Maryland can manufacturer says tariffs have hurt its bottom line

Steel tariffs have cost a Maryland manufacturer millions of dollars and forced it to cut dozens of jobs, the company’s CEO said. Independent Can Company says the tariffs cost it $1 million last year and, along with lost business, will account for another $2 million hit this year. The Trump administration last year imposed tariffs of 25% on steel imported from foreign countries, steel that is essential to the Belcamp-company’s finished products. “The industry is hurting by this,” said Rick Huether, Independent Can’s president and CEO. “There’s work that I’m blessed that we are picking up new stuff from other people. If it weren’t for that it wouldn’t be good.” (Daily Record)

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Maryland poised to see positive job growth as automation takes over

There has been plenty of national worry about robots or computers taking over jobs that used to be held by human workers, as automated technology has made its way into industries like manufacturing. Maryland and the Washington, D.C.-Maryland-Virginia (DMV) region at large is in good shape to weather the wave of automation expected to pervade the U.S. workforce in the coming decade. Maryland may experience about 681,000 job displacements due to increased automation, equivalent to a rate of about 21.5%, by 2030, according to a new report from research and consulting firm McKinsey & Co. That is below the national anticipated displacement rate of 23%.

GBC opens nominations for Bridging the Gap Achievement Awards

The Greater Baltimore Committee (GBC) has opened the nomination period for its annual Bridging the Gap Achievement Awards, which recognize minority and women-owned businesses in the Baltimore region. In addition, the GBC has created three new award categories — Diversity in Leadership, Community Impact and Mentorship — to recognize the important contributions such enterprises are making to the communities and regional and state economy, and to acknowledge majority companies who support their success.  Three existing award categories, Successful Women or Minority-owned Business, Innovative Partnership or Strategic Alliance, and President’s Award, will continue in 2019. (Daily Record) 

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Giant Food president tapped to lead Stop & Shop supermarket chain

Ahold Delhaize USA, the Dutch parent company of Stop & Shop, is tapping Giant Food President Gordon Reid as the new president of the Quincy, Massachusetts-based supermarket chain. Landover-based Giant Food is another U.S. supermarket chain owned by Ahold Delhaize. Reid will start as the new Stop & Shop president in late July. Ira Kress, Giant's senior vice president of operations, is taking over as interim president. Mark McGowan, the current president of Stop & Shop, “has made the decision to leave the organization,” Ahold Delhaize said in a release. He will stay at Stop & Shop in an advisory role through the end of the year at the company’s request, the company said. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Second appeal filed in Maryland Insurance Administration lease dispute

A second appeal has been filed with the state by the owners of Montgomery Park over a lease dispute with the Maryland Insurance Administration. The controversy erupted this spring after the state agency reversed course in April on a plan to move its 250 employees to southwest Baltimore and instead remained in offices at St. Paul Plaza downtown. The move has led to finger-pointing and bitter charges of pitting one portion of the city against the other for office leasing. The first appeal was filed in May with the state Department of General Services (DGS) by Montgomery Park co-owners David Tufaro and Samuel K. Himmelrich Jr. — and was denied, said Nick Cavey, a DGS spokesman. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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How a national designation could change Charles County tourism, economy

A historic Maryland ship graveyard could become one of the latest tourism hubs. A 18-square-mile stretch along the Potomac River in Charles County, which features more than 100 decaying World War I steamships, was designated a marine sanctuary by NOAA on July 8. The designation is part of continuing efforts to preserve, research and monitor marine resources nationwide. NOAA, which currently oversees 13 marine sanctuaries enveloping more than 600,000 square miles, will partner with the state of Maryland and Charles County to manage the Mallows Bay-Potomac River National Marine Sanctuary, approximately 40 miles south of Washington. (Daily Record)

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Judge rules against Oracle in $10 billion military cloud computing dispute

A federal judge has ruled against Oracle’s motion to block the Pentagon’s 10-year, $10 billion cloud computing contract, siding with the Defense Department and Amazon Web Services in a contentious eight-month-long legal battle. The Friday decision in the Court of Federal Claims should clear the way for the Pentagon to award the long-awaited contract to either Amazon or Microsoft, the two companies it says are eligible. It is the third time a bid protest has failed to quash the award; earlier attempts by Oracle and IBM were respectively denied and dismissed. (Wash. Post)

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FTC votes to approve $5 billion settlement with Facebook in privacy probe

The Federal Trade Commission voted this week to approve a roughly $5 billion settlement with Facebook that could end an investigation into its privacy practices, according to a person familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak on the record, a deal poised to result in unprecedented new government oversight of the company. The settlement -- adopted along party lines, with the FTC’s three Republicans supporting it and two Democrats against it -- puts in motion an end to a wide-ranging probe into Facebook’s mishandling of users’ personal information that began more than a year ago. (Wash. Post)

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