Art Callaham: Government should be lead stadium investor

The overall communitywide positive economic development impact makes the stadium project a “no brainer.” If you liken the stadium project to a public road project, you will see that the overall community value from a public road comes from what travels over and is along the road. For a stadium, the community value is what happens inside and outside the facility. With that thought in mind, why should the government be the primary investor in a stadium, just like government usually is in a public road? (Herald-Mail)

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July 23 // Spying on motorists

Perhaps it should have come as no surprise that police in Maryland are now tracking the comings-and-goings of millions of motorists traveling on state roads using a network of cameras that automatically read and record the license plate numbers on their cars. But the program does more than look for those suspected of wrongdoing. Like the NSA's PRISM program, which collects and saves virtually all email and Internet traffic between the U.S. and foreign countries in order to identify the tiny fraction of suspicious communications, Maryland's plate surveillance effort scoops up millions of numbers that have no association with criminal activity. (Balt. Sun)

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Politically Correct?: Redistricting is politically tense process

Why are we writing about redistricting? A major prerequisite for this every 10-year process, the 2010 U.S. Census, was completed a couple of years ago. Surely, the process of redrawing district boundary lines to adjust for population shifts is finished? Voters should choose their representatives, not the other way around. (Daily Times)

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The return of the Four Seasons

We believe that Gov. Martin O'Malley, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy Kopp should not grant the tidal wetlands permit the New Jersey-based developer is seeking to build the Four Seasons, which at 1,079 units would be the largest housing development effort constructed in the 1,000-foot critical areas buffer. That's because, as the project's opponents have already noted, the amended development plans have not been sufficiently reviewed by the Maryland Department of the Environment. (Balt. Sun)

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How Sun spun new Maryland health care story

We were struck by the very different – almost 180°opposite – headlines and spins today in the Baltimore Sun and the Washington Post, both reporting on the new health plans in Maryland, finalized this week. “Maryland issues insurance rates that are among lowest in U.S.” (The Washington Post) “Premiums to go up as much as 25 percent under health reform” (The Baltimore Sun) (Brew)

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Jake Day: To build or rebuild, that is the question

Living on Delmarva, it is impossible to miss the evidence for climate change resulting in rising sea levels. While it’s not reasonable to take private property or to legislate exactly how people should manage theirs, neither is it reasonable to pretend we can keep going as we always have. We must re-evaluate when and where we will be able to build, rebuild and provide compensation for lost property because there simply won’t be enough money to go around when catastrophic flooding becomes the norm. Serious planning is needed. (Daily Times)

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Andy Harris: Baltimore should attack violence, not pregnancy centers

In the last paragraph of his reply ("Pregnancy center signs are necessary," July 24) to Marta H. Mossburg's opinion article about the ridiculousness of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's legal crusade against crisis pregnancy centers, Baltimore City Solicitor George Nilson reveals what his agenda and that of Mayor Rawlings-Blake really is — "to eliminate this threat to public health." (Balt. Sun)

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Ben Cardin: Pain of sequestration is real

Recently, some in the media have promoted the idea that the $85 billion sequestration cuts triggered on March 1 aren't causing drastic effects. CNN called the cuts "not as bad as advertised," and a Washington Post report found the cuts less "scary" than predicted. Tell that to the 46,000 Department of Defense employees in Maryland and another 103,000 in the Capitol Region who are being furloughed, resulting in up to a 20 percent reduction in weekly pay through the rest of the fiscal year. Or maybe those who should be receiving the 700 grants not being offered by the National Institutes of Health because of its $1.5 billion cut.  (Balt. Sun)

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