John Leith-Tetrault: Ben Jealous could save you a bundle on health care

U.S. residents pay outrageously high prices for their prescription drugs. According to the online magazine The Hill, “Americans pay prices for prescription drugs that are two to six times the rest of the world, despite having personal incomes that are on par with many developed countries.” In fact, even though we constitute only 5 percent of the world’s population, international pharmaceutical companies realize about 60 percent of their total profits from within the United States, as reported in The Atlantic. (Balt. Sun)

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Marc B. Terrill: Synagogue shooting 'very personal'

On Monday, my family drove from Baltimore to Pittsburgh, where my wife was born and raised and much of our family remains, to pay respects to those killed in the mass shooting this weekend. And on Tuesday, as I stood outside the Rodef Shalom synagogue, where the first funerals were to be held, my heart was racing — and quickly breaking from grief and disbelief. Of the 11 souls brutally gunned down, two were cousins of my wife. Brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal were gentle, kind, fun loving, life embracing individuals. They were what is good and decent about humanity. And now, along with nine other remarkable people, they are gone. (Balt. Sun)

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November 1 // Ben Cardin for U.S. Senate

The fact that Maryland Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin has held public office since 1967, when Lyndon B. Johnson was president, is being used against him, predictably, in his campaign for a third term in the U.S. Senate. Unfortunately for his rivals, none of them particularly qualified for high elective office, longevity has dimmed neither his energy nor his abilities. Maryland's senior senator remains, as he has been for decades, a conscientious, substantive and ethical public servant. He deserves reelection. (Wash. Post)

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At the University of Maryland, the damage is done, and the regents' chairman must resign

Firing University of Maryland football coach DJ Durkin was the right thing to do in the wake of player Jordan McNair’s death. There is a strong case to be made that he was culpable to the extent that he allowed a dysfunctionally dangerous atmosphere to persist within the team that both led to McNair’s heat stroke and the woefully inadequate response to it. And it’s a near certainty that he would not have been an effective coach going forward. What parents would consent to sending their sons to play for him? What trust would current players have in his leadership? (Balt. Sun)

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The Aegis offers its opinion on the 2018 General Election

Election Day is less than a week away, but many Harford County residents have already flocked to the polls for early voting. As always, we reject in the strongest terms any and all angry, divisive, hate-filled partisan politics. Here are some other thoughts about the choices on the 2018 ballot. (Aegis)

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Noah Frank: DJ Durkin is out at Maryland, but nothing is fixed

What an incredible disaster. One day after announcing that it was keeping DJ Durkin as head football coach, the University of Maryland — awash in a tidal wave of justified outrage — reversed course and parted ways with him. I’m not using that news release term — “parted ways” — to make anything sound more dignified. I’m using it because they didn’t really fire him. They bought him out, the same way they bought out strength coach Rick Court. (WTOP)

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Lucie Lehmann: Why a lifelong Democrat voted for Larry Hogan

On a day when the news was full of package bombs sent to kill prominent Democrats and President Donald Trump spewed his daily vitriol like regurgitated Diet Coke, it would have been logical for me, a lifelong Democrat, to double down and vote the straight party ticket. How better, on the first day of early voting in Maryland, to send a message of unmitigated disgust about what’s happening politically in our country? Like many Americans these past two years, I’ve denounced the almost complete absence of competence, comity and compromise in Washington. And yet, also like many of my fellow citizens, I’ve harbored convictions that most of the problems lay with the elected leaders of the party that I didn’t vote for. (Balt. Sun)

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October 31 // Maglev between Washington and Baltimore could mean a lot more than a fast trip. It could help save the planet.

When Marylanders talk about maglev — the proposed magnetic levitation train that could whisk passengers from downtown Washington to Baltimore in 15 minutes, and eventually on to New York in an hour — they tend to think local. Would Baltimore instantly become a much more affordable bedroom community for D.C., or even Philadelphia and New York? Would it bring gentrification that would displace long-time residents, or would it be the shot in the arm the city needs? Would the super-high-speed train disrupt communities along the route with noise, vibration or electromagnetic fields? Could the financing of a project expected to cost $10 billion to $15 billion possibly be viable? Would tickets be so expensive that it would only benefit the well-to-do? (Balt. Sun)

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