Children's museum would help creativity blossom in Salisbury

If all goes according to plan, Salisbury will soon be home to the Minds In Motion Children's Museum, the brainchild of a small group of area moms who have backgrounds in education. Vira Ogburn, who teaches children living in homeless shelters, along with retired educator Debra Sue Giles and Giles' daughter, Heather Charlton, who teaches at Fruitland Primary School, are the driving force for the project. It's not the first such effort in Salisbury. During the 1990s a more specialized version of this concept, the Excel Interactive Science Museum, operated at several locations. This enterprise was a hit for a period of time, but relied on volunteers to keep it going, plus donations of space. (Daily Times)

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Dick Cook: Ben Franklin High School is one of the Baltimore's best, despite scores

Baltimore City has many reasons to be proud of Brooklyn's Ben Franklin High School. It was designated one of the country's five best community schools in 2015. Its teen parenting center ensures young mothers' graduation. Its family stability program kept 120 families from losing their homes. Its 80 partners — including small businesses, social service agencies, corporations and churches — provide internships, tutoring and other resources for students and their families. (Balt. Sun)

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Emily Conrad: Empathy is needed in opioid crisis

Three strikes and you’re out. That’s the way it’s always been, right? But what if that were applied to our chances at living? You get three chances to make the right decision, and if you don’t, you die. Sounds like the premise of a terrible teenage horror movie. But this could be real life now for some people. The town of Middletown, Ohio, recently opened the discussion to the world: Should fire, EMS and police continue to revive patients from drug overdoses? And how many chances should they get? (News-Post)

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August 4 // Governor Hogan's 'volunteer' cabinet secretaries

It was inevitable that Gov. Larry Hogan’s secretaries of planning and health would sue over their strange predicament: The attorney general’s interpretations of Maryland’s constitution and language in the state budget produced a paradox by which Mr. Hogan had the right to appoint them to their jobs but not to pay them. Governor Hogan clearly had no intention of backing down in his dispute with the Senate over these two nominees, and there was no practical way for the legislature to take back its budget language restricting their pay, even if it wanted to. The constitutional questions raised in this lawsuit — dealing with the separation of powers, the legislature’s budgetary authority and other issues — need to be resolved. (Balt. Sun) 

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Petula Dvorak: Blocking critics from Facebook: Don’t run for public office, if you can’t take heat from voters

The father of our country knew something about bad press. Americans loved George Washington, but it didn’t take long for newspapers to start slamming him on everything from domestic policy to his political principles. He chafed at the criticism, sure. But he did not silence his critics. Because back in 1783, Washington said, “the freedom of Speech may be taken away — and, dumb & silent we may be led, like sheep, to the Slaughter.” That brings me to Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, who needs to work on being more like Washington. (Wash. Post)

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Tricia Bishop: Take your own advice, commissioner: don't rush to defend officers accused of wrongdoing

I understand Police Commissioner Kevin Davis’ impulse in wanting to stand up for his officers after two body camera videos appeared to show them staging drug recoveries in separate incidents. After all, we don’t really know what the recordings show, just what we think they show, and his department already has its hands full dealing with allegations of corruption and brutality. He doesn’t want to take more hits than he has to. But the way he went about it — much like the way our president recently suggested cops are “too nice” to suspects — is no way to support law-abiding law enforcement in Baltimore or to build trust in the community. (Balt. Sun)

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Frazier vs. Taneytown a black eye all around

Visiting Judge Lawrence Daniels made the right call earlier this week when he ruled that the city of Taneytown did not willfully violate the Maryland Open Meetings Act when it held a closed meeting last June — a suit that was brought by Robin Bartlett Frazier, a former county commissioner and wife of current Taneytown City Councilman Donald Frazier. However, the entire case is a black eye for both the city of Taneytown and the Fraziers. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Don DeArmon: Pressing city election issues — geese, butts and blowers

When asked at a meeting of city of Frederick candidates by the local Democratic committee what it could do to help, one candidate quipped: “Let people know there’s an election!” Yes, it’s an election year in the city of Frederick. Yard signs are sprouting. Candidates are door-knocking. Forums are upcoming. Questions abound: Will Mayor Randy McClement escape the “curse” of incumbents reaching for an extra term? (Jim Grimes was defeated for his third term in 2001; Ron Young was defeated for his fifth term in 1989.) Will late-entry Shelley Aloi surprise the Republican status quo? (News-Post)

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