Snag and a slew of others raise fresh rounds. Here's the latest money roundup from across the region.

Arlington-based hourly-staffing platform Snag raised an additional $10 million to support its growth initiatives, according to the company. The new unannounced funding round follows an $18 million raise in 2018, while in October, it eliminated about 60 positions across the company. It is also one of the many companies and organizations that have raised fresh funding recently that we frankly haven't had time to write about. And after a record-breaking year for venture capital funding (not including private equity) that saw more than $2 billion go to local startups, it seems the pace hasn't slowed down. (Wash. Bus. Journal)

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Maryland-based mobile bar serves drinks out of a vintage trailer

As a brand manager for craft breweries and wineries, Brooke Mihoces has spent a good chunk of her career packing and unpacking alcohol destined for festivals and other events. Eventually, she wondered: why not put it all into a mobile bar? What started out as a time-saving measure has morphed into a side hustle for Mihoces, a resident of Severna Park in Anne Arundel County. Six months ago, she launched Vintage Views, a bar service run out of a 1964 Shasta camper (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Larry Hogan presses Trump administration for visas for crab pickers

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Thursday pressed Trump administration officials to grant more work visas to immigrants, arguing seasonal laborers are a pillar of the Chesapeake Bay’s seafood industry. Hogan, a moderate Republican weighing a 2020 primary challenge to President Trump, wrote to Cabinet secretaries that continuing to cap the seasonal visas that have been used by hundreds of migrant crab pickers for decades “could permanently damage Maryland’s seafood industry, causing . . . iconic family businesses to close and having a devastating impact on jobs in our state.” (Wash. Post)

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Under Armour wins accreditation for labor practices around the world

Under Armour secured a stamp of approval from The Fair Labor Association for labor practices covering factory workers around the globe. The labor group, which monitors worker conditions, accredited the Baltimore sports apparel maker’s social compliance program after finding it includes strong policies for monitoring and fixing problems affecting workers in the supply chain. The multi-year examination and accreditation represents a key milestone in the company’s long-term effort to improve factory worker conditions, said Sharon Waxman, the labor group’s president and CEO. (Balt. Sun)

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LifeBridge, CareFirst to host Shark Tank-style competition for health startups

LifeBridge Health and CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield are partnering to host a Shark Tank-style challenge for health startups, offering a grand prize of up to $50,000. The four-hospital health care system and the state's largest health insurer are looking to fund young, digital-oriented startups working on technologies to address challenges facing the health care industry. Such startups can apply to compete in the pitch challenge, and the chance to win a minimum of $20,000 in new funding. Winners would also get a one-year membership in the LifeBridge Startup Affiliate Program, which offers access LifeBridge innovation and research resources and the opportunity to work directly with care clinicians and industry experts. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Some Maryland students could return to school in August as legislature moves against Hogan's order

Summer break could end in August this year for some Maryland students after the General Assembly took a significant step Wednesday toward undoing Gov. Larry's Hogan's 2016 order that public schools begin their academic year after Labor Day. The Maryland House of Delegates followed the state Senate in approving a bill returning power to local school boards to decide when the school year begins. The Democratic majority of lawmakers still must reconcile some details of the legislation. But because both chambers passed the legislation by margins large enough to override a Hogan veto, the governor was left with little to counter the latest blow in a years-long political fight over school calendars. (Balt. Sun)

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Attorney General reaches settlement to end 'no poach' hiring agreements in fast food chains

Maryland and other states have reached settlements with four national fast food franchisers to end the use of agreements that stop workers from moving from one franchise to another within the same chain. Maryland reached the settlement to end so-called “no poach” agreements with Dunkin’ Brands, Arby’s, Five Guys Burgers and Fries, and Little Caesars, Attorney General Brian E. Frosh announced. Thirteen states and Washington began an investigation last July over concerns that such agreements hurt low-wage workers by limiting their chances of getting better paying jobs. (Balt. Sun)

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As D.C., N.J. Bet Big on Pro Sports Wagering, Maryland Is Content to Take It Slow

Maryland’s decision to enshrine gambling in its constitution, rather than codify it in law, means it will spend the next couple years on the sidelines when it comes to wagering on professional sports. Officials appear content with the go-slow approach, unconcerned that other states and Washington, D.C., are rushing to take advantage of a recent Supreme Court ruling that allows states to chart their own course. A Senate Budget and Taxation Committee hearing on a measure to legalize betting on professional sports lasted mere moments Wednesday, as the bill’s sponsor — and the panel’s chairwoman — acknowledged that the legislation isn’t going anywhere this session.  (Md. Matters)

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