Rapid COVID-19 tests now available in some Maryland doctors’ offices but questions about accuracy persist

Six months into the coronavirus pandemic, testing is moving from mass drive-thru centers and hospitals to doctors’ offices, where the wait time for results is 15 minutes rather than days or longer. More and faster tests will be a convenience for the public and a boon for officials trying to get a handle on cases, but doctors warn such rapid “point-of-care” tests come with challenges. (Balt Sun)

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Citizen Recycling Drop-Off Into Second Week As Agency Considers Additional Sites, Longer Hours

Baltimore City Public Works officials will wait until Friday to assess how recycling drop-off sites are faring, agency officials told WJZ. The city’s Public Works Acting Director Matthew Garbark last month announced the city would temporarily stop residential recycling collection so its crews could focus on trash collection. Currently, a dozen “drop-off” sites across the city are open from 7 a.m. through 3 p.m. Several others are open until 5 p.m and 7 p.m. Click here for a list of those locations and hours. (WJZ-TV)

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Rapid COVID-19 tests now available in some Maryland doctors’ offices

Six months into the coronavirus pandemic, testing is moving from mass drive-through centers and hospitals to doctors’ offices, where the wait time for results is 15 minutes rather than days or longer. More and faster tests will be a convenience for the public and a boon for officials trying to get a handle on cases, but doctors warn such rapid “point-of-care” tests come with challenges. “The answer to this pandemic is test, test, test,” said Dr. Ron Elfenbein, medical director and CEO of Chesapeake Urgent Care in Gambrills. “And we’re having good results. ...But these tests aren’t perfect.” (Balt. Sun)

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Unemployed Marylanders Anxiously Waiting for Extra $300 Per Week

The kids are starting to notice that something's off. Their dad, 26-year-old Nick Brewer, is distracted. He's trying to keep his young family of five going on $120 a week in unemployment payments from Maryland's Department of Labor. Brewer hopes he'll start receiving more money soon. But like thousands of other Marylanders on unemployment, he's stuck in a gap between federal jobless benefits. (Salisbury)

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Carroll County commissioners look to expand community solar options

Carroll County commissioners are exploring expanding zoning code to allow small community solar projects on agricultural land. The Board of Commissioners on Thursday unanimously voted to send a proposed zoning code amendment to the planning and zoning commission. The amendment, if approved, would permit community solar on land between five and 20 acres on agricultural remainders — the land leftover after residential subdivision lots have been created in an agricultural zone. The amendment would limit each community solar development to a maximum of two megawatts, which is imposed by state law. (Balt. Sun)

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The Orioles are bunting at a league-leading rate. How often does it actually work out?

When Orioles manager Brandon Hyde said that the team’s proclivity for bunting is personnel-driven as opposed to a philosophy, it’s pretty clear why. With the absences of José Iglesias (sore hamstring) and Austin Hays (fractured rib), the team has found more playing time for Cedric Mullins and Andrew Velazquez, who are the fastest players on the team and have proved the ability to lay down a bunt. (Balt.Sun)

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Maryland reports highest rate of new coronavirus cases in 10-19 age range Thursday; 693 total cases added

As Maryland prepares to enter the third stage of its reopening process and another school year gets underway, the percentage of new coronavirus cases among 10- to 19-year-olds reached its highest level yet Thursday. Of the 693 new infections the state confirmed Thursday, 121 were found in those at least 10 years old but younger than 20. Only once has the daily count in that age range exceeded Thursday’s number, when there were 135 on July 31. (Balt Sun)

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Prince George’s joins Montgomery in opting out of Maryland’s move to Phase 3

Maryland is moving to its third phase of economic recovery Friday afternoon, but the state’s Washington suburbs have decided to stay put.  Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks (D) announced Thursday that the county will opt out of Republican Gov. Larry Hogan’s plans for Phase 3. Prince George’s will join Montgomery County and Baltimore City in remaining in the second recovery phase, with leaders saying that the coronavirus isn’t contained at levels that would safely allow lifting restrictions. (Wash Post)

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