With Baltimore’s business leaders growing impatient, mayor reveals ‘Squeegee Alternative Plan’

A group of Baltimore business leaders is calling on elected officials and the police department to do more about “squeegee kids” downtown. The move comes weeks after City Hall quietly launched a “Squeegee Alternative Plan” to attack the poverty driving the youth to clean windshields. The city released its plan Monday to offer squeegee workers support and employment after T. Rowe Price President and CEO Bill Stromberg requested a meeting with Mayor Bernard “Jack” Young, City Council President Brandon Scott and Police Commissioner Michael Harrison to discuss the “challenges presented by squeegee workers, particularly those who touch cars or drivers without permission or engage in other negative behavior." (Balt. Sun)

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Montgomery Officials Struggle With Ambitious Climate Goals

In November 2017, the Montgomery County Council declared a “Climate Change Emergency” and resolved to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the county. This past weekend, more than 300 county residents gathered in a “Climate Emergency Town Hall” to discuss and debate how the effort is going. The answer – from the activists and experts assembled – was clear: so far, unsatisfactorily. (Md. Matters)

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Baltimore mayor bars ‘unreasonable’ gag orders in city settlements; ACLU calls order ‘disingenuous’

Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young has signed an executive order retroactively barring the use of “gag orders" in some city settlements, his office announced Monday. Advocates for a ban on such restrictions called the order a misleading political maneuver meant to distract from a more effective attempt by the City Council to end the practice. The order was signed Friday and applies to people who have signed confidentiality agreements to settle claims against city employees, including police officers. The order says “unreasonable constraints” will no longer be routinely used in settling litigation, according to the city’s announcement. (Balt. Sun)

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‘I’m Not Asking For A Pass’: NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Wants To Come Home

Edward Snowden says he would like to return home but that the U.S. won’t agree to a fair trial. “I would like to return to the United States. That is the ultimate goal. But if I’m gonna spend the rest of my life in prison, the one bottom line demand that we have to agree to is that at least I get a fair trial. And that is the one thing the government has refused to guarantee because they won’t provide access to what’s called a public interest defense,” Snowden told “CBS This Morning.” (WJZ)

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Hogan to lead economic development trip to Australia

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is scheduled to lead an infrastructure and economic development mission to Australia. The governor’s office said Monday that Hogan will lead a bipartisan delegation to Sydney to promote an infrastructure initiative as chairman of the National Governors Association. The trip is scheduled to last from Sunday through Sept. 30. It will include stops in Sydney, Adelaide and Melbourne. (WTOP)

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Berlin officials fire town administrator

Berlin officials confirmed Monday the town has terminated its town administrator. Troy Purnell, a member on the Berlin Town Council confirmed Laura Allen's separation with the town, but directed all questions about the situation to Berlin Mayor Gee Williams. Williams said Allen met with the council Monday morning and was terminated at that time. He added Allen's firing was "not for any one reason, but for a multitude of reasons." (Delmarva)

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Report: State Close to Releasing Metro Funds

A drama that began in early July, when Maryland withheld more than $40 million in capital funding that was due to be provided to the Washington, D.C. area’s transit agency, is likely to be resolved in the next couple weeks. The Washington Post first reported that the state is expected to release the funds before the end of the month — in response to actions taken by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s board and its general manager, Paul J. Wiedefeld. (WTOP)

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Harris joins brief in Supreme Court case over LGBTQ discrimination

With oral arguments set to be heard next month before the Supreme Court, Congressman Andy Harris and 47 other lawmakers have signed onto a brief arguing against the inclusion of sexual orientation and gender identity under the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The question in three cases under review is whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act can be interpreted to include sexual orientation within the protections falling under the provision “because of ... sex.” An amicus brief is a filing by someone or a group of people with a strong interest in a matter before the courts but part of the litigation. In this case, Harris, R-Md.-1st, is joined by eight Republican U.S. senators and 39 Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives. (Star Dem.)

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