Mohler:Stop Playing Croquet

This was supposed to be a blog about hope. It was supposed to shine a light on all that is good about our nation despite our current divisions. And then Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg left us. The outline that I had been carrying around in my head no longer seemed relevant. It didn’t capture the reality of the despair that so many are feeling. Why? Because elections have consequences, and those consequences have never been clearer.  With the passing of Justice Ginsberg, Donald Trump and his Republican sycophants are about to replace one of the great legal minds of our time with a justice whose judicial philosophy is, shall we say, more than just a tad to the right of center. By all accounts the replacement will be a middle age female jurist who will serve for decades and who will take away health care from millions of Americans, deprive women of their reproductive rights, and decimate the environment. (DonMohler)

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Mohler:Stop Playing Croquet

This was supposed to be a blog about hope. It was supposed to shine a light on all that is good about our nation despite our current divisions. And then Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg left us. The outline that I had been carrying around in my head no longer seemed relevant. It didn’t capture the reality of the despair that so many are feeling. Why? Because elections have consequences, and those consequences have never been clearer.  With the passing of Justice Ginsberg, Donald Trump and his Republican sycophants are about to replace one of the great legal minds of our time with a justice whose judicial philosophy is, shall we say, more than just a tad to the right of center. By all accounts the replacement will be a middle age female jurist who will serve for decades and who will take away health care from millions of Americans, deprive women of their reproductive rights, and decimate the environment. (DonMohler)

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Independent entity, not local prosecutors or attorney general, should investigate police misconduct

The tragic killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis earlier this year sparked outrage and ignited a feverish outcry against police brutality. The weeks and months that followed saw massive demonstrations and left lawmakers grappling to address what many people who look like me have always known — policing in America is broken. Black people in this country have suffered at the hands of those sworn to serve and protect, and that must end now. With state lawmakers considering widespread reforms to address police brutality, the role of local prosecutors in holding police accountable must be scrutinized. (Balt Sun)

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Our Say: Judge Michael Wachs needlessly rushed plea hearing in Tyrique Hudson’s murder

Judge Michael Wachs was clearly in a hurry Tuesday. The hearing to accept a guilty plea from James Verombeck found him not criminally responsible because he was insane, but the sentencing was nothing less than rushed. Wachs couldn’t be bothered to find a way for all members of Tyrique Hudson’s family, who traveled from North Carolina in search of answers, to watch the proceedings. Seating in his Annapolis courtroom was limited by social distancing rules intended to slow the spread of coronavirus, and the overflow room — where 25 people were asked to huddle around a television — wasn’t enough to accommodate members of Hudson’s church in North Carolina. (Cap Gazette)

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Andy Harris and the disappearance of decency in politics

Everyone would like to believe that they are fundamentally decent, yet it feels like decency is in short supply these days. So short we can only afford to extend it to those close to us, or worse, those who share our politics. That we believe different things, take different approaches, join different political parties or just generally disagree is not new. It is how we disagree and the lack of decency when we do that has become a pattern, and one we must change. (Balt Sun)

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Police reform should boost, not hamper, fight against violent crime

There are at least two things that every Maryland resident should know about how the General Assembly operates. First is that legislative committees routinely hold hearings throughout the year and not just during the 90-day annual session that begins in January. Second is that the purpose of such gatherings is to become better informed on what are often complex issues. And so hearing from experts as well as average folks, studying reports and even debating topics with fellow senators and delegates outside the three-month pressure cooker of the legislative session is simply never a bad thing. Oh, some lawmakers don’t like making the pilgrimage to Annapolis, but then the COVID-19 pandemic has this year made that moot. (Balt Sun)

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Caminiti: Wise voters exert political independence rather than the party line

“The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism.” So said George Washington of political parties in his Farewell address of 1796. According to a May 2020 Gallup poll, 40% of Americans identified themselves as Independent, 31% as Democrat and 25% as Republican. Yet in the 2016 election, 93% of voters cast a ballot for either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, according to Pew Research Center. Does this mean that 40% aren’t really independent? (Cap Gazette)

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EDITORIAL: Remember the 200,000 Americans who have died from covid-19 — and vote

Patricia Edwards. William Pursell. Carlos Vallejo. Betty McBride. Alfonso Cardenas. Tom Seaver. Johnny Lee Peoples and his wife, Cathy Darlene. Tootie Robbins. Mac Hodges. Robert Rhodes. Gilbert Polanco. Eli Sevener. Say their names. Remember their lives. Mourn their deaths. And be angry — very angry — that these people — an intensive care nurse, a musician, a doctor, a counselor, a local soccer club coach, a baseball legend, a couple married for 48 years, a son of sharecroppers who made it to the NFL, the mayor of a North Carolina town, a law professor, a longtime correctional officer and a 19-year-old just starting out in life — have been added to the United States’ mounting death toll from the coronavirus pandemic. (Wash Post)

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