Wrongfully-Convicted Md. Man Receiving Compensation: It’s Not About The Money

Five men wrongfully convicted of crimes in Maryland are receiving compensation from the state, almost $79,000 for each year they served in prison, totaling $9 million. Walter Lomax, who served 38 years for a murder he didn’t commit, will receive $3 million, the largest payout in state history. Lomax was locked up in the Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup, for a 1967 murder and robbery case. He was 20 years old when he went in. (WJZ-TV)

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$8 million for injured cadet among city’s largest settlements

In possibly the largest settlement of its kind in Baltimore, the city will pay $8 million to a cadet who was accidentally shot in the head by a police officer during a 2013 training exercise. Raymond Gray, a University of Maryland police recruit, was left with severe brain damage and other serious injuries, including the loss of an eye. (Brew)

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Ocean City Officials Continue Youth Sports Market Talks

Part of redefining Ocean City’s brand is aggressively going after the growing youth sports market, an issue that arose again during this week’s strategic planning sessions. Throughout the day on Tuesday and much of Wednesday, the Mayor and Council along with department heads and other key staff worked on an update to the town’s strategic plan last revised two years ago. The discussion turned toward an aggressive plan to go after the ever-growing youth sports market, a growing multi-billion-dollar industry. (Dispatch)

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Court weighs Trump claim that ex-White House counsel McGahn, top aides are absolutely immune from congressional subpoena

Lawyers for two former high-level Trump administration officials were in court Thursday in legal battles that center on whether they will testify in the House impeachment inquiry and test the limits of the administration’s claims that presidential advisers are “absolutely immune” from congressional subpoena. (Wash. Post)

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Unions: State Workforce Shortages Leading to Dangerous Conditions

The shortage of 2,000 state employees in critical places like prisons and psychiatric hospitals is leading to unmanageable workloads and dangerous working conditions, members of the state’s largest employee union told lawmakers on Tuesday. Jeremy Jeffers, a resident adviser at the Victor Cullen Center, a youth detention facility in Frederick County, said employees are drafted to work 16-hour shifts multiple times a week. On days when there isn’t enough staff to fully cover positions, Cullen Center residents don’t get classroom time and instead have school lessons dropped off without instruction. At the facility, Jeffers said he’s been assaulted multiple times, resulting in a partially amputated finger, several concussions, torn ligaments and a fractured ankle. (Md. Matters)

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Why minority representation in medical research is a matter of life and death

U.S. racial and ethnic diversity is ever increasing, but the medical representation of minority groups is not. A recent review of government-funded cancer research studies found that participants were disproportionately white, and fewer than 2 percent of these clinical trials focused on minorities specifically. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports on the problem and efforts to correct it. (PBS)

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Baltimore leaders seek to revisit tax deal with major institutions because of looming costs, including Kirwan

Elected leaders in Baltimore want to revisit — and potentially renegotiate — a long-term, multimillion-dollar deal under which major nonprofit institutions make annual payments to the city in lieu of taxes, arguing that looming budget woes from state school reform mandates and other big-ticket expenses will necessitate increased revenues in coming years. City Councilman Eric Costello, chair of the council’s budget committee, said he will introduce a resolution Monday calling on signatories to the 2016 memorandum of understanding — including the city’s medical and educational anchor institutions — to brief the council on the deal’s “efficacy” and on “options for reopening and renegotiating” its terms. (Balt. Sun)

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Community Groups Propose Changes to Racial Equity Bill

Concerns over Montgomery County’s proposed racial equity bill have led to proposed changes from residents and advocacy groups at two public hearings on Tuesday. Council President Nancy Navarro, who introduced the bill in September, has repeatedly emphasized that changes will be considered in committee work sessions as the bill moves through the legislative process. But that didn’t stop more than two dozen residents from sharing their thoughts on specific portions of the legislation, from the number of seats on a proposed advisory committee to the difficulties of ending racial bias through new laws. (Bethesda)

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