Venetoulis: Seven Days in February

It was a Vote that Will Live in Infamy. A vote where only a single Republican Senator showed his colleagues that courage is not dead in the United States Senate. It was a State of the Union Speech.  A speech that was less to do with the future functioning of the state of our country, then with the current malfunctioning of the state of a presidential mind. A Speech that will not be remembered for what it was about but for how it ended. 

Read Full Article

Archdiocese ‘for’ Baltimore highlighted at Center Stage event

If Ray Kelly can turn things around, so can Baltimore City. That was among the takeaways Jan. 15 at Center Stage, when the Archdiocese of Baltimore and Catholic Charities of Baltimore were host to a “Faith in Baltimore” program that highlighted the impact of Catholic institutions in the city, with Archbishop William E. Lori noting, in a play on words, that “we are the Archdiocese for Baltimore.” Kelly, vice chair of the Executive Committee at St. Peter Claver in Sandtown and lead community liaison for the Consent Decree Monitoring Team, was the inaugural recipient of the Faith in Baltimore Award. (ArchBalt)

Read Full Article

New tech tool to expose the influence of big business in politics

Everyone talks about how big business has too much influence over our political process, and sadly, many of us have witnessed it firsthand. Through meeting after meeting, I’ve watched CEOs and their lobbyists make demands to elected officials that were not in the best interest of their customers. Something was misaligned. Shouldn’t corporations be pushing political agendas that benefit their customers, the people who buy their products and keep them in business? 

The problem is that consumers haven’t had an easy way to access information about company policies and practices, so we keep supporting them, and corporations have no reason to change. What we’ve been waiting for is an easy, trackable way to vote with our dollars. 

Enter Tribe. 

Read Full Story

‘It Makes Me Feel Great’ | Marylanders Work To Give Back During Giving Tuesday

This time of year, there’s a lot to do at the Maryland Zoo. There are tons of leaves that need to be raked, and that takes a lot of people, but most of those do not work for the zoo. “We have a very small horticultural team, so they rely on volunteers to get a large amount of work done in a short amount of time,” Allison Schwartz, of the Maryland Zoo, said. Most days, Rob Starr drives a desk at Bank of America, but he said he makes a habit of giving back whenever he can. (WJZ-TV)

Read Full Article

Conference Reading: Poll: Affordable Housing Shortage Worries Montgomery Co. Voters

How big a problem is the lack of affordable housing in Montgomery County? It’s so significant that a recently-completed poll of county residents listed affordable housing as the issue they’re most concerned about other than education. The poll of 425 county residents, taken Oct. 16-Nov. 2 for the Apartment and Office Building Association of Metropolitan Washington, showed 16% of Montgomery County residents listed the scarcity of affordable housing as their No. 1 issue (29% listed education). (Md. Matters)

Read Full Article

Ransom: LifeBridge Acquisition of Bon Secours is a Win for West Baltimore

Too often, the news in west Baltimore isn’t very positive. For a part of the city that faces myriad challenges, this month marked a major win—a new partnership between Bon Secours and LifeBridge Health. Earlier this month, Bon Secours, Mercy Health, and LifeBridge Health completed LifeBridge Health’s acquisition of Bon Secours Hospital. This merger will result in improved health services and an important investment in an area of our city that is deeply in need. At the same time, Bon Secours will continue to its community works program to deliver critical services and housing in west Baltimore.

Read Full Article

Conference Reading: Education secretaries - Do what’s tough to do, what’s right in diversifying Howard County schools

Throughout history, students have often led the way for civil rights and social justice — from participating in the Freedom Rides challenging Jim Crow and demanding the desegregation of interstate buses to leading the campaign to dismantle apartheid in South Africa. Even as adults hesitate to act, students are boldly leading the way on issues from common sense gun reform to climate change. Right now, in Howard County, there is a debate on school diversity. In fact, almost three-quarters of the high school students from low-income backgrounds in Howard County attend just five of the county’s 12 high schools; just over a quarter of students are spread across the remaining seven high schools. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Conference Reading: Where Civility Is a Motto, a School Integration Fight Turns Bitter

The planned community of Columbia, southwest of Baltimore, has prided itself on its ethos of inclusion ever since it was founded more than half a century ago. Racially integrated. Affordable apartments near big homes. “The Next America” was its optimistic, harmonious motto. But a recent proposal to restore some of that idealism by balancing the number of low-income children enrolled in schools across Howard County, including those in Columbia, has led to bitter divisions. Protesters in matching T-shirts have thronged school board meetings. Thousands of letters and emails opposing the redistricting plan, some of them overtly racist, have poured in to policymakers. One high school student made a death threat against the superintendent of schools, Michael J. Martirano. (NYT)

Read Full Article