Smoking may soon be off the menu when dining outside in Rockville

In an increasingly smoke-free world, the outdoor restaurant table has become a kind of last redoubt for lighting up in public. But on Monday, the Rockville City Council is expected to eliminate that refuge by passing a ban on smoking or vaping in outdoor dining areas and bar patios. The suburban Maryland city of 66,000 would become the largest Washington-area locality to snuff out the practice and would join a lengthening list of jurisdictions nationwide. (Wash. Post)

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Annapolis City Council considering major parking changes

Get ready for parking changes downtown. Alderman Joe Budge and Mayor Mike Pantelides have introduced legislation that would change how parking will be handled. There will also be administrative changes that won't require legislation. Changes include making loading zones available for taxis and other vehicles during times of the day, allowing commercial vehicles to double park for faster unloading, removing the circulator fee and encouraging local employees to park farther away from downtown and to use transportation. (Capital)

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Less than a month away, $135 million BaltimoreLink bus overhaul rolling forward

Four Mondays from now, Darlene Brown and Indira McDonald don't know how they'll get to work. The No. 60 bus route, which runs up and down Falls Road between Baltimore and their jobs at the Johns Hopkins Health Care & Surgery Center at Green Spring Station in Lutherville, will be cut short by five miles under the Maryland Transit Administration's BaltimoreLink route overhaul. The bus route and their stop is one of hundreds the MTA is modifying or eliminating due to low ridership as part of an update to the system designed to make it faster and more reliable. (Balt. Sun)

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College Park’s bikeshare network expands

The small bike share system that launched a year ago in College Park is expanding outside the city boundaries this week. The mBike system is adding five stations, including two in the nearby University Park. Other municipalities along the Route 1 corridor are considering joining the system, which has provided thousands of trips to residents and visitors in that area of Prince George’s County. (Wash. Post)

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Access to dental care still limited for many a decade after Deamonte Driver’s death

In 2007, 12-year-old Diamonte Driver died of a toothache. A routine $80 tooth extraction would have saved the Prince George's County boy. The bacteria from the abscess had spread to Deamonte's brain by the time his tooth got any attention. After two operations, he died. The tragedy spawned reforms that brought some in Maryland better access to dental care, but a harsh reality remains that if Diamonte were alive with the same abscessed tooth today, he'd probably still die. (Brew)

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Cloud Computing pulls off upset in 142nd Preakness

 

Seth Klarman’s romance with thoroughbred racing blossomed in the heart of Baltimore, where he grew up three blocks from Pimlico Race Course and made annual pilgrimages to watch the Preakness. Klarman saw the mighty Secretariat win it in 1973, two years before he graduated from Poly and moved away from home. But even on his most blissful day at the neighborhood track, he never fathomed he’d own race horses, much less one gifted enough to win a leg of the Triple Crown. (Balt. Sun)

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‘Swimmable’ goal still eludes Baltimore harbor — but not all the time

It was safe to jump into waters off of Fort McHenry almost 90 percent of the time in 2016, but the Baltimore harbor is still far from meeting a goal of becoming "swimmable and fishable" by 2020, according to a report being released Monday. The Healthy Harbor Initiative report again gives the Patapsco River, Jones Falls and Gwynns Falls failing grades. The waterways contain high levels of nitrogen and algae and have poor water clarity, signs of a poor ecosystem for fish, grasses and crabs. And fecal bacteria from an aged, leaky sewer system is still a frequent contaminant. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore Journalist, White House correspondent April Ryan honored

The National Association of Black Journalists named Baltimore’s April Ryan as the 2017 journalist of the year. A celebration was held Saturday at Maryland Public Television. The veteran White House correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks and a CNN political analyst will be honored in August at the NABJ convention in New Orleans. (WJZ-TV)

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