Gov. Hogan wants Tubman on the $20. He can do something much more persuasive than writing a letter.

We’re glad that Gov. Larry Hogan has joined the effort to get the Trump administration to reverse its outrageous decision to delay replacing Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill with Maryland-born abolitionist and all-around historical inspiration Harriet Tubman. He’s right that Tubman’s “unbelievable acts of heroism, courage, and sacrifice have more than earned her rightful place among our nation’s most pivotal leaders,” and one would hope that his addition of a Republican voice to the advocacy from Rep. Elijah Cummings and others might make Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin come to his senses. (Balt. Sun)

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Viewpoint: Why we need PropTech — now more than ever

The recent ransomware attack on Baltimore City’s government computer system — and the resulting paralysis of the local real estate marketplace — has shined a bright spotlight on the rising interdependence of the real estate and technology industries. Real estate stakeholders in particular have noted the apparent ease with which the attack crippled the sector’s ability to achieve even a basic level of functionality — obtaining title insurance, receiving utility and lien information, and recording deeds and mortgages — in a largely digitized era. Many are asking, “Are we becoming over-reliant on technology?” (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Hogan and the legislature are on a school funding collision course. Here are five things to keep in mind as the Kirwan debate unfolds

The next few months are make-or-break time for the ambitious education reform proposals championed by Maryland’s Kirwan Commission. Last week, the House speaker and Senate president named a study group to figure out how to divide the costs between the state and counties. They’ll do it under a shadow of uncertainty cast by Gov. Larry Hogan’s skepticism about the whole enterprise. In allowing legislation funding the first two years of Kirwan implementation to go into law without his signature, Mr. Hogan railed against the costs of the full proposal, predicting ruinous tax increases if it is ever fully phased in. (Balt. Sun)

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Witcover: Time for Congress to play its hand on impeachment

After weeks of dancing around its constitutional authorization to impeach a president suspected of warranting it, the House of Representatives appears on the verge of initiating the formal process. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York has rebuked the Justice Department's call for negotiations, suggesting he's ready to issue his threatened subpoena to retired Special Counsel Robert Mueller to testify. Mr. Mueller has insisted that even if he honors the subpoena by showing up, he has no intention of going beyond his written report. (Balt. Sun)

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More students are graduating from high school. Let’s make sure their diplomas mean something.

Graduation season is upon us, and millions of students across the United States will receive their high school diplomas this month. But though high school graduation rates have increased from 71.7 percent in 2001 to 84.6 percent in 2017, that improvement doesn’t mean all students have benefitted equally. Graduation rates also are not the only measure of whether more students are actually ready for college and the increasing demands of work. (Wash. Post)

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Viewpoint: Ashkenazy held Harborplace, city hostage for years

Thank you, Lawrence D. Coppel. The Gordon Feinblatt attorney offered what has become a rare thing among business or political leaders in this city. He spoke very candidly about the tragedy that is Harborplace being put into receivership because its owner defaulted on its loan. There was no sugarcoated, carefully worded written statement. Just his honest-to-God opinion. "As a city person, it's not a happy occasion to see a project like that go into receivership," he told BBJ Reporter Melody Simmons. "William Donald Schaeferwould be rolling in his grave right now. It's a shame." (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Frank DeFilippo: Public-Private Partnerships — Like Something Out of Ayn Rand

More than a decade ago, the state of Indiana sold a 157-mile toll road to a private venture for a lump sum payment of $3.8 billion. The road lost $260 million a year later, the private consortium was unable to make the debt payments and the state almost got stuck with paying off the bonds. A second private consortium bailed out the deal for $5.7 billion with 66 years left on the lease. Tolls skyrocketed. Illinois turned its lottery over to private managers but canceled the arrangement after three years when revenues fell $500 million behind projections. (Md. Matters)

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Pitts: What would you give to save your world?

Elmo Cook knew nothing about it. He'd heard the sirens in the middle of the night alerting all of Abilene that something had happened, but when he tried to turn on the radio, he found that his power was out. And when he left for work in the morning, the paperboy had not yet made his rounds. As a result, Mr. Cook was one of the last people in town to hear about D-Day. (Balt. Sun)

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