Tricia Bishop - Dear Baltimore judge: 'Manning up' is not admitting guilt, it's avoiding the crime

On Sept. 7th, Dakei Perry, then 18, ordered from a Baltimore pizza place so he and his two accomplices could attack the delivery driver. They choked her, pawed through her pockets, stole her cash and cell phone — and then ate the food. Five days later, young Mr. Perry joined in the group assault of a 64-year-old Towson University professor who was reading a book in the Wyman Park Dell. One of the assailants livestreamed the attack on Facebook. They held a gun to the professor’s head, Maced him, stabbed him and robbed him, taking his backpack and $60. On Wednesday, Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Jennifer B. Schiffer told Mr. Perry, now 19, that he seems “like a guy with potential.” (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore schools should look for students in an unlikely place: the suburbs

Enrollment is the key to many of Baltimore City schools’ problems. Declines in the last few years have put pressure on the budget; each lost student means more than $11,000 in reduced aid from the state. That forces budget cuts — often to the very programs and services that make the schools attractive to parents in the first place, which in turn exacerbates enrollment declines and worsens the budget problems. Growing enrollment, on the other hand, could have the opposite effect, making underpopulated schools more efficient and enabling them to provide better opportunities for students. (Balt. Sun)

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Dan Rodricks: For those at risk in Baltimore, there are choices besides prison and death

Dear Fellow Baltimoreans: If you know someone who is caught up in something that might get them shot or killed -- someone recently home from prison and having a hard time finding his way past his old life and old friends -- you can send him my way. I’ll talk to him. I’ll make some suggestions. There are a lot of people willing to help. We have been down this path before, many times. (Balt. Sun)

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Eva Wingren: If we want the arts in Baltimore, we need artists

I’m in the process of buying a house in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District of Baltimore. Here’s what the listing has to say about my house: “This modern rehab is close to everything Station North Arts and Entertainment District has to offer. Walk to restaurants, Charles Theater, various entertainment venues, coffee shops — it is all here.” Baltimore’s arts scene was a major reason I moved to Baltimore, and a major reason for choosing the Station North neighborhood. But while my listing talked up the arts, it said nothing about the artists. (Balt. Sun)

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Kim Coble: Why cut the $73M Bay program that provides billions in benefits?

There was more good news for the Bay this spring. There is clear consensus in the scientific community that the health of the Bay is improving. In the last five months, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s State of the Bay report, the Chesapeake Bay Program’s Bay Barometer, and the University of Maryland’s Center for Environmental Science’s Bay Report Card all show progress. All three reports, though, show that much more needs to be done. (Md. Reporter)

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Michael Collins: Is a Crofton sweep coming for District 33?

The latest campaign for delegate in District 33 is moving forward faster than previous ones and may tip the balance of representation in the district. Ten years ago District 33 was represented state Sen. Janet Greenip of Crofton, and Dels. Bob Costa of Deale, James King of Gambrills and Tony McConkey of Severna Park. After 2018, the entire District 33 delegation may hail from Crofton. (Capital)

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June 22 // Prince George’s residents deserve an answer to charges of systemic corruption

Charges that systemic corruption in the Prince George’s County school system led to the fraudulent boosting of graduation rates should be examined by Maryland state education officials. The county’s residents need to know if school administrators engaged in unethical practices to burnish the system’s credentials, or if the school board’s small group of disaffected members is so reckless as to advance its interests by belittling the efforts of teachers and students. Whatever the answer, it is clear the struggling school system has issues it must confront. (Wash. Post)

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Budget season blurs into campaign season

The $106 million budget approved Monday by the Annapolis City Council is the fourth originating from Mayor Mike Pantelides, a Republican whose platform called for righting the city's fiscal policies. It is, by and large, a status quo document, and the final version that passed remains largely the mayor's plan. Council members nibbled at it here and there, cutting a proposed property tax cut too small to counteract rising property assessments and reducing long-term borrowing. A plan to set up a council attorney and auditor as a check on the mayor's limited authority was killed. (Capital)

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