Last Of Whooping Cranes Depart From Maryland Breeding Program

The last of a flock of 75 whooping cranes has left a U.S. Geological Survey site in Maryland, marking the end of a 52-year-old breeding program. The Baltimore Sun reports that the federal agency says the last bird has been transferred from the Patuxent Research Refuge. There were fewer than 50 whooping cranes alive when the breeding program began with a one-winged bird named Canus in the 1960s. (WJZ-TV)

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Carroll County approves $350K plan to eradicate zebra mussels from Hyde's Quarry

The county approved a $349,966 plan to eradicate the zebra mussels that have been dwelling and reproducing in Hyde’s Quarry for at least three years. Maryland’s Department of Natural Resources confirmed that the mussels — an invasive species that has not been seen on inland Maryland before — were present in the Westminster quarry last May. Since then, the Carroll County Land and Resource Management Department has been seeking a way to remove them before the warm reproductive season, and before they spread to any other water bodies. (Carroll County Times)

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Baltimore's largest methadone clinic to remain open despite visit from federal agents, its president says

The man who runs the city’s largest methadone clinic said it would remain open despite the presence of federal agents at the Turning Point Clinic locations in Baltimore and Columbia. “We’re definitely open for business,” said the Rev. Milton Emanuel Williams Jr., sitting inside the East Baltimore clinic Thursday night while police cleared the building. Williams, the clinic’s president, said 10 Drug Enforcement Administration agents had arrived that morning in an unannounced visit to review medication logs and other records of methadone treatments. (Balt. Sun)

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Pappas family puts $100,000 toward mobile app to improve police relationship with youth in Baltimore area

The Pappas family, famous for its Baltimore-area seafood restaurants and catering service — and especially for its crab cakes — says it has invested $100,000 into a mobile app designed to improve relationships between cops and kids. The PAPP app, which is still in development, rewards police officers and local youth who engage in specified tasks — such as walking the kids’ neighborhoods together — with vouchers to Pappas restaurants or other participating businesses, said Daniel Burgess, president of the family’s nonprofit Mark Pappas Foundation. (Balt. Sun)

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Medically treating opioid use disorder in prison saves lives

In Maryland, opioid overdoses now kill more people each year than guns and car crashes combined. With more than 2,000 deaths in 2017, Maryland ranks among the five states with the highest rates of opioid-related overdose deaths at double the national average. The state needs to make progress in saving lives — and fast. A terrific opportunity is the Medication Assisted Treatment in Detention Act (House Bill 116/ Senate Bill 846). This legislation would require jails and prisons in Maryland to provide access to all three FDA-approved medications for opioid use disorder to individuals during incarceration. With some modest improvements, the legislation, if passed, could begin driving overdoses down within a year of implementation. (Balt. Sun)

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Howard County launches 'It's OK to Ask' campaign to combat youth suicide

Whenever Sara Tagget shares her personal story of her daughter who killed herself a decade ago, it allows the mother to get her daughter back for a moment. “It’s hard to talk about her, but we all like to talk about our kids [and] why is mine any different? She’s just not here, but she’s still my baby girl,” Tagget said. “When she died the love didn’t die.” On Sept. 20, 2008, at the age of 21, Katrina Tagget took her life during her senior year at Michigan State University. Katrina was a graduate of Centennial High School in Ellicott City. As Katrina was growing up, her mother and family “thought she was just a moody teenager.” (Ho. Co. Times)

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Baltimore mayor takes an excavator to kick off the demolition of block of vacant homes in Druid Heights

Operating the bucket of an excavator, Mayor Catherine Pugh clawed down the front wall Wednesday of 516 Baker Street, a 99-year-old brick rowhouse in a blighted section of West Baltimore where redevelopment is planned. Work crews from Humanim had been inside the house and about a dozen others on the block to salvage the yellow pine wood floors and other valuable building material, hollowing them out in preparation for the demolition. On the Druid Heights site, developers are planning an expansion of the Bakers View Townhomes community for families with low to moderate incomes. A park is planned for the opposite side of Baker Street. (Balt. Sun)

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BWI Feeling Impact Of FAA’s Emergency Order To Ground Boeing Jets

Maryland is feeling the effects of flight cancelations and delays as a result of the FAA’s emergency order to ground Boeing 737 Max planes Wednesday. BWI Thurgood Airport is one of the largest hubs for Southwest Airlines. Moments after President Trump’s announcement, a Southwest Boeing 737 Max 8 plane was grounded. “It was odd, that we were one of the last to be grounded,” Bobby Barhan, a traveler, said. “It’s good that we were finally grounded.” Travelers like Miranda Myford said she double-checked her Southwest ticket to Atlanta before going to the airport. (WJZ-TV)

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