National Aquarium Furloughs 100 Employees, Reduces Salaries After COVID-19 Closure

“In our 40 years, the National Aquarium has never experienced an event of this magnitude, which has led to a planned 6-week closure. As a nonprofit organization that relies heavily on guest revenue, being closed to the public as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to make some very tough decisions. We are closed at a time when we are normally gearing up to welcome hundreds of thousands from around the country. (WJZ)

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$700M Elkton development will 'move dirt' this fall, developer says

The ambitious, $700 million development of hundreds of acres in Elkton is nearing a start despite the novel coronavirus pandemic, the project's developer said on Monday. "Obviously the project has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic," said Ray Jackson, principal of Monkton-based Stonewall Capital, the lead equity partner in the project. "But we’ve been doing everything through teleconferencing and we do have some on-site work going on now. My partners and I are very bullish." (Balt Bus Journal)

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Under Armour will make protective gear for Maryland hospital workers during coronavirus pandemic

Under Armour is making and distributing masks and hospital gowns for health care workers at the University of Maryland Medical System and several other medical facilities in the state. The Baltimore-based sports apparel maker said it is manufacturing medical gear as part of a larger effort to support the state’s medical community during the new coronavirus pandemic. (Balt Sun)

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Kennedy Center stops paying musicians despite $25 million in coronavirus aid

Kennedy Center President Deborah Rutter on Friday informed the National Symphony Orchestra’s 96 musicians that they won’t be paid after April 3 despite receiving a $25 million bailout from the federal government amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to the union that represents the musicians. The one-week notice told musicians that they would not be paid again until the center reopens for business and that they would lose their health care benefits if it remained closed by the end of May, ABC News reported. (Wash Times)

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McCormick hourly workers get pay bump amid COVID-19 crisis

McCormick & Co. Inc. employees reporting to work amid the novel coronavirus pandemic will get a pay raise, the company said Monday. The Hunt Valley-based spice giant said it would increase hourly wages by $2 and extend its paid leave to care for sick family members. McCormick (NYSE: MKC) will also maintain salaries if its spice and flavor production operations are suspended. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Capital One pledges $50M to nonprofits working on food aid, small business assistance

Capital One Financial Corp. (NYSE: COF) has pledged $50 million to support nonprofit partners working in part on food and hunger aid as it continues to ramp up its efforts during the novel coronavirus outbreak. The McLean financial giant has already expanded its use of telework, increasing the number of customer support associates who work from home from 1,600 to 13,000 in two weeks, CEO and co-founder Richard Fairbank said in a message to employees Friday that was then posted online by the bank. (Wash Bus Journal)

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Macy's to furlough majority of its 130,000 workers amid coronavirus

Department store giant Macy's Inc. announced Monday that it will furlough the majority of its workforce of 130,000 as it grapples with the impact of COVID-19, which has ground sales to a halt. Macy's (NYSE: M) made the announcement 13 days after it said it would close all 680 of its physical stores amid the coronavirus outbreak. Those stores will remain closed until the company has a "clear line of sight on when it's safe to reopen," according to a news release. (Wash Bus Journal)

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With hand sanitizer and elbow bumps, real estate agents are still selling during pandemic

Rob Wittman is astonished that in a time of social distancing, real estate agents are holding open houses, allowing inspections and closing sales. “It’s just bothering me — the cavalierness of the agents around me,” said Wittman, a real estate agent who planned to open his own brokerage, NextHome Reach, in early March but instead is sheltering in place because of the coronavirus outbreak. “There are too many [real estate agents] to count bragging about touring houses, their lame protective gear, or their prowess for sales during this crisis.” (Wash Post)

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