Baltimore City Council approves property tax credit for low-income workers

The Baltimore City Council approved a $2,500 annual property tax credit Monday for low-income municipal staffers, a move they hope will make homeownership more feasible for those who are among the “hardest-working, lowest-paid employees of Baltimore.” Hundreds of janitors, clerical workers and other full-time city employees who are among the 25% lowest-paid will be eligible for the credit, should Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young sign the bill or allow it to become law without his signature. (Balt Sun)

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Teaming Up, Md. Progressive Groups Say Remaking City Hall Is Job One

Two statewide progressive organizations are set to jointly endorse a roster of City Council candidates in the upcoming Baltimore City elections. But just as significantly, the joint endorsements represent a new level of partnership between the two groups, Progressive Maryland and the Working Families Party. (Md Matters)

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Baltimore mayoral candidate Mary Miller launches major TV ad buy, focuses on accountability

Baltimore mayoral candidate and former U.S. Treasury official Mary Miller launched a major TV ad campaign Monday that focuses on her record of helping children in the city and pledges accountability in the fight against crime. The ads are part of a more than $500,000 media buy, her campaign said, and are a show of financial strength for Miller, who jumped into a crowded Democratic field late and with little name recognition. (Balt Sun)

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Prosecutors alleged tax fraud among some Baltimore Police. Now the City Council is seeking answers.

Members of the Baltimore City Council sent a letter Monday to Police Commissioner Michael Harrison asking how his department handles Internal Revenue Service inquiries about the tax withholdings of its employees, given recent concerns about fraud voiced by federal prosecutors. The letter from Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott and Councilman Kristerfer Burnett, chair of the legislative investigations committee, specifically asked about “lock-in letters,” or a form of correspondence the IRS can send to an employer instructing it to withhold taxes from an employee’s pay at a specific rate — disregarding deductions the employee may have claimed on his or her tax forms. (Balt Sun)

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Sen. Carter says progressive grassroots support could help her win April’s special congressional election

Sen. Jill Carter, D-Baltimore City, came in third place in last week’s Democratic special congressional primary but she said progressive grassroots support may be enough to put her over the top in her quest to succeed late Rep. Elijah Cummings. The special congressional general election will be held on Tuesday, April 28. The winner will serve the remainder of Cummings’ term, which expires in January 2021. (Md Reporter)

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Baltimore Lawyers Say City Isn’t Financially Responsible For Abuses of Gun Trace Task Force

Baltimore City argued before the state’s highest court that it should not have to pay victims of corrupt officers in the Gun Trace Task Force. Baltimore City says it is not financially responsible to pay victims of the rogue officers on the Gun Trace Task Force. The city is trying to save hundreds of thousands of dollars in liability from people who’ve filed lawsuits saying they were brutalized by the rogue cops. (WJZ-TV)

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What qualifies as 'meat'? Maryland bill would make restrictions in labeling

Foods made of animal tissues cultured from cells outside of the original animal, or made from plants or insects could not be labeled “meat” in Maryland under a Republican-backed bill in the Maryland General Assembly. Senate bill 188 is sponsored by Sen. Jason Gallion, R-Harford and Cecil, who called it “truth in advertising.” Eleven other GOP senators are co-sponsoring the legislation. (Delmarva)

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Maryland Comptroller Announces Prohibition On Sales Of Disposable Flavored E-Cigarettes, First In US

Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot said he’s doubling down on flavored electronic smoking devices widely popular among kids by taking a first-in-the-nation approach to prohibiting the sale of certain Electronic Smoking Devices. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration rolled out its new ban on favored cartridge-based e-cigarettes, but Franchot said the move is not enough. That’s why he said he’s going a step further by also banning disposable flavored e-cigarettes which aren’t included under the FDA ban. (WJZ-TV)

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