Myles: The risks of campaigning while black in 'progressive' Maryland

Do I have my nametag? Am I wearing a shirt with a front pocket in case I have to video record a police interaction? Is my shirt tucked in? Avoid any houses with a “no soliciting” sign. Am I standing too close to the door? Did I knock too loud? Be sure to be home before the street lights come on. I am a tall black man running for a city council seat in Rockville, Md., and that is a small subset of my “campaign checklist” — the litany of questions I ask myself each time I go to knock on doors (canvass) to meet voters. (Balt. Sun)

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Page: On abortion, voters still lean to the wobbly middle

Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden is taking heat and light for his recent switcheroo on abortion rights. But Mr. Biden is hardly alone in his inconsistency on this volatile issue. Some of us remember how now-president Donald Trump made a famous abortion switcheroo too. Mr. Biden's big switch came in early June, two days after he reaffirmed his support for the Hyde Amendment, which bans federal funding for most abortions. For decades, the mostly pro-choice Mr. Biden voted nevertheless for the Hyde Amendment, citing his Catholic faith and a belief that anti-abortion taxpayers should not have their tax dollars used to fund abortions. (Balt. Sun)

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David: Uniting alumni of the foster care system to help others

“Connect. Thrive. Grow” is the mantra of the Fostering Change Network, an organization that takes the importance of networking and the value of experience and unites individuals with that experience to benefit alumni of the foster care system throughout the nation and the world. This concept is the amazing vision of Shalita O’Neale. O’Neale founded Fostering Change Network as a way to use her 15 years of experience in child welfare training, program development and advocacy to connect young professionals with people with foster care histories, like her, through local and national professional networking events. (Daily Record)

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Sam: We can't turn away from border crisis

Like many people, I spent the weekend enjoying the beautiful weather — in my case, with my 4-year-old toddler and 8-week-old newborn. During late night feedings and naps, though, I also spent hours on social media. I shared happy pictures of my babies, but also, in a heartbreaking juxtaposition, pored over the latest news from the border. For those who haven't read about it, multiple news outlets, from the New York Times to Fox News, reported that hundreds of children as young as 2 are being held in inhumane conditions. (Balt. Sun)

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Sutton: Shunning people won't make them change

Friday morning, I woke up to the news that the president had called off a missile strike on Iran at the last minute. A missile attack that was a consequence of the Trump administration’s decision to turn away from a diplomatic agreement with Iran. In place of the diplomatic agreement, President Donald Trump has implemented a “maximum pressure” approach defined by tough economic sanctions and belligerent rhetoric that amounts to telling Iran they are a horrible country and only when they do exactly as the USA wants can we work together. (Balt. Sun)

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Lazarus: Baltimore fashion designer Bishme Cromartie represents 'best of the city'

In a period when there seems to be so much bad news about Baltimore, fashion designer Bishme Cromartie represents the best of the city. Earlier this month, we watched as he reached the final four contestants on this season’s “Project Runway.” Throughout the competition, Bishme spoke of how his designs were inspired by his hometown — Baltimore. His understated and endearing personality came through in every interview. However, because he did not win, his fashions and his incredible journey did not get the attention they deserve here at home. This is in spite of the fact that his work has already been featured in Elle, Vogue, WWD and many other major publications, and many celebrities are wearing his creations. (Balt. Sun)

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Rodericks: Reverse Baltimore's population slide: Find investors for 'an incredibly high-potential city'

Call me a skeptic when it comes to government-hatched plans to spur private investment in the most distressed “zones” in U.S. cities, including Baltimore. We had Enterprise Zones and Empowerment Zones, and now Opportunity Zones, the latest program of tax incentives for potential investors. Will this one be a truly transformative, sustainable anti-poverty program? Will it create new jobs, new homes and small businesses in neglected neighborhoods? Will it help reverse the city’s population decline? The answer to all that, at this point, is a big maybe. Intuitively, Opportunity Zones seem to have more potential for success than previous “zone” programs because the incentives are so much better. (Balt. Sun)

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Beyer: In Praise of Jamie Raskin, and Others Like Him, This Stonewall Anniversary

As I prepare to travel back home to New York for the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising this weekend, I’m reading the preparatory essays on the occasion in The New York Times and elsewhere on social media. I’ve been struck by the narratives focusing on the noble oppressed who rose up and sparked a revolution, and I’ve noticed how those narratives have been constrained by today’s culture. The people being highlighted are the choices of those with access and pull today. They are probably not the folks who would be chosen by the veterans who were present, or even the veterans who are still alive. (Md. Matters)

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