Ashburn, Ellicott City high on ‘best places to live’ list

Money Magazine’s annual list of The Best Places to Live in America ranks Ashburn, Virginia, No. 2 and Ellicott City, Maryland, No. 4. Money Magazine considers a long list of criteria in ranking its Best Places to Live list, with the greatest weight on economic health, public schools, local amenities, housing, cost of living and diversity. The rankings are also based on researcher visits to communities and interviews with residents. (WTOP)

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September 19 // Officials break ground on $2.5 million stable for Baltimore Police mounted unit

Baltimore and B&O Railroad Museum officials held a ceremonial groundbreaking Tuesday for a $2.5 million stable for the country’s oldest continuously operating mounted police unit — and the museum’s board of directors announced plans to donate money to acquire two new horses. The Baltimore Police Department mounted unit, in its 130th year, is made up of six horses — Big D, Pax, Porter, Slurpee, Blair and Hercules — which were deployed for crowd control at 175 community events last year. Hercules is retiring, but a roughly $10,000-to-$13,000 donation from the museum will add two new horses. (Balt. Sun)

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Former Baltimore councilman honored

Ken Harris grew up in Park Heights. He often credited a recreation center for helping him grow into the man who would go on to work for Baltimore as a city councilman, which he did. But his life was cut short when he was gunned down 10 years ago. Tuesday, his legacy was solidified in the community. The Kenneth  N. Harris Senior Community Center will be a place where young people can learn, play and achieve. Tuesday afternoon, everyone from Mayor Catherine Pugh and current city council members to his family took pride in dedicating the facility to him. (WMAR)

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Residents back flood-control plan to tear down Ellicott City buildings

Sixty-six people testified during a marathon Howard County Council legislative hearing Monday night on plans to mitigate flooding in historic Ellicott City. The council is considering three bills needed for a five-year flood control plan that would raze 19 buildings to expand a channel for the Tiber River and replace them with open space. The $50 million plan to demolish the structures requires approval from the county’s Historic Preservation Commission, a majority vote by the council and approval from the county executive. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Orioles make history with Braille jerseys

Although the Orioles are having a losing season, they are taking the lead as the first team in American professional sports history to incorporate Braille lettering into game day jerseys.  "For us to be the first is really cool to bring awareness to the cause," Orioles pitcher Mike Wright said. The jerseys celebrate the 40th anniversary of the National Federation of the Blind moving its headquarters to Baltimore.  The team, the federation and fans are excited about the statement. The first 15,000 people to the game got free Braille alphabet cards handed out by members from the federation. (WMAR)

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Baltimore Symphony principal oboist files sexual harassment complaint against concertmaster

The principal oboist of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has filed a sexual harassment complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission against BSO concertmaster Jonathan Carney. Katherine Needleman alleges in the filing that Carney retaliated against her after she rejected his advances in 2005, and that the orchestra allowed a hostile work environment since then. Publicly naming Carney now “is the scariest thing I have ever done,” Needleman said in a statement. (Balt. Sun)

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Westminster officials review monumental wastewater project at special council meeting

The Westminster Mayor and Common Council convened Monday, Sept. 17 to go over the latest details concerning the biggest project in city history — an approximately $70-million overhaul of its wastewater treatment facility. A considerable revamping of the city’s wastewater treatment facility has been in the works for more than a decade, with stricter nitrogen and phosphorus emission targets resulting from the second Chesapeake Bay Agreement in 2000. The agreement, which built upon nutrient reduction initiatives achieved under the inaugural 1983 bay agreement, strives for better water quality. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Grant to help teach children about opioid dangers

The Hagerstown Police Athletic League will receive a portion of a $250,000 state grant to help teach children about the dangers of opioid use. Ashley Roush, coordinator of PAL's Play Hard Live Clean program, said Tuesday that Hagerstown's share of the grant will be about $20,000. That money will be used, she said, to help fund three large events and smaller "pop-up" events to teach middle school students the importance of staying away from opioids. "We need some community outreach and prevention," she said. (Herald-Mail)

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