'One Call Away': Somerset creates overdose awareness lip sync video

When it comes to substance abuse and the opioid epidemic, Somerset County emergency responders have a message for you: they're just "One Call Away." That's the popular Charlie Puth song featured in an overdose awareness lip sync video published Thursday morning on the Somerset County Emergency Services Facebook page. By 5 p.m., the video, which is a little less than four minutes long, had already been viewed at least 5,000 times and shared more than 250 times. (Daily Times)

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November 9 // Baltimore's civil rights office gets new head amid legal dispute between police oversight panel, city solicitor

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh has chosen Darnell Ingram, an administrator from Georgetown University, as director of the city’s Office of Civil Rights amid a bitter legal dispute between the city’s top lawyer and a police oversight panel that receives administrative support from the office. City Solicitor Andre Davis, who was closely involved in Ingram’s selection and confirmed his appointment, said Ingram’s background as both an engineer and a lawyer makes him a strategic thinker and good communicator. (Balt. Sun)

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Hundreds in Baltimore area turn out for 'Nobody is Above the Law' protests aimed at protecting Mueller probe

Hundreds protested in Baltimore, Catonsville, Bel Air and elsewhere Thursday as part of a national response to fears that President Donald Trump will quash the Russia investigation. The “Nobody is Above the Law” protests were coordinated to take place in cities across the United States at 5 p.m., through MoveOn.org as a “rapid response” to Trump’s firing of Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his replacement with loyalist Matt Whitaker. (Balt. Sun)

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Will Calvin Ball put the brakes on Ellicott City flood control plan, shift other priorities?

As he prepares to move into the county executive’s suite in less than a month, Calvin Ball says he needs more information before deciding if he will get behind a $50 million plan that could dramatically remake historic Ellicott City to better protect against major flooding. Ball, a Democrat who upset Republican Allan Kittleman, has spent a dozen years on the County Council, where he hewed what some consider a progressive path on social issues, urged restraint in development and zoning and touted the importance of maintaining a quality school system. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Elrich offers his help as future county executive to settle Bethesda cemetery debate

In his first public appearance since winning the county executive race Tuesday, Marc Elrich Wednesday said he intends to serve as a liaison between the county Housing Opportunity Commission (HOC) and a group that opposes development near a historic Bethesda cemetery when he is sworn into office. Elrich, who won Tuesday’s election by securing about 65 percent of Montgomery County votes, was invited to a HOC meeting in Kensington by members of Macedonia Baptist Church (MBC), who have for years protested development on an African American burial ground on River Road. (Bethesda)

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Here's how Maryland hospitals fared on latest safety report card

Maryland hospitals were safer for patients this fall than they were six months ago, according to the latest assessment from the Leapfrog Group. Maryland ranked 38th of all states for safety in the group’s biannual Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grades, with 20 percent of Maryland hospitals receiving the highest grade of A for patient safety. (Balt. Sun)

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More bad news for Maryland from all that rain: smaller oysters this year, and less of them

As shucking season begins, the forecast for Chesapeake Bay oysters is worrisome. Record rainfall has made the water less salty — and oysters need salt to thrive. Harvesters may find fewer of them this year, and many will be too small. And the impact on the struggling shellfish could go well beyond this winter. If climate change means spring and summer deluges become more common, that will be one more obstacle to the effort to rebuild the bay’s once-thriving oyster population. (Balt. Sun)

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Some Maryland workers turn heavily to opioids when injured, study finds

Close to a third of Maryland workers who filed injury compensation claims in recent years continued to rely on highly addictive opioid painkillers three months after they were hurt, according to a recent study by University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers. Excessive use of painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin, along with use of the illegal opioids herion and fenantyl, has been cited in the opioid overdose crisis around the nation that has led to tens of thousands of deaths a year. (Balt. Sun)

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