Pollock: Abate gun violence with public health, defense technology

Baltimore’s unrelenting epidemic of gun violence leaves city and police officials scratching their heads about how best to abate this public health scourge. Over the last 10 years, more than 3,000 people have died from violence, the majority of them in incidents that involved firearms. In the month of June there were nearly three dozen murders, with 13 individuals shot in one weekend. Each day multiple shootings are reported across the city; many of the victims are bystanders, their only transgression being that they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. Few neighborhoods escape the perception or reality of violence in Baltimore. The answer to the question about how to abate gun-related violence lies in part with modern tools and technology borrowed from public health and defense. (Balt. Sun)

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Witcover: Get ready for another overcrowded round of candidate debates

Apparently on the theory that one bad turn deserves another, the next Democratic National Committee round of 2020 presidential candidate debates in July will again be held on two consecutive nights, with 10 contenders taking the stage at one time. Included again will be two distinct outsiders in politics — inspirational speaker Marianne Williamson and technology guru Andrew Yang. Each survived the cut by acquiring 1 percent support in three public opinion polls and 65,000 individual donors. At least 10 of the other qualifiers are politicos of very modest recognition in the world of Oval Office wannabees. (Balt. Sun)

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Tear Cab Calloway's house down — there are better ways to preserve his legacy

It is important to preserve history. Too many communities erase their roots in the name of callous revitalization. Long-time residents in Harlem a few years ago were right to protest the attempted renaming of part of the historic neighborhood to “SoHa,” in what seemed like a move away from the neighborhood’s rich African American and civil rights history. We also understand why just a few months ago natives of Washington, D.C., pushed so hard for the right of a local electronics store to play go-go music despite protests from newer residents not familiar with the musical genre steeped in local culture. (Balt. Sun)

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Editorial: The arrival of an economic winter

Just two years ago, we started hearing warnings that the economic vitality of the Washington region — and especially suburban Maryland — was weakening. We called it then the first chill of impending winter. Last year, winter arrived. According to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, commercial construction in the Washington metropolitan region fell by 28 percent in 2018. While that was a precipitous decline, Maryland’s building industry recorded an absolute disaster, by far the worst numbers in the region. Our state added just 1.4 million square feet of new commercial space, the lowest amount in any single year since 1956. For a little perspective, that was the year President Dwight Eisenhower was re-elected to his second term in the White House. (News-Post)

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Bruno, Paul: 'Summer SNAP' will help feed low-income kids when school's out

As family physicians in Baltimore, we see the links between food and health every day. Children in families that are “food insecure” are at increased risk for poor health outcomes and school performance, as well as behavioral issues. Toward the end of last summer, a 12-year-old boy came in for a well-child exam with his mom. He was shy and well-appearing, except for a significant weight gain. His mom had meant to sign him up for a sports camp, however, the associated expenses and working multiple jobs with erratic hours had made it difficult to do so. He reported that he spent most of the day at home or hanging out with friends. (Balt. Sun) 

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Wen: My miscarriage has made my commitment to women’s health even stronger

The turkey sandwich I always had for lunch tasted different. My colleague’s perfume was suddenly overpowering. I could hardly keep awake; when I slept, I had leg cramps and vivid dreams.  I knew before I took the test: I was pregnant. I was thrilled. My husband and I had been trying for months. We wanted another child, a sibling for our son, Eli, now almost 2. I’m 36; my husband is 44; we didn’t want to wait much longer.Though I worried about how I would do my demanding job with two small children, I also believed that fulfilling my deep desire to expand our family would send a strong message for the organization I represent: (Wash. Post)

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Editorial: Montgomery County Executive Marc Elrich got it right on Olney tower

It was with great disappointment that we read the June 26 editorial “Public safety vs. NIMBYism” that wrongfully accused Montgomery County Executive Marc Elrich of ceding to NIMBYism as a consequence of his well-reasoned decision to relocate two towers of a newly proposed 22-tower public safety communication system. The editorial was right that Mr. Elrich inherited the current failing system. But there are other facts the public should know. The project team for this joint Montgomery County/state of Maryland communications system intentionally ignored Olney people when selecting as a site for its 368-foot-tall steel tower the side of Georgia Avenue at the very entrance into the community. (Wash. Post)

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Trump’s Fourth of July plans just keep getting worse

In recent weeks, readers have written letters to The Post recounting their memories of gathering on the Mall and watching the fireworks on the Fourth of July. Claire O’Dwyer Randall remembered her father driving her family in a 1939 DeSoto sedan “as close as we can get” to the Mall. Mary Resnick wrote about “our” special spot on the steps of the reflecting pool, surrounded by tens of thousands of “our best friends.” Carol Cavanaugh explained how the celebration was her annual reminder of the United States as glorious melting pot. (Wash. Post)

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