As 737 Max woes continue, Boeing loses $6 billion aircraft deal

Boeing's campaign to restore the reputation of its best-selling plane after two deadly crashes suffered a blow with a Saudi airline canceling an order worth up to $5.9 billion in favor of a European rival of the U.S. manufacturer. Flyadeal, the budget airline arm of Saudi Arabian Airlines Corp., ordered 30 A320neo jets from Airbus and took options on 20 more, meaning that its entire fleet will consist of planes from that company. It's a potentially troubling sign for Boeing, which has not seen customers divert orders to Airbus en masse. (Chi. Tribune)

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Experts warn of 'dead zone' in Chesapeake Bay from pollution

When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and pollute the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary. The old hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River is still ably producing power, but its days of effectively trapping sediment in a 14-mile-long reservoir behind its walls are over. Behind the 94-foot-high barrier lies a massive inventory of coal-black muck — some 200 million tons of pollutants picked up over decades from farmlands, industrial zones and towns. (Balt. Sun)

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If the Maryland blue crab population is on the rise, why are the prices increasing?

This time last year, nearly a third of the Chesapeake Bay's adult blue crab population was killed.  This year, it seems the resilient crustaceans have bounced back. However, the price of crabs hasn't gone down, as the law of supply and demand would seem to dictate.  According to a report from the Chesapeake Bay Stock Assessment Committee, the blue crab population has seen a near 60 percent increase. The overall population sits at 594 million compared to 372 million in 2018.  Last year, the population suffered casualties from colder water temperatures. And while the population may be on the rise, the increase in juvenile populations and continued harvesting has led to smaller crabs for some local purveyors. (York Daily Record) 

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Shore Health enhancing patient care with telemedicine

The Eastern Shore is bound by the Chesapeake Bay to the west, separated from the urban hubs of Baltimore and Washington, D.C. For the University of Maryland Medical System and UM Shore Regional Health, bridging the Chesapeake Bay is a priority, especially for critically ill patients who need access to medical specialists. UM Shore Regional Health has developed ways to bring treatments to many Shore patients without forcing them to make the trip to downtown Baltimore for specialized care. (Star Democrat)

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New law requires Maryland pension system to disclose millions in fees paid to Wall Street firms

A new Maryland law requires greater transparency in disclosing millions of dollars in fees paid by the state’s pension system to Wall Street investment firms. The Maryland State Retirement and Pension System has reported paying about $370 million annually in fees to the firms that invest its $51 billion in assets. But the real amount of fees paid is anywhere from $460 million to $570 million. That’s because so-called “carried interest fees” — a cut of the Maryland fund’s profits that goes to the outside investment managers — have not been not disclosed publicly. (Balt. Sun)

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Under Armour, Sagamore ask federal judge to dismiss shareholders' lawsuit over Port Covington dealings

Attorneys representing Under Armour Inc., its board of directors and Sagamore Development are asking the U.S. District Court in Baltimore to dismiss a lawsuit brought by shareholders regarding the planned redevelopment of Port Covington. Two shareholders filed separate federal lawsuits last year claiming Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank used his position to benefit himself in pursuing the Port Covington project being developed by a team including Sagamore, Plank's private real estate arm. The cases were consolidated and two internal investigations conducted by a committee of Under Armour's board found no wrongdoing. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Baltimore hospitals provide $2 million to help curb homelessness

Ten local hospitals will provide a combined $2 million to help Baltimore City pay for a pilot program that will use Medicaid money to provide housing for homeless individuals and families. Under the program, the state acts as a broker to provide the city and other jurisdictions with federal Medicaid money. Maryland received a waiver that allows Medicaid funding to be used for case management after someone has been placed into a public housing unit. Local jurisdictions have to apply for slots and pay a 50 percent match. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Aramark workers at Washington Convention Center threaten strike

The union that represents Aramark (NYSE: ARMK) employees at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center may strike as early as this week after a breakdown of negotiations with the Philadelphia-based food service company. Unite Here Local 23, which negotiates for about 300 food and beverage service workers employed at the convention center, voted June 24 to authorize a strike, though union officials have not actually called for the strike yet. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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