The Contemporary returns

It's been more than a year since the Contemporary Museum closed its doors in order to rethink its mission and reorganize its operations and staff. The economic downturn that began in 2008 hit Baltimore's most insistent institutional advocate for what a Sun critic once called "the art of right now" particularly hard, and its lingering effects eventually forced the museum to suspend exhibitions entirely and lay off its five-person staff in May 2012. There's been nothing quite like it since. That's why a report last week that the Contemporary's board has found a way to resume operations later this year is exciting news. (Balt. Sun)

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Fed and dead

There is a good reason Maryland has a law against feeding bears. The reason, unfortunately, played out last week in Westernport when a bear had to be shot by Maryland Wildlife & Heritage Service personnel. The bear, a 172-pound male, had been walking around town for more than a month because people were feeding it. (Cumberland Times-News)

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Police find help online

Police agencies in the county that aren’t utilizing social media are missing out on an opportunity to connect with residents, gain information about what is going on in neighborhoods and, perhaps, even get tips to help solve crimes. (Carroll Co. Times)

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Jonathan Hodgson: Defining victory in the Daryl Jones case

Years ago, there was a popular television show called ‘’MacGyver.’’ Every episode featured a unique problem that MacGyver would escape by constructing some sort of makeshift device from the scraps and tools at hand. In January 2012, the County Council faced a unique problem and couldn’t find a way out. One of its members was about to go to jail and had no intention of resigning his seat. It was a problem never before faced by the council. (Capital)

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Rodricks Who will claim $10,000 in savings bonds?

Part of Baltimore's Vacants to Value program, aimed at reducing vacant houses and blight across the city, calls for aggressive and streamlined enforcement of the housing code. That means heavy fines to owners who don't take care of their vacant houses. And if fines don't get action, the city will push a property to auction. (Balt. Sun)

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Mid-Atlantic casino war

When Maryland was first contemplating legalizing slot machines, supporters pointed to Delaware and the success of its "racinos" — racetracks with slot machine gambling — and how they drew in thousands of Maryland residents each year. Turns out there was something to that observation, because it appears those patrons are now sorely missed. The latest reports on 2012 gambling revenue from the First State show that the opening of Maryland Live Casino has had a staggering effect on Delaware's three racetrack casinos. (Balt. Sun)

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Women of the court

After her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sandra Day O'Connor observed that the significance of that decision was not that she "will decide cases as a woman, but that I am a woman who will get to decide cases." And so it is for Mary Ellen Barbera, the one-time Baltimore city school teacher who was appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley to Maryland's highest judicial office, chief judge of the Court of Appeals. Not only is Judge Barbera the first women to be named to head the state's judiciary, but with the elevation of Baltimore's Judge Shirley M. Watts from the Court of Special Appeals to the Court of Appeals, women now constitute a majority on the high court. (Balt. Sun)

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Delay is good for business

Delaying until 2015 the implementation of a requirement under the health-care law that employers provide coverage to workers or face fines is politically advantageous to Democrats going into the 2014 elections, but it is also good for companies that had expressed concerns about the provision in President Barack Obama’s sweeping health-care reform. (Carroll Co. Times)

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