Bowie knows how to keep a business

While Prince George’s County and some municipalities are funneling millions of dollars into attracting and retaining businesses, Bowie officials are wisely taking a more direct route. Last year, the city’s largest employer, health care company Inovalon, cited concerns about limited public transit that hinders its 700 employees from traveling between two buildings the company leases in the city, and from traveling to restaurants and stores. So, beginning in September, Bowie will offer Inovalon employees a free shuttle bus service, with stops at Bowie Town Center, the Northview Drive Park and Ride and the company’s two buildings. (Capital)

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Nancy Fenton: We know how to reduce recidivism

Any reduction in recidivism rates is good news. People are less likely to return to prison if they have jobs, a safe place to live, and the will to succeed. Children are reunited with parents, and communities become stronger when there is less criminal activity. Achieving this kind of success is not easy. It requires a serious commitment from the person who was formerly incarcerated as well as state and local entities, plus the knowledge base of the nonprofit and for-profit sectors. (Balt. Sun)

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The buck stops here

Now that the controversy over the proposed third Wal-Mart in Frederick has quieted down, it’s time to take a long, hard look at whose campaign pockets have been lined in this debacle. This week the candidates’ Contributions and Expenditures Report for the city elections were released on the city of Frederick’s website. (News-Post)

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Claire Louder: Time for a Crofton High School

It’s time for Back to School, and another class of Crofton students, educated together through middle school, will be split off to separate high schools. This situation was supposed to be remedied by now. In 1998, when Crofton was originally split between South River and Arundel high schools, it was meant as a temporary measure. Over the years, however, the temporary became permanent. (Capital)

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"Ganslergate" and the Manufacturing of News

As everyone who pays attention to Maryland politics knows, the Free State is in the midst of a scandal! Ganslergate, as one reporter laughingly described it to me. I must admit, when I first read the story and the quotes I didn't get what the controversy was. Doug Gansler noted something that everyone knows - race still matters in American politics. It especially matters in Maryland where African Americans account for 30-35% of the Democratic primary electorate and about a quarter of the general election voters. (Free Stater)

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Witcover on Germond: He was committed to the end to what always was a labor of love

American journalism has lost a giant in the passing at 85 of Jack Germond, my longtime pal and partner in the joyful chronicling of the antics and outrages of political reformers and rogues alike over the last half-century. Long before we teamed up to write a newspaper column at the old Washington Star and then at The Baltimore Sun, and eventually to write four books on presidential campaigns, Jack was in the vanguard of holding politicians' feet to the fire. (Balt. Sun)

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Rodricks: Frederick Co. gets a reputation for mean

A smart, progressive event gets under way in Frederick County in about a week — a farm-to-fork promotion in 13 restaurants there. Starting Aug. 23, the participating establishments will offer home-grown food and wine; they'll buy enough products from county farmers and vintners to make their menus 60 percent local. (Balt. Sun)

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Deborah Agus: Bringing addicts in from the streets

It is mid-morning on a recent Friday in West Baltimore, and there is a long line snaking down the street and around the corner. Why? Vendors are dispensing free heroin samples. In other areas of the city, buyers are risking arrest and drug contamination to illegally purchase buprenorphine. It is legal medication when given with a prescription. It is used to treat opioid addiction and facilitate recovery. So why buy it illegally? Not to get high as a substitute for heroin. They are using it to treat their heroin addiction. (Balt. Sun)

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