Though reasonable, pacts between feds, Anne Arundel County raise hackles

In saner and less polarized times, neither of Anne Arundel County's two ongoing agreements with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement would have created much stir. But while there aren't big inherent problems with either arrangement, provided they are carried out as described by County Executive Steve Schuh and corrections chief Terry Kokolis, the county needs to tread carefully these days. (Capital)

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Mike Benusic: Bottle litter is an eyesore — and a hazard

As a recent transplant from Canada, there were many differences I expected living in Baltimore: humid summers, less colorful money, more colorful politics. Pleasantly unexpected was the amount of green space and the rudimentary cycling network that serves me well traveling between Hopkins campuses. However, both are tarnished by an unfamiliar foe: discarded bottles and cans. (Balt. Sun)

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October 12 // Sports betting? No reason to rush

In less than two months, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear a New Jersey case that could repeal federal limits on sports betting. Not surprisingly, Maryland casino owners are interested in a piece of that action. They are already urging the Maryland General Assembly to place on the 2018 ballot a constitutional amendment to legalize wagers on professional and college sports events. Under the circumstances, there is really only one appropriate course of action when the legislature reconvenes in January. Just say no. (Balt. Sun)

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What to expect from the Gray officer trial boards

It’s not surprising that Baltimore Police Officers Edward Nero and Garrett Miller chose to accept punishment rather than go before a public trial board for their roles in the arrest of Freddie Gray. Although they maintain they did nothing wrong, they are now able to get on with their lives. From the public’s perspective, though, it’s somewhat disappointing. The investigation into their role in that day’s events compiled by the Howard and Montgomery county police departments will now be shrouded under the state’s protections for personnel records. We don’t know what punishment they received, though both reportedly faced the possibility of a five-day unpaid suspension. (Balt. Sun)

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Nick Berry: Civility prevails after latest city primary

Primary contests can be brutal. They can bruise the winners and losers, especially if the party’s losers don’t support the winner. This happened in the last mayoral primary when incumbent Josh Cohen did not get the support of his defeated opponent, Bevin Buchheister, although she had previously pledged to support the winner. Mike Pantelides got a gift, undoubtedly putting him over the top. Standard party protocol directs that primary losers support winners. All primary candidates expect party unity to prevail. Had Buchheister won the primary she would have naturally expected Cohen’s endorsement, which he would have given. As an electoral newcomer, Buchheister violated this protocol. (Capital)

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A sensible school calendar for Howard County

Howard County is not alone in struggling to align its school calendar for the next year with the governor’s mandate to start classes after Labor Day and end the year before mid-June, an exercise aptly described as “always a puzzle.” But unlike other large districts in the state, the county’s proposals for 2018-2019 are largely sensible and don’t take away religious holidays that have been promised, an issue that is becoming a flash point in neighboring Baltimore and Montgomery counties. Two major Jewish holidays are retained and schools also would be closed for the Lunar New Year and the Hindu Diwali festival of lights, observances that were recent additions to the calendar in response to community requests to reflect and respect the county’s diversity. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Jan Wilson: Until there is a cure for breast cancer...

A pink spotlight is shown on breast cancer awareness every October, but for patients diagnosed with the disease, battling breast cancer is their focus 365 days of the year. Roughly 4,600 women in Maryland will be diagnosed with breast cancer annually, joining the 50,000 women already living with the disease in our state. Until there is a cure, these women will wage a fight for their lives while battling on a second front as they deal with multiple threats to their finances. Necessities such as childcare, household upkeep, food and transportation become crippling when combined with treatment time and costs. The out-of-pocket cost of living with breast cancer can add $2,230 to a family’s budget monthly. (Balt. Sun)

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Tom Horton: At Turners Landing, Chesapeake Bay's story is writ large

It’s just a crease in the landscape, a gully incised by a hundred thousand years of rains, knifing toward sea level through bluffs bulged up by glacial ice, and augmented by sand and gravel spewed down ancient channels of the Delaware and Susquehanna rivers. Where it cut down to access the edge of the Chesapeake’s bays (plural, because there have been more than one, as glaciers came and went and seas rose and fell), wildlife came to drink and fish. Such “landings,” as they became known during European settlement, characterized the Sassafras. I’ve camped there for several springs now with my Salisbury University classes, and the comings and goings across the little landing offer endless interest, windows into the ever-changing natures of the Upper Chesapeake. (Daily Times-Bay Journal)

 

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