Editorial: Frederick flooding: History repeated itself, but city was ready for it

In the early 1970s, engineers began warning city of Frederick officials that — unless a way was found to control Carroll Creek — the central city would be flooded every five years. Extensive growth on the west side of the city, especially along the Golden Mile, resulted in formerly open acres being paved over and becoming impervious to rainwater. Each year, the creek was carrying more runoff through town and out to the Monocacy River east of the central city. After two major floods, first during Hurricane Agnes in 1972 and then the disastrous 1976 flood, city and state officials began looking for solutions. (News-Post)

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Sessoms: Lack of diversity in cannabis industry ‘wholly unacceptable’

As a female and a minority, I have experienced my fair share of barriers when it comes to breaking through glass ceilings. Though diversity is something that is talked about in theory with vigor, it is not always implemented in practice with that same energy. According to a 2017 Marijuana Business Daily study, minorities are woefully underrepresented in the cannabis industry. More than 80 percent of cannabis businesses are owned by whites, while blacks and Hispanics constitute barely 10% of business ownership combined. Given the rapidly changing demographics of our nation, this is wholly unacceptable. (Balt. Sun)

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Editorial: Women’s World Cup champs should celebrate as hard as they want

As the U.S. women’s national team celebrates its World Cup title before thousands of people during a parade in Lower Manhattan Wednesday, let’s hope the naysayers keep their thoughts to themselves. You know: the ones who condemned the team throughout the tournament for celebrating too hard. For having the audacity to dance, sing and grab each other in bear hugs after wins. Heaven forbid they imbibe a bit of bubbly too. The Daily Mail opined that the world was rolling its eyes as the cocky Americans declared their greatness. People on Twitter called the team sore winners and said they were not likable and lacked humility. (Balt. Sun)

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Bradford, Antoine: An Independent Redistricting Commission Is the Way Forward in Maryland

People are supposed to choose politicians, not the other way around. However, that certainly isn’t the case for the residents of Western Maryland. Republican representative Roscoe Bartlett was voted out of office after two decades of representing the 6th District in Congress after Democratic map drawers in Annapolis drastically altered the district following the 2010 census. Bartlett was drawn right out of office. A challenge to that partisan gerrymander, Lamone v. Benisek, was decided Thursday by the U.S. Supreme Court, and the people’s fight for redistricting reform in Maryland just got a little more complicated. (Md. Matters)

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Rodericks: The last thing Baltimore needs is more abandonment

A couple of weeks ago, a man named Smith wrote from Ellicott City to announce that he’s not going to the Inner Harbor anymore. In fact, he said, he’s going to avoid Baltimore altogether. It was a distressing letter to read. Smith cited a column I’d written about the Memorial Day chaos at the harbor — teenagers in big numbers, some of them fighting, six arrested for destruction of property and disorderly conduct. A lot of people freaked out about that. So I asked what they thought should be done about it. (Balt. Sun)

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Cowen: More immigrants and a census citizenship question are needed

 

The Trump administration is seeking to restore the citizenship question to the 2020 U.S. Census even after the Supreme Court ruled against it and the commerce secretary said the effort to do so would be dropped. The legality and practicality of this decision are unclear, and a federal judge has given the White House a Friday afternoon deadline to explain how it intends to proceed, but I would like to step back and consider some basic questions about this rather embarrassing debacle. Even if you are pro-immigration, as I am, I believe you should favor asking U.S. residents whether they are citizens when the population is counted. (News-Post)

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Lutz: Fixing the food system

Our food system is in crisis. In Maryland alone, one in every nine people is food insecure. In Baltimore, approximately a quarter of the population lives in food deserts, meaning they do not have easy access to healthy fruits and vegetables in grocery stores. When you expand this globally, billions of people are either hungry or eating too much of the least nutritious kinds of food. Yet, food waste is rampant. In the U.S., we waste between 30% to 40% of our entire food supply. That is equivalent to tossing out 133 billion pounds of food and pouring $161 billion down the drain annually. (Balt. Sun)

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Maryland needs to keep its electric vehicle credits rolling

In Maryland, a tax credit offered on July 1 will usually still be available on July 8. But not the state’s $3,000 credit to those who purchase or lease electric vehicles (or those that run on hydrogen). Faster than you can say lithium-ion, the credit state lawmakers passed just months ago was exhausted within the first week of the new fiscal year, the product of a backlog of car buyers and a shortage of funds to underwrite the credit. So that begs a question: If electric cars are so popular that $6 million is gone in a flash, should Maryland keep providing a tax incentive? (Balt. Sun)

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