Oct. 28 // Brown picks up AFL-CIO endorsement

Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's gubernatorial campaign picked up another labor endorsement Saturday, after the Maryland and Washington branch of the AFL-CIO voted to back him. Fred Mason, president of the union, pointed to Brown's defense of collecting bargaining rights, work to boost the minimum wage and support for public schools as reasons for the endorsement. (Balt. Sun)

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Dwyer sentenced to 60 days for driving impaired, boating under influence

When state lawmakers go home for the weekend during the General Assembly session that begins in January, Del. Don Dwyer Jr. won't. He'll go to jail. The Anne Arundel County Republican was sentenced Friday to 60 days in jail, to be served on weekends, for two incidents — operating a boat under the influence in a crash in August 2012 on the Magothy River that injured himself and six others, and driving a car while impaired in August of this year after Arundel police saw him speeding and swerving on Route 100 in Pasadena. (Balt. Sun)

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Gansler running mate says other campaign 'throwing dirt'

Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's running mate said Friday she believed "it's obvious on its face" that an opponent in the Democratic race for governor is "trying to throw dirt every time we're making progress." Del. Jolene Ivey, talking on the Washington-area Kojo Nnamdi radio show, responded to questions about The Baltimore Sun's article this week about Gansler's presence at a June beach party for recent high school graduates. Teens said there was underage drinking, and Gansler acknowledged he did nothing to stop the party. (Balt. Sun)

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Gansler says he is ‘a big boy’ who can handle a rough week while running for Md. governor

Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler (D) said in a radio interview Saturday that he was willing to endure a bad week that included “character assassination” in order to become governor and help people “who have bad days every day.” Gansler, who has acknowledged he should have done more to determine whether there was underage drinking at the party, has been the subject of national media scrutiny and the butt of late-night television jokes since then. (Wash. Post)

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Change Maryland founder seeking 'common sense' fiscal policy

While the founder of Change Maryland is a very outspoken critic of the state’s Democratically controlled administration, it is not the party he has a problem with; it is the growing tax burden he sees causing residents and businesses to move elsewhere. President of the Hogan Companies and the secretary of appointments for former Gov. Bob Ehrlich, Larry Hogan describes himself as a small-business man from Annapolis who also has been involved in the community and cares very much about the state of Maryland. (Star Dem.)

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Annapolis keeps union deals quiet before meeting

Annapolis has drafted new deals with its four labor unions, but officials have declined to release the contracts or discuss specifics about them. City Council is scheduled to approve the proposed union contracts at its meeting Monday night. But the proposals won’t be available for the public to see until the same day, according to the agenda. Rhonda Wardlaw, a city spokeswoman, said she expects the drafted contracts to be available sooner for citizens. (Capital)

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Group marches for health care for all

The federal Affordable Care Act is expected to provide access to medical coverage to hundreds of thousands of Maryland's uninsured, but one group said that doesn't go far enough. The group, Healthcare is a Human Right-Maryland, led a rally Saturday in Baltimore to push for single-payer coverage similar to that in countries such as Canada and Sweden, where the government runs most of the health system and there are no insurance companies. (Balt. Sun) 

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Inside Annapolis' toughest election battle: The race for Ward 6

The symphony starts at August Woods near Truxtun Park. Landscaping crews arrive in the neighborhood just before lunch, as neighbors, mostly older and mostly white, rake leaves outside. Cleaning crews slip in and out of $400,000 homes amidst the the whir of weed trimmers in the morning air. (Capital)

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