Burgess: When exactly was America so great?

So exactly when was America great? Was it when the Declaration of Independence said "All men (white males) were created equal?" Or when Founding Fathers like Thomas Jefferson bred slaves for profit to fund lavish lifestyles? Maybe in 1857 when President Buchanan (from Pennsylvania) strong armed the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott decision that said Africans were inferior species "not included, and were not intended to be included ... [as] citizens in the Constitution." (News-Post)

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Stevenson: Of failure and rejection

Have you ever failed or been renounced or both? Dumb question, eh? You have, and you know it. And if you say no, you might be a character of questionable interest regarding truth. Reaching a level of adulthood without experiencing a failure or rejection is rare. When we live into the years and have not known a setback, we are unusual indeed. Seemingly, the first step in relating to an adverse experience is to admit its reality. A “just forget it” response is never advisable. Countless numbers of people live alternate realities, wasting tons of energy that denial requires. A refutation of what was is never a healthy response. Admitting the making of a wrong turn may not be good news, but acceptance of it is important. (Herald-Mail)

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Rascovar: Some Truths about Mail-In Voting

With Donald Trump repeatedly flogging mail-in voting as a fraud on the American people (though he lacks evidence), voting analyst extraordinaire John Willis sent me an extended reply regarding Maryland’s summer mail-in primary. Willis served as Gov. Parris Glendening’s Secretary of State overseeing Maryland presidential elections. He also has a long record as an academic and published author on voting trends and results. He takes a far more positive view of Maryland’s mail-in primary that I did in a couple of columns, and which Gov. Larry Hogan has lambasted repeatedly. (Political Md)

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My school reopened on June 22. A teacher got Covid-19 just days later.

When the school where I work as a school psychologist reopened on June 22, about 20 of us on the education staff returned. My school is inside a juvenile detention center. In the spring, while we taught online classes, several Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) workers, who staff the facility 24 hours a day, had contracted the virus, as well as several youth. Fortunately, everyone recovered, and by mid-June there hadn’t been a case in the facility for a month. Statewide, Maryland had done well with flattening the curve. Many youth had been released, so we returned to only 35 students. (Balt Sun)

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Editorial: Stronger hurricanes, worsened wildfires, record heat - the climate warnings march on

After a stifling hot July that saw 25 days of 90-degree-plus weather — breaking a record that stood for nearly a century and a half — August swept into Maryland with tornadoes and torrential rain from Tropical Storm Isaias. While severe weather is not a new phenomenon, experts warn that this pattern of stronger, wetter hurricanes and tropical storms, and longer stretches of high temperatures in the summer, is likely a product of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. (Balt Sun)

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The 75th anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki reminds us of the need to ban nuclear weapons

In 1945, Jacob Beser, a 24-year-old air force lieutenant from Baltimore, was the only crew member to be on both flights that dropped atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Though he never regretted what he had done, according to his grandson Ari Beser, he felt he had to bear witness to the worst act of inhumanity of man against his fellow man. As we approach the 75th anniversary of Aug. 6 and Aug. 9, 1945, few are left to recall the shock as information leaked out about the atomic bombs that instantly destroyed two Japanese cities and propelled the whole world into the nuclear age. (Balt Sun)

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Our Say: Anne Arundel owed an explanation of shakeup at Maryland Legal Aid

Maryland Legal Aid is a private nonprofit providing free civil legal services to low-income people statewide, leveraging federal, state, county and private funds to pay for a wide variety of services. One of those services is representing tenants in rent disputes. So it is of particular concern that four of its most senior attorneys left suddenly — at least one was fired — after expressing concerns about reopening offices in the coronavirus pandemic. (Cap Gazette)

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EDITORIAL: Maryland’s governor continues his public health retreat

One of the mistakes commonly made during the recent public debate over whether to open schools this fall or conduct classes online has been to consider the ramifications only in the context of students, educators and their families. This is understandable. No one is more directly affected. But during the worst pandemic to hit this nation in a century, schools — public and private — must also be looked upon as potential transmission sites in the same way that bars, restaurants, churches, businesses and every other place where the public might gather must be. (Balt Sun)

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