Why the CDC’s eviction moratorium isn’t enough to prevent evictions in Maryland

COVID-19 has lit a torch on the systemic social and economic inequities faced by communities of color with respect to health care, livable wages and affordable, safe housing. Congress has failed to prioritize housing stability and pass adequate relief measures for tenants facing evictions while eviction protections in Maryland and around the country have expired. Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a “Temporary Halt in Residential Evictions to Prevent the Further Spread of COVID-19” Order. The CDC order is intended to provide broad relief from evictions until December 31. (Balt Sun)

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Two years after Jordan McNair’s death, Maryland is back to putting football above student health

The death of Jordan McNair, the 19-year-old University of Maryland offensive lineman who died of heatstroke two years ago, hit College Park hard, and rightly so. It wasn’t just that the onetime McDonogh School football star died as a result of outdoor spring practices in the heat and humidity but that the event was so preventable. As medical experts noted at the time, exertional heat stroke has a 100% survival rate if the problem had simply been diagnosed and treated with something as simple as an ice bath. (Balt Sun)

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Our Say: Annapolis council ducks action on affordable housing, once again

Once again, the Annapolis City Council has pulled back from actions that would make the city a more affordable place to live. Alderman Rob Savidge this week withdrew affordable housing legislation that would have allowed the creation of accessory dwelling units in almost every part of the city where single-family detached homes can be built. It didn’t have enough votes to pass. (Cap Gazette)

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The digital divide

Internet connectivity and the digital divide have been long-term challenges across the Eastern Shore as well as other rural and small town communities across the country. The problem has jumped to the forefront again with the start of the new school year and school districts having students take classes from home because of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Star Dem)

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Maryland technology group TEDCO stresses accountability under new leadership

During the last year, the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) has made significant changes to enhance our leadership, update our programs and reinforce our core values to better serve universities, entrepreneurs and the technology sector in our state. We place great pride in our values as they guide our efforts and interactions with people inside and outside of our organization. They are critical to our mission and for serving our stakeholders. (Balt Sun)

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Stevenson: Policing and protesting

When declarations of concern like protests are muffled, violence is probable and community is lessened.

It has been almost four years to the date since a peaceful protest occurred in front of the Hagerstown Police Department on Burhans Boulevard. By accident, on that day I came upon the crowd of approximately 75 people who had assembled to voice their concern about an incident. Later, I returned to the protest area and learned more about the cause and declared a rightful privilege every citizen has, i.e., to be a responsible advocate (protester) for justice and fair play.right to be present to the concern at hand. (Herald Mail)

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Former Ravens player: To make schools safe, support kids, don’t criminalize them

Despite my 10 years in the NFL, the biggest hit I ever took was off the field, when I was 14 years old. My brother and I were driving to pick up our younger siblings when another vehicle hit us head on. I flew face first into the windshield, while our car’s motor crashed through the back window, leaving me with a broken foot and gashes that required over 400 stitches. Although I recovered, the episode scarred me, not just physically but emotionally. (Balt Sun)

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When white privilege collides with squeegee kids

For anyone living in Baltimore, Sunday’s tweet by a white Texas cardiologist claiming his daughter and her boyfriend had been “attacked by a group of BLM” in the city — meaning Black Lives Matter advocates — and that police “cannot do anything” about it because the alleged assailants “are African American” immediately raised suspicions. But that didn’t prevent the usual social media suspects from blindly believing every word. The tweet garnered 50,000 likes and retweets from around the Twitterverse. And we can almost guarantee you that thousands more read it and didn’t respond, but still tucked it away in the back of their minds for long-term storage... (Balt Sun)

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