Johns Hopkins protesters and administration need to find middle ground

Something has to give. Protesters have taken over the Johns Hopkins University administrative building for a month now with little indication they are willing to give up on their demands. They have disrupted university officials so much that Garland Hall, home to the offices of President Ronald Daniels, has been shut down. (Balt. Sun)

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Thomas: Signs of the times

It took a few days, but the New York Times finally got around to apologizing for publishing in its international edition a grossly anti-Semitic cartoon depicting a blind President Trump wearing a yarmulke and being led by a dog resembling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The dog wore a Star of David around its neck. (Balt. Sun)

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What Baltimore needs now that Catherine Pugh has resigned as mayor

Catherine Pugh’s resignation as Baltimore mayor trades one kind of uncertainty for another. We are spared now the possibility that a leader whose moral and political capital was erased by the Healthy Holly scandal would attempt to return to power, but we are confronted with more profound questions about the direction of the city. The 2016 election in which she won office and a new crop of City Council members swept into City Hall carried with it the hope for a post-Freddie Gray reordering of Baltimore policy and priorities. (Balt. Sun)

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Mayor Jack Young needs to get back to Baltimore — now

At 3:30 p.m. today, a private attorney stepped in front of a bank of microphones in his downtown Baltimore office and told the city that the mayor had resigned. Catherine Pugh wasn’t there. She hasn’t been seen or heard from in public in weeks. Bernard C. “Jack” Young, the former City Council president who is now mayor, wasn’t either. He’s in Detroit at a conference. Andre Davis, the city solicitor who reportedly drafted the resignation letter that Ms. Pugh signed, wasn’t either. Read the official resignation letter signed by Catherine Pugh, effective May 2, 2019. (Balt. Sun)

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Md. school rating system useless 'pseudoscience'

The recently implemented “star rating system” for public schools in Maryland is under attack for being too easy. Multiple factors determine a school’s rating, but so far most of the state’s schools (60 percent) are doing well — earning at least four stars or better on a five-star scale. Some have questioned why most schools rate this high and have pressured the state Board of Education to change the weightings of various factors in order to lower the average school rating. A better question not being asked is: What actionable insights about education in our schools do these ratings provide? (Balt. Sun)

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Whether she resigns or stays, we need to hear from Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh herself

The public has not heard from Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh in a month. The acting mayor, Bernard C. “Jack” Young, who’s in Detroit for a conference, hasn’t so much as gotten a phone call from her in weeks. All we know about her status and intentions comes from a private attorney, Steven Silverman, and now he’s telling us that at 3:30 today in his office — not the mayor’s residence, not City Hall — he will inform Baltimore of who its mayor will be. Whether Ms. Pugh will even be in the room is a mystery. (Balt. Sun) 

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Under Armour’s Turnaround Story Is Still Missing Something

If you’re a believer that Under Armour Inc. has put a challenging era behind it, then its first-quarter earnings report Thursday gave you some credible support for your optimism: The athletic apparel company raised its full-year guidance for earnings per share and gross margin. One of Under Armour’s most urgent priorities recently has been revamping and streamlining its supply chain, and these updated figures suggest that work is continuing apace and starting to bear fruit. Also, I was pleasantly surprised to see that inventory decreased 24 percent in the quarter from a year earlier to $875 million. (Wash. Post) 

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Maryland Democrats compromised on their speaker for the good of the party

Politics requires compromise. The alternative is collapsing into chaos — which is exactly what Maryland Democrats risked as they chose the next speaker of the House of Delegates. The bitter and racially charged contest between Del. Maggie McIntosh (Baltimore City), a gay white woman, and Del. Dereck E. Davis (Prince George’s), a black man, almost led to a self-inflicted crisis for the party in power — and the state — until House Democrats reached a smart compromise by picking Del. Adrienne A. Jones (Baltimore County), a black woman, to lead the chamber. (Wash. Post) 

 

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