Carroll County Public Library eliminates overdue fines

As of the beginning of September, Carroll County Public Library (CCPL) is no longer charging overdue fines. In addition, CCPL will waive all existing overdue fines from customer accounts. The new policy ensures that all members of our community have equitable access to CCPL’s resources and services, while eliminating the financial barrier of overdue fines, according to a news release from communications director Lisa Picker. Customers who previously had outstanding account balances will be able to resume borrowing physical and digital materials and access online library resources. (Carr Co Times)

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Hospitalizations Slightly Down, ICU Cases Flat As More Than 450 New Cases Reported

More than 450 new coronavirus cases were reported in Maryland as of Wednesday morning, as the number of hospitalizations slightly decreased. A total of 109,319 COVID-19 cases were reported in Maryland over the span of the pandemic, that’s 456 more than Tuesday. Hospitalizations went down from 377 to 370, while ICU cases remain flat going up by once case since Tuesday to 113. (WJZ)

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Task Force Begins Reviewing Montgomery County Police Department’s Funding, Accessing Racism

A task force has begun its work reviewing operations in a Maryland police department, including examining the agency’s funding and assessing racism in law enforcement. The 80-member task force began evaluating the Montgomery County Police Department this week, according to the county. The group will make recommendations on policy reforms and changes to the department by the beginning of next year. (AP/WJZ)

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Howard, Harford Counties Move Forward With Gov. Hogan's Latest Reopening Directive

At least two Maryland counties are going along with Gov. Larry Hogan's latest executive order and moving into phase three of reopening. In Baltimore, Howard and Harford counties, all businesses will be able to reopen effective 5 p.m. Friday. Theaters will be able to reopen and restrictions on stores and houses of worship will loosen. (WBAL)

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‘It’s not party time yet’: Montgomery County to delay move to Phase 3

Officials in Montgomery County, Maryland, say they are not ready to lift coronavirus restrictions as part of the state’s Phase Three reopening plan. Instead, the county plans to continue lifting virus-related rules on a case-by-case basis. “I won’t say we’re going to move into Phase Three,” County Executive Marc Elrich said during a briefing Wednesday. “We will continue to likely modify our Phase Two, which we’ve been doing all along.” (WTOP)

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Baltimore expected to give destroyed Columbus statue back to Italian American organization that donated it

After protesters toppled a towering statue of Christopher Columbus and dumped it into Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, a group of Italian Americans organized to fish the marble chunks out of the water. They moved what was left of the statue to a private warehouse for “safekeeping,” far from the piazza where it stood for more than three decades. The group is working now to restore it to its original form. Even so, city officials are not expected to take it back. (Balt Sun)

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Residents Upset By Proposed MTA Cuts Prompted By Coronavirus-Related Budget Shortfall

Baltimoreans who rely on public transportation to get around decried proposed cuts to bus and MARC service as community leaders said budget shortfalls due to the coronavirus shouldn’t be balanced “on the backs of the most vulnerable.” On Tuesday, the Maryland Department of Transportation Maryland Transit Administration announced a number of cuts, citing revenue and ridership drops amid the pandemic. (Balt Sun)

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Housing advocates see spike in clients as eviction hearings resume in Anne Arundel County

Jo Anne Mattson, executive director of Light House homeless shelter in Annapolis, said members of her staff are breaking down in tears on the job, overwhelmed by the sheer number of desperate people forced out of their jobs — and now their homes — because of the coronavirus pandemic. Mattson and Light House staff anticipated a rise in homelessness as the coronavirus pandemic shuttered businesses, caused employers to slash hours and pushed residents to the brink of eviction. Despite bracing for a crisis, the fallout for so many families has been hard on the heart. (Cap. Gazette)

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