How to keep Preakness at Pimlico

Saturday’s race won’t be the last time the Preakness Stakes is run at Pimlico, but it could be the second to last unless Maryland’s leaders get their acts together on a plan to preserve an irreplacable part of Baltimore’s history and culture, not to mention a major economic driver for a community that desperately needs it. The Stronach Group, which owns Pimlico, has committed to keep the race there at least through next year, but unless something happens, there’s every indication that they will try to move it to their other Maryland track, Laurel Race Course, in 2020. (Balt. Sun)

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Don't exempt Mayor Pugh from fundraising rules

Mayor Catherine Pugh’s willingness to beg, plead and cajole businesses and individuals to support key city priorities is one of our favorite things about her. She insists that everyone be a part of Baltimore’s revival, sometimes by asking them to contribute their effort and sometimes by asking them to contribute money. She doesn’t let the city’s limited funds limit her vision, and she doesn’t easily take no for an answer. Whether it’s the mobile job vans that she pitched during her campaign or buses to help city kids attend an anti-gun violence march in D.C., her advocacy has helped Baltimore do more than its tax base might otherwise allow. (Balt. Sun)

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Are gift cards for teacher purchases of school supplies the best we can do?

It’s an abiding mystery of our nation’s school systems — so abiding that not much has changed since we wrote this 16 years ago: “Imagine what would happen to recruitment and morale at a restaurant that had to consider asking all its employees to pitch in to buy food for the larder or silverware for the tables … Or at a newspaper that had to seriously consider passing the hat among its workers to buy newsprint and ink for the printing press. If such things actually happened, they would be taken as signs that the business or institution involved was on the edge of collapse.” (Capital)

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Brian Griffiths: Maryland needs a General Assembly special session to clear the way for sports betting

On Monday we learned of an important decision on gambling in our country. New Jersey had brought a case to the U.S. Supreme Court regarding the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, a 1992 law barring states — except those with pre-existing gambling laws — from allowing gambling on sporting events. In essence, this meant that Nevada was the only state allowed to offer betting on single-game sporting events. The Supreme Court decision returns federalism to the sports gambling landscape, reserving to the states the power to determine how to regulate gambling within their boundaries. But if you think sports betting will be coming to Maryland anytime soon, think again. (Capital)

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Chrystal Okonta: Interns add value, companies should pay them

The world of internships is a harsh one. I am getting a specialized degree in public health, so positions in my field are limited, with many qualified applicants vying for relatively few spots. And the application process is grueling. It’s practically a full-time job in itself — on top of going to school full time and working part time. The biggest shock for me, though, was finding out that many internships are unpaid. I am investing a significant amount of time and money into my graduate degree. I have education bills — and I have to eat. How can I be expected to comfortably accept unpaid work for the summer and beyond? (Balt. Sun)

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May 17 // The Post’s endorsements for Montgomery County’s council and school board

About 50 candidates are on the June 26 Democratic primary ballot for the Montgomery County Council, well over half of them vying for four at-large seats, three of them open because of term limits, on the nine-member body. In an overwhelmingly Democratic county, the primary winners are likely shoo-ins in November; no Republican has won a countywide election in 16 years. As the legislature for a jurisdiction of 1.1 million people, the council plays a central role in land use, transportation, housing and fiscal policy, among other matters; it also controls the purse strings for the school system, one of the nation’s largest, funded mainly by local taxes. (Wash. Post)

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Give the public a say in Kamenetz's replacement (and don't turn tragedy into a chance for political gain)

Kevin Kamenetz’s death was a shocking event for Baltimore County. Ramming through a vote for a replacement without even taking a few hours for the public to voice an opinion about what they’re looking for in the person who will take over as county executive for the remainder of his term would compound the trauma. Using the occasion to further the career of another elected official would be callous and disrespectful. (Balt. Sun)

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Annapolis incident shows why police body cameras are a good idea

Police officers are as human as any of us. And if most of us were in jobs in which everything we do or say in important situations was recorded on video, a lot of the resulting footage would leave us wishing desperately we could have a redo. But what police do in important situations can determine whether people are fined, sent to jail or wind up with criminal records that could follow them around for years. That means police need body cameras. The circumstances leading to this week’s dismissal of charges against a 23-year-old named Ryan Greenstreet show why. (Capital)

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