Kerman: To flatten the curve, free some prisoners. Please.

Governors, sheriffs, judges and county officials who want to flatten the curve of covid-19 infections in their communities must get serious about reducing overcrowded jail and prison populations. Our nation’s prisons and jails will soon become uncontrollable super-spreaders of this pandemic — and the reach will extend beyond their walls and barbed wire fences. (Wash Post)

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Pitrelli: With Calloway house teardown looming, an activist laments the lack of leadership that let it happen

I came prepared for battle, but now I am feeling defeated. Since late 2018, I have been working to preserve the 2200 block of Druid Hill Avenue, which I discovered includes the childhood home of Baltimore’s Cab Calloway. Peter Brooks, Cab Calloway’s grandson, became actively involved in the effort to save what was his grandfather’s home in the early 1920s. Peter and I joined forces and worked together to preserve his family’s legacy. (Balt Brew)

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Editorial: United Airlines made it harder to get a refund amid coronavirus pandemic

The travel industry, like many others, has been hit hard by coronavirus, with airlines, lodging and rental car companies struggling to survive as entire countries go into lockdown mode and limit travel. This isn’t their fault, of course. It’s also not the fault of their customers, many of whom have had to cancel long-held plans to protect their health or comply with government directives. Some businesses have recognized this and made the smart customer-relations decision to allow clients to cancel without penalty, rather than risk their lives to complete a booking. (Balt. Sun)

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Pitts Jr.: Hardcore believers still trust Trump - even as people die

“No, I don’t take responsibility at all.” And yet, many of us still believe. Meaning the ones who whine how the “fake news” is being mean to Mr. Trump when they call him to account for bungling the coronavirus pandemic. Meaning the ones who think the real illness is “Trump Derangement Syndrome”: an inability to appreciate the genius of a man who is, as presidents go, “the best one we’ve had.” Quoth Joanne, a reader from Ohio. (Balt Sun/Tribune)

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Editorial: Whatever happens in federal court, rest assured the future of trash disposal is not burning it

No question, it’s been a rough few time public health and not just because of the coronavirus outbreak. First, there was the Trump administration’s decision late last week to suspend enforcement of some major environmental laws giving power plants and some other large polluters a free pass to not only pollute the air and water but to not even bother to report it. The EPA’s reasoning? That the viral outbreak makes it too tough for these polluters to conform to rules designed to protect human health.(Balt. Sun)

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Waldman: A lot of bad things got into the rescue package. Here’s a list.

While the economic rescue package was being negotiated in Congress, Republicans pulled out a time-tested strategy: Find a frivolous-sounding provision your opponents put in their proposal, then have everyone bring it up over and over to make it look like they’re being unreasonable. In this case it was $25 million in funding for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts; any regular viewer of Fox News would have seen the Kennedy Center mentioned a dozen times. (Wash Post)

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Rep. David Trone: A Proposal to Expand Voting and Protect Public Health

Moving Maryland’s primary from April 28 to June 2 was the right thing to do. When Governor Larry Hogan made the announcement, Maryland joined six states in postponing primary elections because of the health risks associated with coronavirus, or COVID-19. The number has now more than doubled. The state should use the additional time to ensure every Marylander has the right and ability to vote safely during this public health crisis. (Md Matters)

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EDITORIAL: Baltimore shrinks below 600K: A renewed call to action

Census estimates suggesting that Baltimore has lost population have become a rite of spring for the last half-decade. But there is something particularly worrisome about this year’s edition as it estimates for the first time since before the 1918 flu outbreak that Charm City’s population has fallen below 600,000 — 593,490 as of last July 1 to be precise. Perhaps 600,000 is a psychological barrier. Baltimore is now smaller than Louisville and only slightly larger than Milwaukee. (Balt Sun)

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