Montgomery County to send cash to businesses, hospitals coping with coronavirus

Montgomery County is offering up $20 million in grants for businesses affected by the coronavirus outbreak, and sending another $10 million to local hospitals as they deal with a surge in patients. The County Council unanimously passed a series of measures designed to respond to the pandemic Tuesday, following D.C.’s lead in opting to offer cash assistance for companies struggling to stay afloat. (Wash Journal)

Read Full Article

Marylanders ordered to stay at home by Gov. Larry Hogan during coronavirus threat

In a "critical turning point" in the coronavirus outbreak, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has issued a stay-at-home order effective 8 p.m. Monday, March 30. Residents should not leave their homes unless for an essential job or activity, including getting food and medicine or attending medical appointments. "This is a deadly public health crisis. We are no longer asking or suggesting that Marylanders stay home — we are directing them to do so," Hogan said. (Delmarva)

Read Full Article

FDA authorizes widespread use of unproven drugs to treat coronavirus

The Food and Drug Administration has given emergency approval to a Trump administration plan to distribute millions of doses of anti-malarial drugs to hospitals across the country, saying it is worth the risk of trying unproven treatments to slow the progression of the disease caused by the novel coronavirus in seriously ill patients. There have been only a few, small anecdotal studies showing a possible benefit of the drugs, hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, to relieve the acute respiratory symptoms of covid-19 and clear the virus from infected patients. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Hopkins Allies Put Out the Call for Respirators

Several Baltimore business and political leaders are circulating a private call from officials at Johns Hopkins Medical Center for respirators that aren’t used exclusively for medical purposes. These officials believe that several companies — and even a few individuals — may be in possession of Powered Air Purifying Respirators (PAPR) that Hopkins has purchased through the years for its medical personnel, but are also used in manufacturing and other industrial operations. (Md. Matters)

Read Full Article

Baltimore Clean Air Act is invalidated by federal judge

A federal judge has struck down Baltimore’s Clean Air Act, finding the ordinance is preempted by state environmental law. The BCAA, signed into law in March 2019, imposed emissions standards that were intentionally more stringent than state and federal laws. Incinerator operators Wheelabrator Baltimore L.P. and Curtis Bay Energy L.P., as well as a trash removal company and two trade associations, filed suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in April 2019, arguing the ordinance is illegal and was preempted by state and federal law. (Daily Record)

Read Full Article

Lawmakers push for racial breakdown in Maryland’s public coronavirus data, seek to spot disparities early

Every morning at 10 a.m., the Maryland health department publishes an update to its sobering data about the rapidly spreading coronavirus. The latest state data showed the number of cases among people ages 10 to 19 more than doubled over three days. It documented how the number of cases among women in Maryland surpassed those among men. And it registered cases as they’ve sprung up in county after county after county. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

Gov. Hogan on the coronavirus: ‘In two weeks around Easter, we are going to be looking more like New York’

Maryland will likely continue to see a rapid increase in COVID-19 cases through Easter, Gov. Larry Hogan said Sunday, indicating social distancing measures will likely remain in place through next month. “In two weeks around Easter, we are going to be looking more like New York,” Hogan said in an interview with Fox News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace. “It’s continuing to grow at really frightening paces, and we think it’s going to be worse in two weeks, not better.” (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

'Technical challenges’: Maryland officials struggle to comply with open meetings law amid coronavirus restrictions

As the Maryland State Board of Education began its much-anticipated March meeting, it was clear there was a problem: People couldn’t hear. Teachers and parents were tuning in from across the state, eager to glean information about school closures amid the state’s sweeping measures to contain the coronavirus. But the audio stream was patchy for some, unworkable for others. As complaints poured in, board members called a halt to the meeting. They consulted an attorney, who said they couldn’t hold the meeting if it wasn’t public. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article