagement in July 2018. On its agenda for Wednesday is a proposal to extend that contract for two more years, paying Powers $95,000 the first year and $100,000 the second. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore just saw the worst spike of sleep-related infant deaths since 2009 — sparking review of program

During a six-week stretch in December and January, six infants died in their sleep in homes around Baltimore. It was the worst spate of sleep-related infant fatalities since the city began a campaign in 2009 to teach new mothers how to avoid such a tragedy, and health officials say they are trying to understand what happened and how to bolster the program. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore City Council concerned by police overtime spending, which is expected to be $48.63M for fiscal year

The Baltimore Police Department is again expected to spend millions of dollars on overtime this year, but Commissioner Michael Harrison has pledged increased oversight to curb costs. The department has spent $33.67 million and is expected to spend $48.63 million on overtime for the fiscal year ending in June, according to projections the department provided to members of the City Council’s budget committee. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore remains the least healthy place in Maryland, Montgomery the most in latest annual ranking

Baltimore City remains the least healthy jurisdiction in Maryland and Montgomery County is the healthiest, according to the latest ranking from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The groups take an annual look at drivers of health, going beyond access to health care and life expectancy, to include such measures as housing costs and children living in poverty. The top and bottom of the rankings in Maryland have changed little in recent years. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore among nation's most gentrified cities, study shows

Baltimore is among seven U.S. cities that accounted for nearly half the country’s gentrification between 2000 and 2013, according to a new study. Researchers with the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, a Washington-based nonprofit, examined census data for 935 metropolitan areas in the U.S. They found gentrification — investment that led to rising home prices, incomes and education levels of residents — was most intense in large coastal cities, and it was concentrated in larger cities with vibrant economies. (Balt. Sun)

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