Maryland's largest hotel files layoff notice for thousands of employees

The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor filed a layoff notice June 15 affecting its 2,077 employees as the coronavirus pandemic continues to pummel the hospitality industry. The Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) filed with the Maryland Department of Labor lists an effective date of March 11. The Gaylord, Greater Washington's largest hotel at 1,996 rooms, has been closed since March 24, when the owner of all seven Gaylord resort properties across the country suspended operations. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Marc Weller: Port Covington construction restart awaits TIF bond sale

The initial phase of the large-scale redevelopment of Port Covington will not move forward until tax increment financing bonds are sold. Developer Marc Weller offered a status report on the $5.5 billion project in the wake of a June 17 vote by the Board of Estimates to endorse the sale of $148 million in TIF bonds to private investors. "We are excited to resume construction in Port Covington this fall when the TIF bonds go to market," he said through a company spokesman. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Proposal to sell former North Carroll High School, develop sports complex to be considered

Carroll County’s commissioners on Thursday will hear a proposal from a buyer who is interested in turning the former North Carroll High School facility into a sports complex. Capital Sports Group, based in Baltimore, has submitted a proposal to buy the building and grounds of the former school in Hampstead, according to the Board of County Commissioners’ June 25 meeting agenda. A price for the property was not listed on the agenda, but states the buyer seeks to develop a sports complex including outdoor turf fields. (Carr Co Times)

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A Baltimore hospital maintenance director is clearing the air to keep his colleagues safe from coronavirus

Talk about pressure. It’s not really hyperbole to say that the entire state of Maryland has been depending on Richie Stever and his team of maintenance workers to perform their jobs flawlessly. Had there been a slight miscalculation in the way Stever’s crew reversed the air flow — creating negative pressure — in 500 hospital rooms for COVID-19 patients throughout the University of Maryland Medical System, a lot of doctors, nurses, aides, paramedics and cafeteria workers would be at risk of becoming ill with the deadly coronavirus. (Balt Sun)

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$120B federal relief package for independent restaurants could help restaurateurs left behind by PPP

A bipartisan initiative is underway on Capitol Hill to establish a $120 billion relief fund for independent restaurants in the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic. The Real Economic Support That Acknowledges Unique Restaurant Assistance Needed to Survive (RESTAURANTS) Act of 2020 was introduced in the House on June 15 by a bipartisan coalition led by Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore. Accompanying legislation was introduced in the Senate by Sens. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz. (Wash Bus Journal)

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CFG Bank contributes $50K to Boys and Girls Club of Metropolitan Baltimore

CFG Bank, a Baltimore-based owned and operated bank, is contributing $50,000 to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Metropolitan Baltimore to support the city’s youth. The mission of the Boys and Girls Clubs is to enable all young people, especially those who need it most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring and responsible citizens. (Daily Record)

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Maryland’s Ocean City looking to hire thousands

While some businesses have been dealing with a struggle to pay their employees during the pandemic, Ocean City, Maryland, businesses are struggling to find enough employees for the summer season. Many of the businesses in the tourist town rely on foreign students who come to the U.S. on a J-1 work visa each summer. (WTOP)

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With mix of enthusiasm and caution, Baltimore City businesses move to next phase of COVID-19 recovery

On Saturday, as the skies above them alternated between rainy and sunny, the business owners and patrons of Baltimore’s restaurants and stores took additional steps toward the next phase of the city’s reopening. For the city’s many restaurants and bars, which can now open indoor seating at 50% capacity, the news of Phase 2 was a welcome respite from the hits they and their workers had taken over the past months. (Balt Sun)

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