Annapolis lines up Good Charlotte for festival honoring press freedom

Good Charlotte, a pop-punk band with deep Maryland roots, is the first major act committed to a music festival honoring press freedom in Annapolis. After Mayor Gavin Buckley announced last week his intent to host a large-scale event, City Hall staffers began working the logistics of closing off streets, booking speakers and bands and bracing for a crush of people. The festival is scheduled for July 28, one month after a shooting at the Capital Gazette newsroom that killed five people. (Capital)

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Project to protect Baltimore City’s drinking water has so far compromised it

It was a price that seemed too good to be true. At her first Board of Estimates meeting as Baltimore’s mayor in 2016, Catherine Pugh was asked to approve a contract for installing covered water tanks at Druid Hill Park’s reservoir to comply with federal regulations. City engineers had estimated the project would cost $156 million. But in came a bid of just $134 million from a newcomer to Baltimore contracting circles. Oscar Renda Contracting of Roanoke, Texas, beat out its closest competitor by $10 million. Recommended by the Department of Public Works, the new mayor and her colleagues unanimously approved the contract on December 7, 2016. Eighteen months later, a project designed to safeguard the region’s drinking water has managed to jeopardize the purity of a key part of the water system. (Brew)

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Washington Co. strikes out with request for more flood-damage reimbursement

A section of Garretts Mill Road could reopen in late March, while part of Back Road still is expected to be closed for a year after mid-May floods that devastated several roads in southern Washington County. Washington County officials also heard back from the federal government that the county won't be reimbursed at a 90 percent rate for flood-related damage to public property, R. David Hays, the county's emergency-services director, said in an email. The county will get 75 percent of eligible costs reimbursed, but officials had lobbied for more. (Herald-Mail)

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Surprise helicopter landing in OC a head scratcher for officials

An unanticipated private helicopter landing on a downtown church parking lot last week had resort officials this week exploring ways to ensure it doesn’t happen again. Last Tuesday, on the eve of the Fourth of July holiday, a private helicopter landed on the St. Mary Star of the Sea’s parking lot at 17th Street and Philadelphia Avenue, discharged its passengers and took off again. The unexpected landing disrupted traffic in the and generally created quite a stir for hundreds of motorists and pedestrians unaccustomed to a helicopter touching down in a densely populated resort area. (Dispatch)

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Wide search expected for new Howard fire chief

Howard County will search inside and outside the county for a new fire chief, an aide to the county executive said Wednesday night. John Butler, the county’s first African-American chief who worked his way up the ranks of Howard’s fire and rescue service, is leaving this summer to take command of the larger Fairfax County, Va., fire department, officials announced Wednesday. (Ho. Co. Times)

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July 11 // At least one of the youngest migrant children sent to Maryland will be reunited with family by court deadline

The Trump administration on Tuesday appeared to significantly pull back from its “zero tolerance” immigration policy as it rushed to reunite families to satisfy a court order, saying it will largely release families with ankle bracelet monitoring rather than indefinitely detaining the migrant children and parents together. Administration officials said just 38 of 102 children under age 5 were expected to be reunited with their families by Tuesday, the deadline set by a U.S. District Court judge in San Diego. At least one of the young migrant children sent to Maryland facilities was expected to be reunited with relatives on Tuesday, according to a foster agency involved in the process. (Balt. Sun)

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Journalists from across the country line up to help the Capital Gazette after newsroom massacre

Journalism is a competitive field. Getting the story first and right is gold. Spouses and friends who work for competing news outlets have been known to use sharp elbows with each other. But after the horrific shooting at the Capital Gazette, in which five staffers were killed on June 28 in the newsroom near Annapolis, Md., journalists from across the country — the New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR, the Boston Globe and others — have been lining up to help the community newspaper. Dozens of journalists emailed the paper and asked what they could do, and others simply showed up and said, “Put me to work.” (Wash. Post)

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More city apartments could mean less parking

People in the Fells Point and Canton area of the city are fired up after news of a potential apartment building that could bring more people, and less parking. The proposed five-story building in the 500 block of Washington Street would bring 40 new units, or potentially 80 new tenants, according to a flyer posted in the neighborhoods. The problem that has residents upset is with 80 people potentially coming into the city, the apartment complex only plans on providing 18 parking spots. (WMAR)

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