Wicomico 150th: At 150 years old, county faces age-old growth challenges

If the celebrations surrounding Wicomico County's sesquicentennial are also a time for reflection, there is a parade of civic challenges to ponder: shrinking paychecks, plummeting home values and the slowest rate of population growth since the Woodrow Wilson administration. Per-capita incomes are down about 2.5 percent since 2010 relative to the national economy. That has left Wicomico's citizenry with less money to spend on everything from milk to mortgages. (Daily Times)

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Salisbury officials look to curb chronic housing, crime issues

Officials are revisiting an ordinance that targets some of Salisbury's most problematic residences. They're looking to couple enforcement of repeated housing code violations with police calls for service in an effort to deter abuse of valuable city resources. Since 2014, the city has had a "Property Maintenance Chronic Nuisance Property" ordinance on the books that imposes penalties on property owners who repeatedly violate housing codes. (Daily Times)

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University of Maryland, Catholic Charities offer free dental service in College Park

For her 24th birthday, Jacqueline Alvarado got three teeth pulled and a root canal. Still, she was all smiles afterward. Her dentist had told her the dental work she needed would normally cost $5,000. The procedures on Sunday: free. Alvarado was among nearly 850 people who waited hours for free cleanings, X-rays, cavity fillings, extractions and other dental services during the 2017 Mid-Maryland Mission of Mercy & Health Equity Festival this weekend. (Balt. Sun)

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September 8 // Hogan dedicates Intercounty Connector to Ehrlich

Gov. Larry Hogan announced Thursday that he has dedicated the Intercounty Connector to his friend and onetime boss, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The two Republicans celebrated the dedication in Rockville beside the toll road, which Ehrlich fought to build during his term a decade ago. Hogan served in Ehrlich’s Cabinet. “For me, this is a real personal pleasure and an honor,” Hogan said. The road links Interstates 270 and 370 in Montgomery County to I-95 and U.S. 1 in Prince George's County. Plans were started for the connector as far back as 1955, Hogan said. (Balt. Sun)

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Maryland State Fair draws third-highest crowd on record

The Maryland State Fair saw its third best attendance on record this year, news that fair officials touted as the the result of a controversial decision to start public schools after Labor Day. More than 555,800 guests and exhibitors visited the fair, which was held Aug. 24 through Sept. 4 in Timonium. Attendance this year was 20 percent higher than in 2016 despite two rainy days, according to state fair Assistant General Manager Becky Brashear. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Harford County executive earns top honor for sheep at state fair

In what Harford County Executive Barry Glassman said may be his last year showing sheep at the Maryland State Fair, he earned top honors for his nine entries. Glassman, who has been showing sheep at the fair for almost 25 years, tweeted Monday about his win: “It took me 20 years, but my sheep finally won a Premier Exhibitor banner at state fair.” It’s taken a lot of hard work and a lot of time over a lot of years to tend to his herd of sheep, Glassman said Thursday. (Aegis)

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Report highlights farm manure pollution flowing into Bay from 4 Pa. counties

With Pennsylvania lagging badly in helping to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, a new report by an environmental group highlights the role that intensive livestock farming plays in the state’s shortcoming. Four south-central Pennsylvania counties where animal manure is heavily used to fertilize crops “contribute disproportionately” to the nitrogen and phosphorus pollution fouling local waterways and the Chesapeake Bay, according to the report by the Environmental Integrity Project. (Bay Journal-Md. Reporter)

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As City Paper comes to an end, editors imagine a new future for advocacy journalism

This year marks the end of two long-time city media outlets — the Baltimore City Paper and WEAA's "The Marc Steiner Show," both of which announced closures earlier this year after 40 and 24 years, respectively. For City Paper editor-in-chief Brandon Soderberg, the loss of both the alternative weekly and the progressive public affairs talk show is, "a major blow to the city at a moment when we need journalism that is really going to push people." (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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