Dwyer's resignation now long overdue

We called for Del. Don Dwyer’s resignation last year, after he admitted he was drunk while piloting a boat that got into an accident on the Magothy River, injuring several people, including children. The Pasadena Republican’s blood-alcohol content was three times the level that legally defines intoxication in this state. Obviously, our opinion is not going to change because of this week’s news that Dwyer was arrested and charged with drunken driving and other traffic violations, including driving a car with suspended and expired registration. (Capital)

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Buses returning to roads

Few people likely would say that they would place the safety of a child at risk for the opportunity to shave a minute or less from their commute, yet every school day drivers do just that when make the decision to pass school buses that are stopped with their lights flashing. (Carroll Co. Times)

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Blair Lee: Taxpayers exiting Maryland

The Tax Foundation is a well-respected research organization that has monitored federal and state tax levels since 1937. Its recent study of taxpayer migration between states is a fascinating look at which states are gaining or losing taxpayers and why. It also reports how much taxable income those taxpayers take with them. (Gazette)

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James Burdick: Delay in ACA's employer mandate nothing to celebrate

The glee with which Republicans greeted the delay in the employer coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act is heartless. Although it is politically motivated, such reveling will prove to be a political obstacle to Republican election chances in 2014. President Barack Obama's health care law is not going away. A groundswell of public opinion will welcome the reforms now under way to help correct the fundamental inequities in America's health care system. (Balt. Sun)

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William Noack: Diesel's day has arrived

One hundred and twenty years ago this summer — in 1893 — Rudolf Diesel fired up a single-cylinder engine attached to a flywheel. The contraption was fueled by peanut oil. He must have been relieved as the engine sputtered to life because Diesel had worked for years on a new idea: that higher levels of compression within the engine could ignite the fuel, thus replacing the spark required by conventional internal combustion engines. (Balt. Sun)

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Improving school security

Frederick County is not unique in its emphasis on protecting students from outside-the-classroom threats. School systems around the country are investing millions trying to prevent another school shooting like the one that took the lives of 20 students and six adults at those shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn. (News-Post)

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August 22 // AP classes: a glass half-full

It's really no surprise that top students at Maryland's highest-performing high schools are passing the Advanced Placement exams at rates far higher than their peers in the state's lower-performing schools. The test results reflect not just how much students have learned over the previous year in an AP class but how well their entire school experience has prepared them for college-level work. That's why raising AP pass rates across the board isn't just a matter of better facilities or teaching methods in a handful of advanced high school courses. Boosting the success rates for students in every school district will require a commitment to improving the quality of instruction at every level throughout a student's academic career, starting from the earliest years. (Balt. Sun)

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‘Saving summer’ at the expense of students’ learning

The costs of a later start to the school year greatly outweigh the benefits. This is 2013, not 1953, and there is no question that summer vacation, as “un-American” as it may be to curtail, contributes to the achievement gap between low-income students and their middle-class and affluent peers. Lower-income students already start school behind and most students typically lose about one month’s equivalent of learning each summer, no matter where they sit on the socioeconomic spectrum. That adds up over the years, and teachers eventually have no means of closing that gap during the academic year. (Wash. Post)

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