Amazon exec describes breakdown of future HQ2 workforce

While Amazon has said about half of the 25,000 HQ2 jobs here will be tech-related, we now know a bit more about the breakdown, thanks to a Thursday talk by Ardine Williams, vice president of people operations for the company, to high schoolers. “I can tell you in general, our corporate sites are about half tech and non-tech,” Williams said after a meet-and-greet — and mini recruiting event — with 14 computer science students at Gwynn Park High School in Brandywine. "For HQ2, that’s basically what it’s going to be." (Wash. Bus. Journal)

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Baltimore GM Plant To Close On May 4

The General Motors plant in White Marsh will be closing on May 4. The company recently filed paperwork with the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation that pushed back the plant’s closing. (WJZ-TV)

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Port of Baltimore handles 10.9 million tons of general cargo in 2018, another record year

The port of Baltimore had another historic year in 2018. The Maryland Port Administration’s public terminals handled 10.9 million tons of general cargo — more containers, cars, construction equipment and other cargo than ever before — surpassing 10 million tons for the third straight year, officials announced Wednesday. (Balt. Sun)

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TEDCO generated $1.6B in economic benefits in 2018, study shows

An independent study released Wednesday shows The Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) generates $1.6 billion in economic impact for the state and suppported 7,746 jobs. The study, conducted by Richard Clinch of the University of Baltimore’s Jacob France Institute and Mitch Horowitz of TEConomy Partners, showed significant economic and fiscal returns since its last assessment in 2015. TEDCO’s economic impact included an increase in job creations from 4,358 in 2015 to 7,746 in 2018 as well as a $1B economic impact in 2015 to $1.6 billion in 2018. (Daily Record)

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State chamber opposes letting counties set minimum wage

The Maryland House of Delegates already has approved a bill to raise Maryland’s minimum wage to $15 per hour. As the bill awaits action in the Senate, Del. Neil Parrott attempted Tuesday to interest the House Economic Matters Committee in his bill to let counties set their own minimum wage. “I know we passed one last week, but I’m not sure that’s gonna make it through the Senate,” Parrott, R-Washington, told committee members. “So I think I want to give another option as we look at the minimum wage.” (Herald-Mail)

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Terra Firma expands with new offices in Midwest

Baltimore-based multiregional specialty chemicals distributor Terra Firma announced Wednesday the company will add initial sales offices in Illinois, Ohio and Kentucky in the second quarter of 2019. Company officials said the enhanced coverage is tied to several of its supply partners seeking assistance in the Midwest and Ohio Valley markets. Kevin Trainor was hired as the company’s vice president of sales to lead the Ohio Valley efforts. He brings with him over 32 years of experience, having held several positions of increasing responsibility at Ciba before going to work for The M.F. Cachat Company, where he was northeast regional sales manager and business development manager. (Daily Record)

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After losing contract, background investigation firm displaces 344 workers

After losing a contract, Omniplex World Services, a firm that provides background investigation services to the federal government, said it must terminate 344 people at its Hanover office by May so they can apply for work with the new contractor, a spokeswoman said. The company, a unit of Constellis, a Reston, Virginia-based security services firm, notified the the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation that those workers would lose their jobs April 30. (Balt. Sun)

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'Where do we go?' Baltimore's gay nightlife takes a hit with Grand Central's impending closure

Thursday nights are typically packed at Grand Central, arguably the largest remaining gay nightclub in Baltimore. Patrons pack the club’s dance floor and bar watching fierce lip-synching routines while gulping down $3-vodka drinks amid pulsating music, strobe lights and colorful lasers. “It’s great again,” said Derek Chavis, a 33-year-old Mount Vernon resident. He said Thursday nights at Grand Central remind him what the club was when he first started sneaking in at 19. “It’s been fun to go out and see new faces. That was one thing about Central — you would go out and see people you did not know.” (Balt. Sun)

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