Philip Wegmann: Liberty University should uninvite Ray Rice and Tomi Lahren

While Jesus Christ hung out with tax collectors, prostitutes, and sinners of all stripes, the son of God never invited the unrepentant to minister to the impressionable. The clergy at the helm of Liberty University are not so cautious. The evangelical college aims at educating new Christian disciples. Apparently, that task requires bringing a wife beater and a pro-abortion narcissist on campus. The Liberty Office of Spiritual Development announced Monday that former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice and current firebrand Tomi Lahren will speak at convocation. (Examiner)

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November 27 // State needs a balanced approach to beer law reform

When Dec. 5 rolls around, take a moment and have a celebratory drink — maybe a nice Maryland-made beer. That will be the day America marks the real end of the worst social engineering experiment in modern history, Prohibition. You might take it a step further and look for a spot on Ritchie Highway to have a snort in honor of Gov. Albert Ritchie, a leader of the “wets” who eventually ended this historic mistake. This is relevant now because Comptroller Peter Franchot is pushing his 12-point “Reform on Tap Act of 2018” to fix what he calls antiquated laws stifling the growth of microbreweries in Maryland. (Capital)

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John Mathwin: Discarded in the Potomac: Bottles and cans, golf balls and boats

The Potomac River islands downstream of President Trump’s golf course (on the Virginia side) and Seneca Creek (on the Maryland side) are home to a wonderful variety of wildlife. Beavers, muskrats, raccoons, foxes and deer are regulars. My grandson once saw an otter here. There are more types of birds than I can list, but they include eagles, ospreys, several types of herons, egrets, mergansers, cormorants, hawks and owls, including screech owls. Sometimes wild turkeys visit. A couple of years ago, an enormous flock of snow geese rested here for a couple of hours before pushing south. The river holds carp, smallmouth bass, bluegills, suckers and channel catfish. There also is an astounding amount and variety of trash. (Wash. Post)

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J.H. Snider: Anne Arundel school board pick may have been invalid

The newly created Anne Arundel School Board Appointment Commission appoints school board members to fill vacant seats on the Anne Arundel County Board of Education. Its commissioners must be duly appointed; otherwise, their official acts are invalid. On Aug. 24, the SBAC appointed Colin Reinhard to the Board of Education. But some commissioners voting for him weren’t duly appointed. If their invalid votes weren’t counted, the outcome could have been different. I unexpectedly discovered the sloppy appointment process after making a Public Information Act request for the official email correspondence of two of the 13 commissioners. (Capital)

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Albert Tucker: Planning process gives us a chance to safeguard our real property rights

In a stunning assault on common sense and clear legal precedent, Anne Arundel County land-use policies are being perverted by either a misunderstanding or a deliberate misrepresentation of what property rights actually mean. Property ownership comes with many rights, and zoning laws protect these rights. These laws establish restrictions on how a particular property can be used. Some see these laws as a violation of their right to the use of the property. The General Development Plan represents consensus on what the property rights of the community at large should be. These common rights are only protected when the GDP guidance is enacted in zoning laws and regulations. (Capital)

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Dan Rodricks: Freddie Gray case closed, and what's the lesson?

Have we finally reached the last page of the Freddie Gray story in Baltimore? If so, the ending looks not at all like the opening chapter. In April 2015, when we first heard about Gray’s life-threatening injuries, when we saw the first cellphone video of his arrest, it appeared to many that Gray had been injured by officers even before being dragged to a police transport van for a “rough ride” to the Western District. But in the end — after the protests and riot, after the criminal trials of the arresting officers, after a change in leadership in the Police Department and the mayor’s office, after a scathing Justice Department report and a consent decree calling for reforms in Baltimore policing — Gray’s death appeared to be what the longtime forensic pathologist Vincent DiMaio called it: a spinal cord injury from an accident in the back of the van. (Balt. Sun)

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November 22 // Michael E. Busch: Md. will protect health care even if U.S. won't

As we watch President Donald Trump and his Republican Congress sabotage Obamacare, many Marylanders have asked “What does this mean for us?” The short answer: We aren’t sure. But while the proposals coming out of Washington seem to change every hour, the Maryland General Assembly is leading an effort to be prepared for any outcome. Last session, we passed legislation creating the Maryland Health Insurance Coverage Protection Commission. The commission brings together a bipartisan group of health care professionals, advocates and citizens to follow the debate in D.C. and create state policy options to address this crisis. (Balt. Sun)

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Republican Central Committee can't do its one job

Over the past three years, the Republican Central Committee of Carroll County has had the opportunity to fill four vacancies — two in the state legislature and two internally. While, ultimately, we think the people chosen to fill those seats are doing or will do a fine job in their roles, it could not be more clear that the central committee’s processes are completely broken. (Carr. Co. Times)

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