Pringle: Horse racing industry needs uniform regulation

If each of the 32 NFL teams set their own rules for doping, there would be constant confusion and an outcry for reform. But that’s exactly how the horse racing industry operates. Spectators and viewers watching the Preakness Stakes on Saturday will see the spectacle of the crowds and competitive races, but they’ll likely be unaware that, unlike other national sports that have a single regulating body, horse racing has 38 jurisdictions overseeing approximately 100 racetracks in the United States. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Pitts: People are dying for nothing

"You don't have to be the hero." That, John Castillo told NBC News Wednesday, is something he had advised his 18-year-old son, Kendrick. If ever a shooter invades your school, son, don't try to confront him, don't take the risk. But Mr. Castillo said Kendrick had other ideas, telling his dad that he would not hesitate to defend other people's lives. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Mermer: Nurses must expect, demand better

“How often has your partner physically hurt, insulted, threatened with harm or screamed at you?" This four-item inventory, called "HITS" for short, is used to screen patients for domestic violence in primary care and hospital settings all over the world. In reflecting on my work as a bedside nurse at a community hospital, I often wonder how many times my patients have hurt, insulted, threatened with harm or screamed at me. The answer is once a week at best and multiple times per day at worst. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

A question for Baltimore’s inspector general

Baltimore’s Office of the Inspector General was created nearly 15 years ago, in July 2005. The instrument of creation: an executive order signed by then-Mayor Martin O’Malley. Reviewing the history of the office, the OIG’s most recent annual report noted that it was created “to be the ‘watchdog’ over City practices by ensuring accountability at all levels within City governance, operations and services,” the goal being “to improve City efficiency through the elimination of identified financial waste, fraud and abuse.” (Daily Record)

Read Full Article

Alternative Fact of the Week: Larry Hogan's Road shill bill

Two years ago, we called out Gov. Larry Hogan for declaring legislation requiring the state to rank the worthiness of its transportation construction projects a “road kill bill” that seriously threatened Maryland’s future. Even before “alternative facts” had entered the public nomenclature, it wasn’t hard to spot a political tall tale. We argued then — and later when a compromise was reached with the General Assembly — that publicly ranking projects meant little to nothing when a governor gets to choose the criteria for ranking and still has final say on what projects are actually funded no matter where they end up on the list. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Hettleman: Special education system stacked against parents

A recent story by Sun reporter Talia Richman exposed how parents of students with disabilities almost never win their legal appeals against Maryland school districts. That’s true and appalling. But it’s no surprise. In fact, it is only the tip of the iceberg of how the entire system of special education is stacked against parents. It’s not supposed to be that way. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Ellis: Sign tax sale bill, Gov. Hogan

For more than 75 years, the Baltimore City government has sold tax liens to the highest bidders for homes whose owners failed to pay their property taxes, water bills and other fees. Designed to turn tax delinquent properties over to tax paying owners, this system has had the opposite consequence in modern day Baltimore, where many properties are not marketable. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Schmuck: During Preakness week, unwanted sideshows overshadow Baltimore's best showcase

It was a beautiful spring day at Old Hilltop on Wednesday — the kind of day you might be tempted to call the middle jewel of Preakness week. Under normal circumstances, it would be the day the winner of the Kentucky Derby arrives at Pimlico Race Course and gets paraded before the media. It would start with a morning of Triple Crown talk around the stakes barn and end with the inside-baseball drama of the post-position draw in the late afternoon. This year, the biggest news Wednesday morning was that the water was running again. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article