Port operations resume as workers temporarily end strike

The three-day strike that paralyzed the port of Baltimore is over — for now. Striking longshoremen agreed late Friday to resume working on the docks during a 90-day "cooling-off period" while negotiations continue on a new local contract. Work on some ships had resumed earlier in the day after an arbitrator ordered them back on the job to load and unload container ships. Now that the union has voluntarily agreed to suspend the strike, its members also will resume work on the auto carriers so critical to the port, which has become the nation's No. 1 vehicle handler. (Balt. Sun)

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Oct. 21 // Uncertainty of future shutdown could dampen holiday spending

Though the federal government shutdown ended last week, the economic impact is likely to be felt in Maryland for months, dimming prospects for a robust holiday shopping season. With Congress funding the government only through Jan. 15 — raising the specter of another shutdown — some federal workers in Maryland plan to limit their holiday spending. Stores are bracing for more frugal customers. And financial experts are urging federal workers to start saving immediately. (Balt. Sun)

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2,393 Marylanders buy health insurance on state exchange

Almost 2,400 Marylanders have bought insurance in the first 17 days that the state's new health care exchange has been open, according to new data released by the Maryland Health Connection. The exchange had a bumpy start, with users experiencing delays and technical troubles. And while officials say the troubles are still being addressed, they say the number of people using the site has ramped up. The total number of enrollees has doubled in the last week. (Balt. Sun)

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GAO questions disparities in nuclear plant oversight

A new government report raises questions about the consistency of federal nuclear power plant oversight, noting regional disparities in the frequency with which plants - including Maryland's Calvert Cliffs - have been cited for safety problems or violations. The review released last week by the Government Accountability Office, an investigative arm of Congress, found significant differences across the country in how often the Nuclear Regulatory Commission reported finding low-risk safety problems and low-level violations at the nation's 62 operating nuclear plants. (Balt. Sun)

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PSC Orders BGE To Reach Out To "Non-Responsive" Customers

BGE will have to do a better job in reaching out to customers who haven't said if they wanted to opt out of the Smart Meter Program. The utility wanted to automatically label 470,000 customers as having opted out, but the PSC rejected that request, in an opinion released Thursday night. The commission ordered the company not to cut off service of any of these non-responsive customers. (WBAL)

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5 Questions for Michael D. Hankin, CEO of Brown Advisory

Brown Advisory in Fells Point turned 20 this year. The firm now manages about $42 billion in assets and recently expanded its business in the United Kingdom. CEO Michael Hankin reflected on the firm's founding and its growth, as well as his efforts to clean up the Inner Harbor waters. (Balt. Sun)

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1 E. Pratt goes on the market

Griffith Properties LLC has put the PNC Bank building at 1 E. Pratt St. on the market, making it the third large office building downtown to go up for sale this year. J. Brad Griffith, the principal of Boston-based Griffith Properties, said he decided the time was right to sell the property after investing $15 million in it over the past seven years. Griffith purchased the property from Verizon, which had been the major tenant in the 355,779-square-foot building until it consolidated operations in other area buildings in 2009. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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LifeBridge partners with urgent care company

Read more: LifeBridge partners with urgent care company