June 19 // Leana Wen: What bullets do to bodies

It was just after midnight when the call came in. “Fifteen-year old male, single G.S.W.” — gun shot wound — “to the abdomen,” I heard over the loudspeaker. “Stable vitals.” Earlier that night, we had treated another young man who had been shot in the abdomen. He’d been hit just outside the hospital and walked in, clutching his belly and yelling in pain. The bullet went straight through the left side of his abdomen, puncturing his spleen, before it exited through a small wound in his upper back. (New York Times)

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Krishanti Vignarajah: Larry Hogan’s silence on the Paris agreement is only his latest climate transgression

Not long ago, the United States led the world in confronting climate change. By the end of the Obama administration, thanks in part to the White House’s dogged persistence and nuanced diplomacy, 195 countries had signed the Paris climate accord. For the first time, in a truly global pact, every country that contributes more than 1 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases, except Russia and Iran, agreed to reduce emissions. But President Trump has recklessly signaled that the United States intends to withdraw from that agreement. A spokesman for Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said, "This is not an action the governor would have taken." That tepid ambivalence is not leadership. (Wash. Post)

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Ocean City says no to beach nudity

All kinds of important issues like gun violence and the heroin epidemic result in hand-wringing and consternation as experts and officials debate what should and could be done and by whom. But in Maryland's only seaside resort town, all it took to get swift and decisive action was the thought of "topless" and "Ocean City" being uttered in the same sentence. Ocean City Maryland is not a topless beach. Never was and, if civic leaders have their way, never will be. And that's the way people want it. (Daily Times)

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Rick Blatchford: Maryland Democrats let AG Frosh flex his new muscle

It seems I’ve lost count of the number of times that I’ve been ashamed to be a Maryland (aka California east) resident. It’s extremely difficult to be a non-Democrat in this state — not impossible, but all too frequently frustrating. It’s absolutely inconvenient. Now we have to put up with the shenanigans of Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh. Perhaps in collusion with the machine (aka the General Assembly), Frosh has decided to join the District of Columbia in suing President Donald Trump for an alleged violation of the U.S. Constitution — specifically Article I, Section 9 (clause #8 — the now infamous emolument clause). (News-Post)

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Barry Rascovar: Judge shouldn’t play Humpty-Dumpty with Md. universities

It could be a cringe-worry moment when U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake finally rules on the lawsuit by black state universities demanding sweeping changes in Maryland’s public higher education system that benefit only their own campuses. In no way is Judge Blake qualified to disassemble Maryland’s well-regarded higher education network and then re-assemble the pieces in an entirely new way that miraculously makes historically black schools integrated and thriving learning institutions. (Md. Reporter)

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Richard A. Bendis: Innovation ecosystem vital to state

Robust private-sector investment and prudent regulation from policymakers have helped establish Maryland as a cradle of innovation and a leader in the U.S. innovation economy. Few states can match Maryland's highly skilled workforce, market access and technology-centered policy incentives, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce ranked Maryland No. 1 in the country for entrepreneurship and innovation. But continued leadership of the region — and the ability of the region to continue to reap the economic and jobs benefits of innovation — is not a given. It requires constant cultivation and smart action from our elected officials. (Capital)

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Steve Schuh: Inclusive process ended with budget that advances our major goals

If there is one word to describe this year's budget season, it would be inclusive. Our process commenced in February and March, when we began meeting with the public to better understand their priorities. At two town halls, our departments met face to face with constituents from across the county to discuss school funding, park improvements and other important community priorities. From there, our administration went to work to put forward a budget that would advance our goal of making Anne Arundel County the best place to live, work and start a business in Maryland. (Capital)

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Ruling should spur Annapolis toward arts policy

A Maryland District Court judge recently ruled on the case of the mural painted by artist Jeff Huntington on the building at 51–53 West St., ending only one chapter of an ongoing conflict about the role of public and publicly viewable art in our Historic District. In June 2015, after 51–53 West St. was cited by the city for peeling paint, its property owners decided to paint the building with a mural and secured the necessary permits for equipment and sidewalk access prior to having their building painted. (Capital)

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