Will: Biden’s election will end national nightmare 2.0

Moments after becoming president on Aug. 9, 1974, Gerald Ford said, “Our long national nightmare is over.” Having served a quarter-century in Congress, he understood that presidents are to “take care” that laws produced by the first branch of government are “faithfully executed.” The nation in 1974 was eager for a collegial respite from the gladiatorial strife that had consumed the country during urban disorders and the Watergate stew of scandals. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Older poll workers are afraid to work this fall. Younger Americans should step up.

With fewer than 100 days until the November election, officials are scrambling to figure out how to safely conduct an election during a public health crisis. At this point, several key issues are largely the province of government officials, such as ensuring that ballots are sent to voters in a timely manner and implementing hygiene protocols at polling locations. But ordinary Americans can address a major issue: a shortage of poll workers. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Barnes, Ebersole, Solomon & Zucker: Maryland’s child-care centers need the state’s help to survive

Child care is the workforce behind the workforce. Nearly four out of every 10 workers age 18 to 64 in Maryland have a child under the age of 18. Without a robust, safe, high-quality child-care system, families cannot return to work, and our economy will not recover. In Maryland, we’re witnessing a slow-moving disaster that will devastate our child-care community, leaving families to choose between their jobs and properly caring for their children. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Thiessen: The fight for civil rights isn’t a rejection of America’s founding. John Lewis knew that.

Perhaps the most poignant moment in this week’s commemoration of Rep. John Lewis’s life was seeing him cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge one last time in a horse-drawn caisson, while a line of Alabama state troopers stood at the other end of the bridge — this time to honor him rather than beat him. It was a testament to just how far this country had come since Bloody Sunday in 1965. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Bratton: There’s a name for the Washington football team that could end an insult and honor black heroes

In a potentially watershed moment when this nation — perhaps unwillingly — seems prepared to revisit its racial outlook, an overdue name change could play an important role. It offers a chance to not only erase a prominent symbol of white racism but also replace it with an icon of African American heroism. The football team in our nation’s capital should change its name to the Washington Red Tails. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Hooper: Baltimore teacher ‘distraught’ about kids missing more classroom time

Last week, Baltimore City Public Schools announced that it will be opening the school year virtually and delaying plans for hybrid in-person instruction. Schools CEO Sonja Santelises based this difficult decision off of the current public health conditions, in addition to feedback received from families in a variety of virtual town halls and surveys throughout the summer. This announcement echoes similar plans for reopening schools in Montgomery and Prince George’s County, in addition to many other school jurisdictions throughout the country. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Baseball took elaborate precautions for pandemic play, but the virus is already winning

Decades before the nation’s pastime was invented, Robert Burns captured the essence of the sport from far way in Scotland with his observation about how the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry. Baseball has proven this adage over and over again. Take the 1969 Mets besting the Orioles. Please. Or Bill Buckner’s fielding in the 1986 World Series. Or maybe the idiot who thought 10-cent beer night in Cleveland in 1974 was a wonderful idea. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: The child-care industry is on the brink of collapse. Congress must rescue it.

With schools shuttered and child-care options restricted, working parents across the country are shouldering unexpected child-care burdens. Many will not be able to return to work until they can find safe, affordable child care. At the same time, the child-care industry is collapsing under pandemic-inflicted financial pressure. Without swift action from Congress, child-care centers are at risk of permanent closures that could severely undermine the country’s economic recovery. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article