You do the ’rithmetic 

275 hours, 52 minutes. That’s how long it takes to earn $2,000, working a minimum wage job in Maryland. Time is money for everyone, but for a low-income college student, the trade-off is especially stark: Time at work cuts into studying, while time spent studying cuts into the wages that have to cover tuition, fees, books, food and housing. (Daily Record)

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Food program a success

Maryland is among the best in the country when it comes to local food served in schools. According to the USDA’s recently released Farm to School Census, 21 percent of Maryland’s school food budgets are spent on Maryland-grown products, ranking fifth in the nation. Maryland is also one of only eight states in the nation in which more than 75 percent of its school districts, including Carroll, are participating in farm to school activities. (Carr. Co. Times)

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The Daceys' dirty trick

Normally, we’d have reserved this space to congratulate the winners of Frederick’s election. Instead, we’re already having to take Alderman-elect Phil Dacey and his campaign to the woodshed for underhanded politics, whether he authorized it or members of his campaign did. Ted Dacey, the candidate’s brother, acknowledged asking the state GOP to make a last-minute robocall on Tuesday attacking Democrat Donna Kuzemchak over nonpayment of taxes — payments she subsequently honored. (New-Post)

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Nov. 7 // Close Mayoral Race Reflects An Unhappy Electorate

If Josh Cohen pulls this race out on the absentee votes, he’ll want to think long and hard about why so many Annapolitans seem to be unhappy with him. If Mike Pantelides wins, his first order of business will be establishing good relations with a Democrat-dominated City Council. Meanwhile, what some city residents may want to think about is why they didn’t vote. (Capital)

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Diamond: Bar exam does not a lawyer make

Last week, more than 1,500 people — most of them recent law school graduates — found out whether they passed the Maryland Bar Examination, a grueling, two-day test designed to assess the taker's readiness to enter the marketplace and become your lawyer. Despite a decrease in law school applications nationwide and increasing concerns that the United States has too many lawyers, most test takers — about 80 percent — passed the Maryland bar exam given in July. (Balt. Sun)

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What Poor Kids Get From Farmers’ Markets

Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to use $10,000 in private foundation grants to fund a program designed to help low-income families stretch their food stamp benefits undoubtedly will help many of those struggling to make ends meet in the wake of this month's cuts to the federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. Under the mayor's proposal, food stamp recipients will be able to get up to $10 extra a week if they use their EBT (electronic benefits transfer) cards at city farmers' markets. It doesn't make up for the $40 poor families will lose every month as a result of the cut in federal benefits, nor does it eliminate the difficulty many of them face in accessing and affording the fresh, local and healthy food available at farmers' markets. But at a time when many parents are struggling to put food on the table, every little bit helps. (Balt. Sun)

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Tim Rowland: Crime-Free Housing Law Could Be Very Unpopular Among Criminals

So Hagerstown is considering an ordinance that, as I understand it, will make it unlawful to be unlawful. But withhold your judgment, because it almost makes sense in a Hagerstown kind of way. The law in question would make it illegal for landlords to rent residential property without a Crime Free Housing License. The Crime Free Housing License would require landlords to include language in the lease “prohibiting tenants and their guests from engaging in or facilitating criminal activity,” according to accounts. Jeepers, you mean it’s really that simple? All this murder, arson, rape, destruction of property and drug trafficking can be eliminated just as easily as prohibiting pets? (Herald-Mail)

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Jenn Topper and S. Derek Turner: Something’s Happening To Local News

So far this year, 223 local TV stations have changed hands. This is the biggest wave of media consolidation ever — and it's all happening in small and mid-level markets, involving companies most people have never heard of. Leading this wave is Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. Sinclair alone is behind seven deals this year, including a $985-million deal to buy nine stations from Allbritton Communications. But it's not alone; other media companies are also racing to gobble up stations. (Balt. Sun)

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