July 6 // Down to the wire: Ballots being counted this week will decide Maryland races

The June 26 primary results have been long determined for most Maryland races, but it’s still undecided in several close contests in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. The Democratic nomination for the Montgomery county executive is coming down to absentee and provisional ballots, with two men — a wealthy businessman and a longtime progressive politician — locked in a close battle. In Prince George’s County, all eyes are on two County Council races. (Wash. Post)

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Results in Democratic Baltimore County executive race not expected until at least Friday

More than a week after the Democratic primary election for Baltimore County executive, there is still no winner — but officials say there could be a victor by Friday evening. The last votes in the contest to be counted — about 1,300 provisional ballots cast by Democrats and 900 absentee ballots from both parties — are to be tallied Friday. The three-candidate race hangs in the balance. (Balt. Sun)

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As provisional ballots are counted, Elrich lead narrows in MoCo executive race

The slow, methodical process of counting ballots resumed Thursday in Gaithersburg, where the race for Montgomery County executive and another contest remain too close to call. More than 7,000 votes, divided almost evenly between provisional and absentee ballots, will decide who wins the Democratic primary in the race for executive. Currently, Councilmember Marc B. Elrich leads businessman David T. Blair by 149 votes, down considerably from the nearly 500-vote edge the lawmaker enjoyed on election night. (Md. Matters)

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Leaders in 2018 Harford races remain there after provisional ballot canvass Thurs.

Incumbent Harford County Del. Susan McComas still had a lead of 61 votes over Walter “Butch” Tilley in the Republican primary race to represent Legislative District 34B in Annapolis following Thursday’s count of more than 200 provisional ballots. Candidates, McComas among them, who were in the lead after primary election day on June 26 and stayed there after the first canvass of absentee ballots June 28, remained there after the provisional canvass Thursday. (Aegis)

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After provisional ballot count, Howard council race gets even tighter

A day before last week’s primary election results are scheduled to be certified, four votes separate the two Democratic candidates in the District 1 Howard County Council race. Jon Weinstein, the incumbent in the district that includes Ellicott City, has 3,167 votes and challenger Liz Walsh, a newcomer to county politics, has 3,163 after Thursday’s count of provisional ballots. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Boardman: Harford Sheriff Gahler tried to recruit Baltimore County Executive Kamenetz to help I.C.E.

Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey R. Gahler tried to recruit the late Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to participate in Gahler’s effort to round up immigrants for deportation back to their countries of origin, according to a letter obtained that Sheriff Gahler wrote in November 2016, shortly after the election of Donald Trump. Gahler was quick to point out that the program was initiated under President Barack Obama, adding that the program is one that “crosses old and tiresome political lines.” (Dagger)

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District 33 candidate's brother taken to hospital after seven-hour standoff with police

A Maryland delegate candidate’s brother has been transported to a hospital and charged with assault after a seven-hour standoff with police last Friday morning, according to a county police report. Jason Freeman Bagnall, 48, was taken into Anne Arundel County police custody and transferred to a hospital for evaluation after he threatened his sister, Heather Bagnall-Tudball, with a shotgun and ranted about conspiracies and mass shootings, according to a police report. (Capital)

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July 5 // Maryland pioneers state regulation of online political advertising

 

At least one tech giant has stopped accepting state and local political ads in Maryland as a result of a new state law that regulates such online material. A representative from Google said the company made its decision before the law — one of the first of its kind in the country — took effect July 1. “Starting June 29th, we will stop accepting state and local election ads in Maryland, while we assess the new election ads disclosure law and ensure our systems are built to comply with its new requirements,” Riva Sciuto, a spokeswoman for Google, said in an email. (Wash. Post)

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