Lunday: Life lesson from the Orioles: the importance of playing the long game

It has been 21 years since I moved to suburban Baltimore from my hometown in the Finger Lakes. I migrated south to live with, and later marry, my college sweetheart. A lot has changed since the summer of 1998, most significantly the arrival of our two children, Lucy and Isaac, who are now 11 and 9. Before the kids came along, we did a lot of the usual 20-something, Charm City couple things, including going to Camden Yards on random weeknights after work just because we could. We watched Albert Belle have some really good — and then not so good — games. (Balt. Sun)

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Eshoo and Schiff: China’s grip on pharmaceutical drugs is a national security issue

If you take a pill every day to treat high blood pressure or high cholesterol, you probably don’t spend much time thinking about where those drugs come from or what you would do if your pharmacy suddenly couldn’t fill your prescription. But when it comes to the sources of their prescription drugs, what Americans don’t know can hurt them. Most of the drugs Americans take — as much as 90 percent — are generics. But before such drugs arrive at pharmacies in pill form, they start as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). (Wash. Post)

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Ganem: Low Md. PARCC scores may be caused by poor questions

Which three statements can be represented by the expression 24 [divided by] 4? A. Jake makes 24 muffins. He gives away 4 muffins. B. Collin has 24 toy trucks. He sorts them into groups of 4 trucks each. C. Amira has 24 trading cards. She puts them into piles containing 4 cards each. D. Rosemary puts 24 stickers in each book. She uses enough stickers to fill 4 books. E. Steven fills a new bookshelf with 24 books. He puts the same number of books on each of the 4 shelves. Perhaps those puzzled by the failing math scores of Maryland students on the PARCC test should examine the questions. (Balt. Sun)

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Rodricks: Undermining science and government vigilance are hallmarks of the Trump presidency

Given the ridiculous side-show that just passed before our eyes — the president tweeting inaccurate information about the path of a hurricane, then spending days trying to prove he was right and, in the process, politicizing the government agency responsible for weather forecasts — it’s important to remember what happened in Galveston on Sept. 8, 1900. (Balt. Sun)

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Schmitt, Alexandro: Maryland’s Bay Clean Up Plan Lags Behind

The Chesapeake Bay states recently released their final Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs), which are federally required to demonstrate how each state will meet its clean water commitments for restoring the Bay by 2025. The multi-state clean-up effort, officially known as the Chesapeake Bay TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load), was a response to the Bay’s steady decline in health almost a decade ago — with widespread dead zones and a steep decline in fish and shellfish populations. (Md. Matters)

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Nolen: The ‘seatbelt’ approach to the opioid crisis

In the 1960s, the U.S. government began requiring that cars include seatbelts. It was an acknowledgment that driving poses risks, and that people do it anyway. Today, deaths per miles traveled are about one-fifth of what they were in 1965. Imagine if America approached its overdose crisis the same way. (Balt. Sun)

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DeFillippo: Will Md. Comptroller Peter Franchot suffer the Louis Goldstein curse?

Comptroller Peter Franchot, on a continuous loop of shameless self-promotion for governor, might suffer from the Louis L. Goldstein syndrome. Or curse. Goldstein, for the new arrivals, was Maryland’s beloved comptroller (Louis pronounced it COMP-troller), fussbudget, cornpone, dumb-as-a-fox, country lawyer for 40 years – that’s 10 terms – and before that a legislator for 20 years, including president of the Senate. (He named one of his daughters Senate.) (WTOP)

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Simmons: Washington Redskins stadium talks should resume in D.C.

 

RFK Stadium is headed for the graveyard. Sniff, sniff. Plans call for the aged structure to be demolished in 2021. Up ‘til then, though, Dan Snyder has a decision to make, Congress has a decision to make about the site and both should place their bets on a guaranteed moneymaker — a new home for the Washington Redskins. (Wash. Times)

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