With cases up, Washington region steps up coronavirus restrictions and enforcement

As coronavirus cases in the Washington region rose over the weekend, authorities continued trying to balance public appeals and enforcement to address violations of mask mandates and other health regulations meant to keep residents safe. On Sunday, confirmed cases in the region were up more than 3,100, including 1,840 in Maryland, 1,161 in Virginia and 163 in the District. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Bel Air town commissioners extend public comment session on annexation to next meeting; no vote taken

The Bel Air Board of Town Commissioners has extended its public hearing session on the proposed annexation of a 1.46-acre field near the Liriodendron Mansion and also postponed a vote on the annexation’s approval. The public hearing will continue at the board’s next meeting, which has not yet been scheduled. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

Anne Arundel council passes amended law enforcement support resolution after dozens of residents weigh in

The Anne Arundel County Council passed a resolution supporting local law enforcement officers Monday night after controversial clauses were amended out and added language encouraging policy change and other efforts to move local law enforcement practices toward increased equity, transparency and mutual trust. The vote came after a lengthy public comment period and a tense discussion among councilmembers, the county sheriff and acting police chief. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

Maryland sees 12th consecutive day of 1,000 or more cases

Sunday marks the 12th straight day coronavirus case numbers have increased by at least 1,000 new cases. Maryland health officials announced Sunday that they have recorded 165,930 cases of the coronavirus. That was 1,840 more new cases than the day before. Saturday morning, the Maryland Department of Health released data showing that there were 2,321 more new cases since Friday. It was the first time since the pandemic started that Maryland surpassed 2,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day. (WBAL)

Read Full Article

Maryland courts cancel jury trials for the rest of 2020 as coronavirus cases spike

As coronavirus cases continue to surge nationwide and across the Washington region, the Maryland Judiciary announced last week that it will reimpose certain restrictions on court operations — shifting some proceedings back online and halting jury trials through the end of the year. Since early October, the courts had been operating normally under the freedom designated in the judiciary’s fifth phase of progressive reopening, which allowed courts to abandon virtual hearings in favor of in-person courtroom interactions with mask-wearing and social distancing. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Baltimore expected to pay $8 million to settle Gun Trace Task Force lawsuit

Baltimore's spending board is being asked to approve a nearly $8 million settlement to two men who served federal prison time after having drugs planted on them in 2010, a case unearthed through the Gun Trace Task Force corruption investigation. The settlement for Umar Burley and Brent Matthews is the largest yet to be approved in recent weeks for claims related to the case and eclipses the amount paid to the family of Freddie Gray in 2015. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Healing Youth Alliance helps Baltimore's youth heal from trauma

Violence, incarceration, broken families and poverty all lead to trauma in Baltimore's Black communities. Since last April, the University of Maryland School of Social Work partnered with the Black Mental Health Alliance and HeartSmiles to provide healing-centered engagement for the city's youth. "So, I've been growing up in Baltimore for all my life and I've lost many friends to gun violence, and seeing poverty and drugs in my community, honestly, has been really traumatizing for me," Young Elder said. (WBAL)

Read Full Article

Local Filmmaker explores historical lynchings in Montgomery County

There are a lot of unknowns in the documentary, “The Three (Known) Lynchings of Montgomery County, Maryland,” as director and writer Jay Mallin found out when he began uncovering the public records of three men, George Peck, John Diggs and Sidney Randolph. Mallin said Bryan Stevenson’s book, “Just Mercy” prompted him to take a look at the historical records of the late 1800s in Montgomery County, after Stevenson encouraged readers to discover lynchings in their own neighborhoods at the end of the book. (WTOP)

Read Full Article