Corderman explores another option in dealing with prisoner releases

In a continuing quest to do something about the number of state prison inmates released into the local community, Del. Paul Corderman said he is exploring another option. Corderman, R-Washington, said he will again introduce a bill next year requiring the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services to take inmates back to where they lived when they were convicted. But another avenue, that Corderman said might be more realistic, are opportunities for inmates nearing the end of their sentences to finish that time at the detention center in their home community. (Herald-Mail)

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Republican Whose Posts Led To Trump Ire To Run For Cummings’ Seat

The Maryland Republican whose social media posts about trash in Baltimore ultimately led to President Donald Trump’s verbal attack of the late Rep. Elijah Cummings says she’ll run for Cummings’ seat. Kimberly Klacik said she’ll file next week as a candidate for the 7th Congressional District special election. Cummings died last month. Primaries will be in February, with an April general election. Klacik’s videos of West Baltimore — within the 7th District — ultimately caught the attention of Trump last summer, who blasted Cummings’ district as a “rodent-infested mess.” That set off a war of words with Baltimore boosters. (WJZ)

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Trump Says Transcript Of 2nd Call With Ukraine President To Be Released Soon

President Donald Trump told reporters on Saturday morning to expect a transcript of his second phone call with Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelenskiy to be released next week. "Now they want to have a transcript of the other call, the second call, and I'm willing to provide that," Trump said, likely speaking of an April phone call just after Zelenskiy took office. "We’ll probably give it to you on Tuesday." (WBAL)

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Judge: Hogan administration violated labor laws against largest state union

A state judge has issued a proposed decision that may result in Gov. Larry Hogan’s administration and the largest state employee union returning to the negotiating table after a year-long impasse. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Hogan Administration have been feuding over wage negotiations that never got off the ground in fall 2018. Each side filed charges of unfair labor practices against the other. (Balt. Sun)

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Larry Hogan is using an old playbook to attack a plan to transform Maryland schools. What does he hope to gain?

Five years ago, a little-known Republican named Larry Hogan swept into governor’s mansion thanks in part to a strategy that ― depending on one’s point of view ― was either clever or cunning. Rallying his 275,000 “Change Maryland" followers on Facebook, Hogan rebranded a fee to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay as the “rain tax.” The fee was charged on pavement, not rain, but the name was catchy and it stuck. (Balt. Sun)

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Montgomery County Passes Bill Banning Hairstyle Discrimination

The Montgomery County Council has unanimously passed legislation that would update the county’s anti-discrimination law to prohibit discrimination based on certain hairstyles. The Montgomery County Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair (CROWN) Act makes it illegal to discriminate against a person with a “protective hairstyle,” which the legislation describes as “those hairstyles necessitated by, or resulting from, the immutable characteristics of a hair texture associated with race.” (WJZ-TV)

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Gov. Hogan Announces $6.4 Million Federal Grant To Combat Opioid Epidemic

More than $6 million in federal grant money is coming to Maryland to help fight the opioid epidemic. Gov. Hogan says the money will support a coordinated, statewide response to the crisis. More than 1,000 people have died from an opioid overdose in Maryland during the first six months of 2019 alone. (WJZ-TV)

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Md. Correctional Enterprises failed to investigate $1M in missing inventory

Maryland Correctional Enterprises officials failed to properly investigate more than $1 million in discrepancies involving missing inventory and instead adjusted inventory records to reflect what was on hand, according to an audit released by the Office of Legislative Audits. The audit found that the agency “did not always investigate and resolve variances between its materials and supplies inventory records and the amounts on hand. Rather, MCE adjusted the inventory records to reflect the amounts on hand without any investigation or supervisory review and approval.” (Daily Record)

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