House leaders look to expedite $2.2 trillion relief package but face possibility that one GOP lawmaker may delay passage

Facing one of the worst economic downturns in U.S. history, House leaders expressed optimism Thursday about swift passage of the emergency $2.2 trillion relief bill aimed at mitigating the financial havoc caused by the coronavirus pandemic but faced a possible procedural hurdle that could delay sending the measure to President Trump. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) vowed to bring the massive legislation to the House floor on Friday and said she felt certain “we will have a strong bipartisan vote.” (Wash Post)

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Political Notes: Local, state leaders laud Gov. Hogan's response to coronavirus

As many aspects of Marylanders’ lives have been affected by the coronavirus outbreak the past few weeks, state and local leaders from both sides of the aisle praised Gov. Larry Hogan’s and other state officials’ actions to keep the state’s residents safe. Del. Jesse Pippy (R-Frederick and Carroll), chair of the Frederick County delegation in Annapolis, said he’s spent much time since the General Assembly adjourned providing guidance to small-business owners and constituents about the impact of the coronavirus on state and local governments. (News-Post)

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Maryland’s Response To Coronavirus Pandemic Is Third Most Aggressive, Study Says

Maryland’s response to the coronavirus is ahead of the curve, according to a recent study. A new study from WalletHub finds Maryland’s response is the third most aggressive of any state behind only Rhode Island and California. The study looked at each state’s responses to the pandemic, ranging from school closures to shelter in place rules. (WJZ)

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Senate passes $2 trillion bill to blunt coronavirus pandemic’s economic impact, as households and businesses gasp for relief

Facing one of the worst economic downturns in American history, one that is unsparing in its trauma, the Senate late Wednesday unanimously approved a $2 trillion emergency relief bill that attempts to arrest the financial havoc caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Lawmakers acted with unusual speed and cooperation to produce the largest economic rescue package in U.S. history. (Wash Post)

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Baltimore aerial surveillance agreement: $3.7 million price tag, privacy protections, evaluation plan

Private donors are expected to put up nearly $3.7 million to fund a controversial plan to fly three private surveillance planes over Baltimore, according to a document obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The previously undisclosed agreement between the Baltimore Police Department and Ohio-based Persistent Surveillance Systems details how the pilot aerial surveillance program will be funded, what privacy protections will be instituted and how it will be evaluated. (Balt Sun)

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A county executive reaches out — at a distance — in the era of coronavirus

Prince George’s County Executive Angela D. Alsobrooks was working at home Friday night when her personal telephone rang. A neighbor was calling, and he sounded distressed. “He said, ‘Oh, Miss Alsobrooks, I can’t breathe,’ ” she recalled. “He thought he might be infected, and he was frightened. I was able to get an ambulance for him, and the next day he called back to say he was okay. He was just afraid.” (Wash Post)

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The $2 trillion relief bill is massive but it won’t prevent a recession

The Senate just passed a $2.2 trillion relief package for the economy -- the biggest in U.S. history -- by an unanimous vote. The House is expected to approve it soon and President Trump is eager to sign it. The good news is the majority of the money is going to laid-off workers, small business owners, hospitals and state and local governments. The bad news is it won’t be enough to stop a recession. And it’s an open question whether the nation can avoid an economic depression, the likes of which haven’t been seen since the 1930s. (Wash Post)

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How the Planning Commission plans to meet in the age of coronavirus

The city of Baltimore has cut back a number of services and meetings due to the coronavirus outbreak, but one agency has decided to move ahead with a previously scheduled session. Baltimore’s Planning Commission plans to carry on with a public hearing scheduled for tomorrow, March 26. (Balt Brew)

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