GBC Leader Hails Crime Plan

In a commentary, the president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee hailed the crime reduction strategy issued by Police Commissioner Michael Harrison. "Baltimore continues to see a high rates of violent crime, especially shootings and homicides," Don Fry said. "But a crime reduction strategy issued by the city's new police commissioner provides a road map to bring about change." Fry went on to commend Harrison's crime strategy for its "two-pronged" approach focusing on both long-term and short-term issues. (WBAL)

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FCC authorizes nearly $2.9 million for broadband in Garrett County

The Federal Communications Commission authorized nearly $2.9 million in funding over the next decade to expand broadband to 2,454 homes and businesses in rural Garrett County Monday. The provider, Declaration Networks Group, will begin receiving funding later this month. “Obviously, we are very happy that DNG is receiving funding, as we have prioritized expanding broadband access for several years now,” Garrett County Commissioner Paul Edwards said. “DNG has been a great partner in that with us, and significant financial investment is needed to get to service to some of Garrett County’s more remote locations. This money helps make some of that possible.” (Times-News)

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Maryland court rules for state against Carroll County in pollution permit challenge

In the latest development in an appeals process that has stretched over multiple years, the Maryland Court of Appeals sided against Carroll County’s objections to runoff pollution regulations in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The Maryland Department of the Environment, or MDE, is charged with issuing Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System or MS4 permits, which oversee the systems that collect stormwater and dispense it into local waterways. The permits break down each county’s obligations to reduce pollution in those waterways. Carroll County and Frederick County each raised challenges to some sections of the most recent permit, issued in 2014. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Md. Public Service Commission takes first step to changing way Maryland utilities set rates

The Maryland Public Service Commission took its first step toward changing the way utility companies such as Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. set rates — a move the regulator said will provide more certainty to customers. An Aug. 9 order by the commission creates a working group of stakeholders to determine how best to implement what are known as multi-year rate plans. The method would set rates for a maximum of three years into the future. Maryland currently sets rates based on a historical test years, or costs incurred during a recent 12-month period, and allowing companies to get a certain rate of return. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Want to chime in on future redevelopment of Penn Station? Tomorrow’s your chance

With $90 million pledged from Amtrak and a master development agreement now in place, the overhaul of Baltimore’s centrally located transit hub is fast approaching. If you’re someone with strong feelings about how this could reshape Station North or the city as a whole, tomorrow is your time to chime in. Tuesday marks the second of three public meetings to establish a “shared vision among stakeholders and the community,” according to a press advisory. It’s happening at 6 p.m. at the H. Mebane Turner Learning Commons, located at 1415 Maryland Ave. on the University of Baltimore campus. (FishBowl)

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Maryland family asked to leave Outback Steakhouse because son with special needs was too loud

A Maryland woman was given restaurant credit after she and her family were asked to leave an Outback Steakhouse restaurant by a manager who said her son with special needs was the subject of a noise complaint. In a post on social media detailing the incident, Amanda Braun said she's not likely to use the credit.  Braun and her family were told they needed to "finish (their) meals and leave" about five minutes after their food arrived at the table, she said in a Facebook post. (USA Today)

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City Might Consider Bringing Back Privately-Funded Surveillance Plane To Assist Police

A privately-funded surveillance plane could be coming back to Baltimore to assist police. The owner of Persistent Surveillance Solutions told the C4 Show on WBAL that he is scheduled to meet with Police Commissioner Michael Harrison next week to discuss bringing back the privately funded program. "What we have been told is that if the police commissioner wants it he can have it. The program comes at no cost to the city," company CEO Ross McNutt said. McNutt said he has secured an anonymous donor to pay for three years of the program, as well as outside oversight. (WBAL-Radio)

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As Trump blasts Baltimore, residents of federally funded housing in city decry conditions

President Donald Trump launched a multiday Twitter tirade last month directed at U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, sharing video footage of derelict Baltimore neighborhoods and asking why the Democratic congressman wasn’t doing more to address the “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” in his district. Though Trump didn’t say so, some of the responsibility for any such conditions rests with his own administration. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has ultimate oversight of nearly 35,000 public housing and federally subsidized rental units in the city, many of which suffer from the squalor the president decried on social media. (Balt. Sun)

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