Carmen Del Guercio: Proposed cuts to anti-hunger programs 'most significant' in decades

As more activists and organizations join the growing food recovery movement, it’s tempting to believe that food rescue is a new phenomenon. But we’ve been at it for nearly 40 years. In 1979, the Maryland Food Bank was formed as the nation’s third food bank with a simple idea: rescue good-quality food that would be otherwise thrown away and use it to help struggling families put food on the table. The basic premise of the work we do has not changed, although almost everything else has — particularly the quality of the food we distribute. (Balt. Sun)

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Charles Lane: Five Confederate statues in Maryland will be removed. Here are some candidates to replace them.

Wednesday night, Baltimore carried out its plans to remove four statues of Confederate generals and related figures from public spaces, by order of Mayor Catherine Pugh. Gov. Larry Hogan announced that the enormous seated sculpture of Chief Justice Roger B. Taney in front of the state legislature in Annapolis should also go. In short, five places of honor in prominent Maryland locations will soon be vacant — and there will be decisions to make about what, if anything, to put in them. Fortunately, there is no shortage of Marylanders whose records during the Civil War and Reconstruction make them worthy of memorialization today. (Wash. Post)

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David A. Plymyer: Baltimore police officer is a tough job, treat it as such

The task of persuading jurors in the City of Baltimore that they can rely on the veracity of officers of the Baltimore Police Department recently has gone from difficult to nearly impossible because reform of the department is not moving fast enough. Only dramatic changes are going to fix the problems, and only dramatic changes are going to restore the trustworthiness of BPD officers in the minds of city residents. Meanwhile, the hole the BPD is digging for itself keeps getting deeper. (Balt. Sun)

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Scott Novak: Plank gave Trump a pass on racism before, he shouldn't again

For too many people, President Donald J. Trump’s racism is not a deal-breaker when it comes to supporting him. Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank is but one high-profile example of this phenomenon. Mr. Plank joined Mr. Trump’s business advisory board and praised him in February, stating, “To have such a pro-business president is something that is a real asset for the country.” As someone who grew up in Harford County, I’m familiar with Mr. Plank’s position. Many of my family members here expressed the same sentiment when explaining to me why they support Mr. Trump. However, Mr. Trump has repeatedly exhibited a trait that is definitely not an asset for our country: blatant racism. (Balt. Sun)

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Erik Rifkin, Dr. Andrew Lazris: Gauging the real risks and benefits of a medical procedure

As Republicans assail the Affordable Care Act but find nothing to replace it, as Democrats seek Medicare for all, both are failing to address the most salient problem crippling our health care system: wasteful spending. The Institute of Medicine estimates that we squandered $750 billion in unnecessary medical spending in 2009, and recent estimates put that number closer to $1 trillion a year. In fact, 30 to 50 percent of medical interventions are of low value: They either do not help people, or they harm them. (Balt. Sun)

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August 16 // The scorpion on America's back

For the CEOs invited to sit on President Donald Trump’s business advisory councils, the calculus was pretty simple. Their job is not to exercise political or social leadership, it is to make money for their shareholders. To the extent that having a seat at the table when the administration considers issues related to taxes, regulations, immigration and other matters can increase shareholder value, they’ll take one. To the extent that associating the brand with Mr. Trump detracts from shareholder value, they’ll quit. That largely explains the line Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank tried to walk over the last several months. (Balt. Sun)

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Jennifer Rubin: Merck, Intel and Under Armour CEOs are right to leave Trump's advisory council

On Monday, Merck Chief Executive Kenneth Frazier resigned from the president’s manufacturing council with an elegant statement, which read in part: "Our country’s strength stems from its diversity and the contributions made by men and women of different faiths, races, sexual orientations and political beliefs. America’s leaders must honor our fundamental values by clearly rejecting expressions of hatred, bigotry and group supremacy, which run counter to the American ideal that all people are created equal." He did not criticize President Trump. He didn’t even mention his name. He set a moral example for his own company and for the country at large. Fortunately, another CEO did follow Frazier’s fine example. (Wash. Post)

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Randal O'Toole: Don't build the Purple Line

Maryland wants to spend $5.6 billion building and operating the Purple Line light rail at a time when transit ridership is declining, and that decline appears poised to accelerate. This is an especially foolish decision when the state’s own analysis says that the light-rail line will increase traffic congestion. (Wash. Post)

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