Will Royal Farms start another local food fight?

Sean O’Neill, the president of the Annapolis Business Association, summed up the problem: A fair number of downtown residents — some of them still mourning the demise of Rookie’s Market 19 years ago — would love a vest-pocket grocery store downtown. They might be hospitable to Royal Farms’ plan to move into the former Stevens Hardware building on City Dock if that, indeed, is what the Baltimore-based convenience store company plans to offer. (Capital)

Read Full Article

Tom Horton: Immigration is an environmental issue

What if they held an environmental crisis and no one cared? What if a law moving through Congress would significantly harm clean water, open space, the Chesapeake Bay? You'd hear the alarms, strong and clear, from the largest national groups to the smallest Chesapeake organizations. But you won't in this case, because this law is "only" about population — about significantly increasing the number of people who will be living in the United States and around the Chesapeake. The law is a comprehensive reform of our outdated immigration laws. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Sept. 3 // Baltimore's sprawling enterprise zone

Has the modern, expanded interpretation of enterprise zones been at the expense of neighborhood development? Many have grappled with that issue over the years but, ultimately, there is precious little evidence that encouraging waterfront development has somehow shortchanged other parts of the city. Still, the recent debate over taxpayer assistance for Harbor Point has renewed a healthy debate over how far Baltimore should go to support development in the more upscale neighborhoods. We believe the City Council has chosen correctly to move forward with the $107 in tax increment financing bonds to cover roads, parks and other infrastructure. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Going for the gold

Perhaps you hadn't noticed, but Baltimore and Maryland are again in the running to be part of the world's most celebrated of sports events. Last week, a nonprofit group in Washington announced that the District and Baltimore plan to throw their hats into the ring as contenders to jointly host the 2024 Summer Olympic games. This could be a great opportunity to showcase the city and its region. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Barry Rascovar: Chicken manure lawsuit a teachable moment for UMd law school

The sad saga of the Hudson Family farm continues. You remember the Hudsons, who raise Cornish hens for Perdue and also a herd of beef cattle on 300 acres near Berlin on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore. Alan and Kristin Hudson got sued by the New York-based Waterkeeper Alliance, which hoped to win a landmark case holding Perdue liable for water pollution in drainage ditches caused by chicken manure from a subcontractor like the Hudsons. The plaintiffs, represented in part by the University of Maryland’s Environmental Law Clinic, embarrassed themselves. It was such a botched job that it makes an ideal case study (perhaps at the rival University of Baltimore Law School). (Md. Reporter)

Read Full Article

Livable wage is essential

It should not be too much to ask businesses to provide their employees with a livable wage or, failing that, we should take steps to raise the minimum wage allowed by law. Higher earnings for employees puts more money in their pocket, which they in turn will use to buy goods or services, spurring the economy. It lifts more people out of poverty and allows them to get off government assistance programs, something which ultimately would reduce overall government spending. (Carroll Co. Times)

Read Full Article

Dan Rodricks: 'We want your guns, not your drugs'

Two weeks after a federal judge declared New York City's stop-and-frisk policing unconstitutional is an odd time to ask the question, but here goes: Would New York-style stop-and-frisk policing reduce Baltimore homicides to such a low level that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of growing the city by 10,000 families would start to look plausible, even overly modest? (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Richard Cross: GOP in 2014?

Simply put, the GOP's eventual gubernatorial nominee could conceivably run a perfect campaign yet lose anyway simply because the resources and the numbers simply aren't there. Given these realities, I find it difficult to see any credible path for a GOP gubernatorial win in 2014. That said, here's hoping someone proves this jaded observer wrong. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article