Inaction in Congress threatens Maryland medical marijuana

Maryland’s medical marijuana program, finally about to launch, could remain grounded if Congress fails to extend limits on federal prosecutions for using and selling the drug. Under pressure from the anti-cannabis Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the House of Representatives is balking at preserving an Obama-era provision that gives the states space to decide their own approaches to regulating the drug. (Balt. Sun)

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Judge warns Baltimore criminal justice council could shut down after Hogan reassigned funding

Baltimore’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council — which has met since 1999 — could be forced to cease operations after Gov. Larry Hogan stripped the panel of its state funding. Baltimore Circuit Judge Charles J. Peters, chairman of the body, sent a letter to the group stating that Wednesday’s meeting of the body could be its last. (Balt. Sun)

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Ben Jealous wants tuition-free college in Maryland. His plan is like Sanders’ ‘College For All’ bill

Maryland gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous wants Maryland to become the second state after New York to provide public higher education free of charge. Jealous told a group of students and progressive activists gathered Tuesday night at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, that he would help pay for the plan by ending mass incarceration. (Wash. Post)

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Democratic gubernatorial candidates stake progressive positions in Silver Spring forum

Voters who may have been looking for policy differences among Maryland’s Democratic gubernatorial candidates didn’t get many of them during a forum in Silver Spring Monday night. The two-hour forum, hosted by the Montgomery County political organization Progressive Neighbors, featured five of the seven announced candidates for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination—tech entrepreneur Alec Ross, former Obama administration official Krishanti Vignarajah, state Sen. Rich Madaleno (D-Kensington), Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker III and Baltimore attorney James Shea. (Bethesda)

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Candidates focus on business, development during latest forum leading up to city election

The candidates running for Frederick mayor and Board of Aldermen talked business — literally — Tuesday at a forum with members of the local business community. The Frederick Country Building Industry Association and Frederick County Chamber of Commerce jointly hosted the event, which featured most of the candidates set to appear on the general election ballot. (News-Post)

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Republican newcomer brings business experience, expertise to race for alderman

Republican Bryan Chaney is not only the newest candidate to enter the race for the Frederick Board of Aldermen but also the newest city resident on the ballot. The business consultant moved to Frederick on Sept. 26, 2016, just under a year before he entered the race in place of Bruce Blatchley. Blatchley filed in July but withdrew his name in September due to health reasons. The Frederick County Republican Central Committee appointed Chaney in his place. (News-Post)

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October 10 // Trump EPA to repeal power plant emissions plan, posing challenge to Maryland clean air efforts

President Donald Trump's administration said Monday it will repeal President Barack Obama’s plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, turning back what Republicans have criticized as federal overreach. “The war on coal is over,” Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt said Monday. Pruitt said he would sign a new rule to replace Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which set state-by-state goals to reduce power plant pollution. The rules aimed to cut carbon dioxide emissions across the nation by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. (Balt. Sun)

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Cummings says own brush with death making him fight harder for healthcare

For decades, Congressman Elijah Cummings has been a passionate champion for Maryland and the nation. But in May, he faced a harsh reality. A medical problem that could have cost him his life. “I had a shortness of breath and my legs swole up and I didn’t know what it was all about,” he tells WJZ. “And my sister-in-law without even seeing a note– a medical record– said you know you need to look at your heart.” And that’s exactly what it was. Cummings needed heart surgery to replace a failing aortic valve. But what’s normally a simple procedure took a terrifying turn. “What was supposed to be a three-day ordeal, ended up to be more than 100 days,” he says. (WJZ-CBS)

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