Extent of bus troubles for county schools remains unclear

Political campaigns are organic. Candidates can plan all they want to run on this or that issues, but once the run to election day begins there’s no telling how it will go. So it is no surprise then that Anne Arundel County school bus schedules have become an issue in the first election season for the county Board of Education. This was on the agenda’s of some candidates for the school board in the June primary, but not all. (Capital)

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Goldilocks

What do Marylanders think about this, that and the other thing? Pollsters at Goucher College ask a few of us our opinions now and then, and the results usually are interesting. Len Lazarick writes for Maryland Reporter that while Marylanders seem to like some of the positions Democratic gubernatorial nominee Ben Jealous has taken, they also think incumbent Republican Gov. Larry Hogan is doing a good job and taking the state in the right direction. They can’t have it both ways. (Times-News)

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Gavin Buckley: Doing nothing is not who I am, and it is not what I promised

Friday, the temporary bike path and expanded sidewalks on Main Street of Annapolis will open. This project gives us a look at what we can do to create a network of trails that connect our city and bring our neighborhoods together. I have four goals with this trial bike path. First, this demonstration project can help determine whether the city should include a bike path and expanded sidewalks when it re-bricks Main Street. (Capital)

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Sedrick Smith: Seeking equity, not just equality, at Baltimore's City College

“I treat all of my students the same. I don’t play favorites” is a fairly common claim made in schools across the country. And while well intentioned, in a city like Baltimore, where many of our students come from homes that lack sufficient resources, treating students “the same” can sometimes mean widening the gaps between the haves and the have nots. The best and most dedicated teachers among us find innovative ways to create not equality but equity for their students. (Balt. Sun)

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Good news on two fronts downtown

Two pieces of excellent news appeared on our front page this week — and they were both in the same story. First, a Washington, D.C., developer is working on plans to bring a restaurant to the long-vacant PNC Bank Building at 2 E. Patrick St., on the Square Corner of historic downtown Frederick. At the same time, the proposal to use the very same building as a medical marijuana dispensary has fallen through. Two cheers for downtown. We’ll do the third cheer when the restaurant is finished and open. (News-Post)

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September 19 // Marylanders like Larry Hogan — and a $15 minimum wage

Among the many fascinating contradictions about Maryland’s electorate revealed by the latest Goucher Poll is that the only thing voters like more than our pro-business Republican Gov. Larry Hogan (67 percent approval rating) is one of the core goals of the progressive left — a $15 an hour minimum wage (69 percent support). That’s perhaps not quite as weird as the greater opposition among Maryland Republicans to the Affordable Care Act (80 percent unfavorable impression, 14 percent favorable) than straight-up, single-payer health care (72 percent unfavorable, 20 percent favorable). But it’s close. (Balt. Sun)

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Lower speed limit not a panacea for traffic deaths

The number of pedestrians killed in traffic has been on the rise in recent years even as traffic fatalities generally have not. There are any number of reasons for this trend, which only developed in the last decade. More people are driving (and walking) distracted. There’s more evidence of drugged driving. Bigger, heavier vehicles including SUVs — which have a corresponding larger impact in a crash — have become more commonplace. At least those are the leading theories. (Balt. Sun)

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Anne Arundel ethics reform a good start but needs a significant fix

Proposed changes to the Anne Arundel County ethics law are a good start. Updating the current code of conduct for lobbyists, county officials, employees and appointees should be a regular task of every administration in pursuit of good government. One glaring omission from the proposal introduced this week, however, must be addressed before the legislation is passed. There simply has to be a ban preventing anyone accepting a county-funded paycheck from acting as a lobbyist before county or state government agencies or legislative bodies. The only exception should be when the employee is working on behalf of his or her agency. (Capital)

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