‘We’re Not Going To Cooperate’ | ICE Agents Won’t Have Baltimore’s Help In Arrests, Mayor Jack Young Says

Baltimore has been listed among 10 cities nationwide targeted for raids Sunday by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. President Trump confirmed reports Friday that ICE plans to arrest thousands of undocumented immigrants who have missed court dates or have been issued orders to leave the country. The sweep is expected to last for several days and like other cities on the ICE list, Baltimore has gone on record to refuse to cooperate with the arrests. (WJZ)

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Hagerstown councilwoman open to county fire tax — if city residents are treated fairly

Many Washington County volunteer fire officials say their departments are struggling to operate and need a fire tax to provide adequate coverage to the community. Jamie Drawbaugh, deputy chief of the Volunteer Fire Co. of Halfway, said last month that because volunteer fire companies receive little financial backing from the government, members are forced to raise money by hosting bingo, chicken dinners and other events. A modest countywide fire tax would ease the financial strain on local fire companies, Drawbaugh said, and give volunteers more time to share with their families, rather than spending weekends holding fundraisers. (Herald Mail)

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The Technology 202: Trump's social media summit was a spectacle. Here are the real takeaways for Big Tech.

The Trump administration’s “social media summit” was almost a microcosm of what it's like to be online in Trump's Washington these days. It was jam-packed with the kind of is-this-really-happening moments that felt like a Twitter feed come to life. Memes were created in real time: Large posters of some of President Trump’s most famous tweets were placed on stands. My colleague Philip Bump spotted a tweet about the president’s “covfefe” typo next to the bust of Abraham Lincoln. (Wash. Post)

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Should there be diaper-changing stations in men’s bathrooms? With proposed new law, D.C. wades into national debate.

Having a kid changed a lot of things — including how Jeremy León enters restaurants. Today, when he steps through the door with 3-year-old daughter Naya, Jeremy León immediately switches to “my logical mind.” He scans the scene, locates the restroom and sets out to answer the all-important question: Will there be a diaper-changing table in the men’s bathroom? More often than not in the D.C. area, the answer is no, leaving León — a stay-at-home dad who is married to a man — at a loss. (Wash. Post)

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Amnesty International: Victim Compensation Programs Should be Improved

When someone is killed or injured by gun violence, a lot of healing has to occur. Physical injuries, sure. But psychological and emotional and family and community wounds, too. “Some days are good. Some days are bad, but we go on,” a tearful Phyllis Scott said Thursday, gently encouraged by a crowd of residents and nonprofit workers dedicated to abating gun violence and its effects. The group gathered at Morgan State University to discuss a new report from Amnesty International: “Scars of Survival: Gun Violence and Barriers to Reparation in the USA.” (Md. Matters)

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‘It’s time to move forward’: Maryland lawmakers react to Trump backing down from census citizenship question

President Donald Trump said Thursday that his administration is backing down from an effort to add a question inquiring about citizenship to the 2020 U.S. census. Instead, he announced an executive order requiring federal government agencies to turn over all requested records on citizenship numbers to the Commerce Department as part of an effort to calculate the number of citizens and noncitizens. For Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Democrat from Baltimore, Thursday’s address revealed that the Trump administration’s previous assertions that its pursuit of the citizenship question was meant to help protect minority voting rights was a “sham.” (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore’s water department waits for revenue as customers wait for large bills after ransomware freezes system

Even though Baltimore’s public works department hasn’t issued water bills since a ransomware attack in May, director Rudy Chow said the agency has substantial reserves to cover its costs until it can charge customers for more than three months of service and start payments coming in again. A spokesman for the Department of Public Works also said some vehicle purchases and other discretionary expenses have been postponed as part of a “cost containment” strategy. Chow said Thursday that the agency has been able to pay its own bills on time. “Using the cash reserve is part of the normal management and financial strategy we deploy,” Chow said. (Balt. Sun)

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Elected officials weigh in on sober living home's right to operate in Frederick neighborhood

A sober living house at 439 Delaware Road in the River Crest neighborhood in Frederick sparked controversy the moment it opened its doors in late April. While some nearby residents still object to the house being there and a ruling from the city that allowed it, city officials largely supported a June 5 memo from the city advising against pursuing zoning enforcement against the property. Neighbors and the River Crest homeowners association’s board of directors argue that the home violates the exclusively residential zoning of the neighborhood. (News-Post)

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