Rock Steady fights back against Parkinson's disease

Larry Zarzecki, a former Maryland State trooper, paced the room at Carroll Hospital, speaking loudly, almost barking, at the dozen or so Parkinson's patients who had gathered for a unique demonstration. "How many don't think they can box? You don't think you can box?" Zarzecki asked during the Thursday demonstration. Just one hand went up, that of a man sitting quietly in his wheelchair. Zarzecki didn't hesitate. "I need a pair of gloves." Zarzecki is a member of Rock Steady Baltimore, a Timonium nonprofit that utilizes noncontact boxing exercises in an effort to reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's, such as tremor, and improve balance and other functions. (Carr. Co. Times)

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March 27 // As Metro mulls financial woes, Maryland residents lean toward regionwide sales tax

Marylanders narrowly support a regionwide sales tax to boost Metro funding, giving it the most support among several proposals to bolster the struggling transit agency, a new Washington Post-University of Maryland poll finds. The survey of Maryland residents offers a picture of local taxpayers' preferences as leaders from the District, Maryland and Virginia ramp up their efforts to find consensus on a dedicated funding source for Metro — a move officials say is necessary to keep the transit agency financially solvent in coming years. (Wash. Post)

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Some Frederick aldermen interested in talking about a citywide immigration policy

Some elected Frederick officials are considering creating a citywide policy to help determine where the city stands on immigration enforcement. The discussion is related to a nationwide focus on “sanctuary cities,” a reference to government bodies declining to enforce immigration laws. Alderman Josh Bokee provided the mayor and board of aldermen with information about different approaches to establishing a citywide policy that he hopes officials can discuss at a future public workshop. (News-Post)

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Annapolis City Council to vote on reforestation legislation

The Annapolis City Council meets on Monday to hold a vote on legislation that would require developers to replant each acre of trees they cut down. The proposed bill, spearheaded by Alderman Jared Littmann, D-Ward 5, and Ross Arnett, D-Ward 8, is an effort by lawmakers to maintain the city's tree canopy. Current law requires developers to replace at minimum a quarter of each acre they cut down. (Capital)

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Too much transparency? Montgomery balks at publishing residents’ email addresses.

It was a signature achievement for Montgomery County Council member Hans Riemer: passage of the 2012 Open Government bill, which requires all county departments to make public records more available and accessible through a central Web portal. “You have a right to know what your government is doing. And I have made protecting that right a central part of my work,” Riemer (D-At Large) said in his campaign literature as he ran for reelection in Maryland’s largest jurisdiction in 2014. Last week, however, after more than 200,000 email addresses of people receiving newsletters and other information from the county government were made public on the county’s website, Riemer and some of his colleagues decided they had opened the portals of government a bit too wide. (Wash. Post)

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OC offshore wind cause blustery debate at hearing

The first public hearing on the proposed wind farms off the coast of Ocean City and Delaware brought both praise and criticism from residents and business leaders. The two companies, Deepwater Wind, responsible for the first American offshore wind project at Block Island, Rhode Island, and Baltimore's US Wind, are both in the running to build farms approximately 17 miles off the coastline. US Wind's 248 megawatt proposal off the coast of Ocean City, with a potential growth to 750 megawatts, would be the second, and largest, offshore wind farm in America. (Daily Times)

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As crab season beckons, some watermen hope for new rules to bolster their harvest

A decade ago, the bay's blue crab population was on the brink of collapsing when Maryland and Virginia agreed to dramatically reduce the harvest of young and female crabs. Biologists credit the rules with helping the crab population rebound and stabilize, and mild weather this winter portends a third-straight year of gains in crab numbers. But the rules could become a victim of their own success. Officials in Gov. Larry Hogan's administration said this month they are willing to consider changes to the harvest limits if crab population growth remains strong, just as they are exploring opening some prosperous oyster sanctuaries to harvest. (Balt. Sun)

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Protesters question school safety, immigration policy after reported rape

About 100 demonstrators rallied Sunday in front of Montgomery County government headquarters, urging county leaders to do more to prevent crimes in public schools after a 14-year-old girl was reportedly raped inside the bathroom at Rockville High School this month. Many of the demonstrators were angry that the two suspects in that crime — Henry E. Sanchez Milian, 18, and Jose O. Montano, 17 — were undocumented immigrants who enrolled in the school after arriving in the United States illegally from Central America. (Wash. Post)

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