Silver Spring community activist looking at council run

Silver Spring community activist Evan Glass is considering a run for the Montgomery County Council in District 5, which would pit him against incumbent Valerie Ervin (D) of Silver Spring. Glass announced last week he would start a listening tour to learn about the concerns of residents in the district, which includes Silver Spring, Takoma Park and Burtonsville. (Gazette)

Read Full Article

Sept. 30 // Md. governor's race off to an early start

Maryland voters might not be ready, but six candidates with their eye on the governor's mansion are poised to start running in earnest — touring the state, signing up volunteers and raising millions of dollars for a spirited race. Candidates from both parties say they plan to start selling their ideas this fall, more than a year before the November 2014 general election and months earlier than past gubernatorial contests. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

When running for governor of Maryland, does a Maryland upbringing matter?

Would Maryland voters prefer a home-grown candidate for governor? Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler certainly seems to think so. As Gansler (D) formally launched his 2014 gubernatorial bid with a 17-stop announcement tour last week, he mentioned his Maryland roots most everywhere he went. “I grew up in Maryland. I’m the only candidate in the race who did,” Gansler, a former Montgomery County state’s attorney, said Saturday as his campaign rolled into Annapolis to rally a group of supporters gathered by the capital city’s harbor. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Second Maryland gun-law challenge filed in as many days

Gun rights advocates filed a second lawsuit against Maryland's new gun law Friday, calling a requirement that buyers of handguns obtain a license an "unconstitutional de facto ban" on sales. The new suit escalates an assault on the law, which is scheduled to go into effect Tuesday. The challenge was filed just hours after a federal judge set an emergency hearing for early next week in a related case against the new law's ban on the sale of assault-style rifles and high-capacity magazines. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

New law cracks down on cellphone chatting while driving

It won't matter if you're obeying every other traffic law: Starting Tuesday, if you're talking on a hand-held mobile phone while driving in Maryland, the police will have the right to pull you over and ticket you. The new law tightening the state's curb on cellphone use behind the wheel is one of hundreds that will take effect Tuesday as a result of General Assembly action this year. Among the others are high-profile measures banning the sale of some types of guns and repealing the death penalty. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Anne Arundel's Daryl Jones says he won't look back

Daryl Jones said he has put his past in the rear view and is “looking forward and pushing forward.” The County Council ousted Jones from his District 1 seat 18 months ago because he would not be living in the district while serving time for not filing his taxes. He returned to the council last week, after challenging the legality of his removal. (Capital)

Read Full Article

Kamenetz under fire for refusing to repay police retirees

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is drawing criticism for refusing to repay hundreds of police retirees who a judge found were overcharged for their health insurance. Last month, a county circuit judge gave the county 20 days to pay about $573,000 to more than 400 retired Police Department employees. The county has not done so and plans to continue to fight the order, officials said Friday. Councilwoman Vicki Almond says the county is acting as if it is "above the law." (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

O'Malley, Rawlings-Blake crime visuals both off, experts say

As Gov. Martin O'Malley and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have battled in recent weeks over crime-fighting strategies, both have come up with diagrams to illustrate their positions. O'Malley makes his argument with dueling trend lines that show crime declines leveled off as arrests dropped since his time at City Hall. Rawlings-Blake submits that arrests alone aren't the key to stopping violence, citing a chart that shows shootings and homicides at lower levels now than during O'Malley's tenure. But experts say neither politician has presented a compelling visual argument, adding that crime also follows national trends and the causes of declines are far from clear. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article