National Folk Festival gave boost to local business

The National Folk Festival was responsible for driving customers to local businesses this month, including a large bar crowd to The Brick Room, much to the delight of owner Alex Scott. Scott and other downtown Salisbury business owners reported strong sales during the festival weekend, but the Friday and Saturday rush slowed down on Sunday, when a steady rain kept the attendance numbers low. (Daily Times)

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Baked in Baltimore to open in former Goldman's Kosher Bakery site

A bakery business with Washington roots has acquired the former Goldman’s Kosher Bakery site in Northwest Baltimore. Baked in Baltimore will open Saturday at 6848 Reisterstown Road, where the 52-year-old, family-owned Goldman’s had operated since 1973 before closing in January. The new business, a black- and woman-owned retail and wholesale bakery, was co-founded by attorney and entrepreneur April N. Richardson, who grew up in Baltimore and also operates DC Sweet Potato Cakes. (Balt. Sun)

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September 19 // Greater Baltimore GDP grows slower than U.S. average for metro areas in 2017

Greater Baltimore's gross domestic product rose slower than the average for U.S. metropolitan areas in 2017, hampered by a decline in the transportation and construction sectors. The area's GDP increased 1 percent last year, compared with a 2.1 percent average across the country's 383 metros, according to data released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis on Tuesday. By comparison, the Baltimore-area GDP increased 2.6 percent in 2016. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Locust Point neighbors try to draw line at next 'looming' building, but project moves forward

There was Tide Point and Silo Point. Then McHenry Row and Anthem House. And Anthem House 2 and others. The neighbors who live in traditional rowhouses in Locust Point, a tight-knit neighborhood in South Baltimore, say they’ve seen a lot of development in the last 15 years or so and welcomed much of it despite more traffic and other inconveniences. But the proposed nine-story building with retail, offices and apartments on Key Highway between Woodall and Stevenson streets would be about four times the height of the homes surrounding it. It was just too much, prompting a not-in-my-backyard push by residents who said this is the first full-scale revolt against a developer that anyone could remember. (Balt. Sun)

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Md. firms struggle to find workers, but remain optimistic in Q2 business climate survey

Baltimore-area firms are increasingly optimistic about Maryland's business climate, even as executives at those companies note a skilled worker shortage, a quarterly sales dip and negative impacts from state taxes. The results come from the recently-revived Maryland Business Climate Survey, which looked at responses from senior executives at 250 Maryland businesses during the second quarter of 2018. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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China tariffs could hurt Under Armour short term, analyst says

Under Armour could be hurt short-term by the Trump administration’s latest round of tariffs on Chinese goods, one analyst said Tuesday. But the 10 percent duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports likely won’t have a long-term effect, said Camilla Yanushevsky, an equity analyst with CFRA Research in Rockville. About 20 percent of items singled out by the tariffs announced Monday fall in the textiles, apparel and luxury goods industry, according to a CFRA analysis. (Balt. Sun)

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Tech Center to hold open house for business community in partnership with chamber

While each year in October the Carroll County Career and Technology Center opens its doors to potential students, this year, the Tech Center will bring in members of the business community on Thursday night, Sept. 20 at its first-ever open house, in partnership with the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce. Tech Center Principal Bill Eckles said the idea is for local businesses and community members in the industry to see the school’s program offerings, and see what connections can be made. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Barnes & Noble brings new concept to Columbia — sans the bar and restaurant

Barnes & Noble is bringing it back to the basics with its latest store, opening Wednesday at the Mall in Columbia. The shop, opening in 17,000 square feet that used to belong to the Sears department store, will be the sixth to launch under a new concept unveiled by the bookseller in 2016. Like the other new locations, it will feature a sleek, contemporary design and plenty of communal seating. What it won't have is a Barnes & Noble Kitchen, the in-store restaurant and bar that was envisioned as a way of luring customers in and encouraging them to stay. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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