Opposition grows to Maryland Gov. Hogan's public-private partnership plan to build toll lanes in D.C. suburbs

Gov. Larry Hogan is pushing an ambitious and expensive highway project to relieve traffic in the Washington suburbs by enlisting a private company to build and manage toll lanes on the Capital Beltway and Interstate 270. The case for Hogan’s $11 billion plan has won some support among the region’s commuters. By having a private company take on the project, Hogan’s transportation officials say, Maryland will get sorely needed traffic relief without having to pay for it with taxpayer dollars. (Balt. Sun)
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How Maryland imports would be impacted Trump's tariffs on Mexico

If President Donald Trump follows through on his threat to impose tariffs on Mexico, it could have a huge effect on Maryland Trump, a Republican, said Thursday in a tweet that the U.S. will hit Mexican imports with 5 percent tariffs on June 10 if the Mexican government does not stop people from illegally immigrating into the U.S. He said the tariffs will continue to increase until the "illegal immigration problem is remedied." (Balt. Bus. Journal)
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'It feeds my soul': Community of women-owned, first-generation farms growing in Baltimore County

Emma Jagoz, founder of Moon Valley Farm, was not born knowing she was meant to be a farmer. The University of Maryland graduate in American Studies discovered farming eight years ago at age 25, not because it ran in her family but because she wanted to “grow arugula for my baby’s brain.” Pregnant and obsessed with eating healthy, Jagoz read arugula was good for fetal brain development, but got tired of buying bunches of organic arugula at the grocery store. (Balt. Sun)

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Electric Scooter Pilot Program Begins In Montgomery County

Electric scooters have hit the streets in Montgomery County. This weekend, the county began a six-month pilot program in which it will evaluate the use of scooters in several areas. The county already offers both docked and dockless bike shares, including electric bicycles, in the same pilot-test area as the e-scooters. (WJZ-TV)

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Cybersecurity sector continues to heat up

The Washington area has long been a hotbed for cybersecurity talent, owing to a quiet but influential community of hackers, network specialists and software experts serving the U.S. government agencies waging cyberwarfare. That talent base has become the backbone of a fast-growing local industry focused on corporate cyberdefense, which has produced influential local companies including Mandiant, Sourcefire and Tenable. In the past week, that industry has seen a boost. (Wash. Post)

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The future of work: Being a cashier is Maryland's most common occupation, but it's likely vanishing

“I walk in the door and get a wave. He’s known me and my entire family. It’s a very personal experience,” she said. “If there’s several choices, I always come to Lester’s line. He’s fast, quick as can be and he packs everything well.” In the express lane, Steve Finney, 63, stands on a padded mat that helps the soreness in his knees after a long day of checking people out. Working at Graul’s is an after-retirement job for Finney, who had a career at Toys “R” Us and the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks. (Balt. Sun)

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Patapsco Heritage Greenway to host daylong workshop on trails and economic development

The Patapsco Heritage Greenway wasn’t planning to host a trails workshop until next year. But then, said executive director Lindsey Baker, during its annual summit in March, everybody talked about trails. “I think [we had] four different discussions, and every group, no matter what they were ‘supposed to’ be talking about, talked about trails and their connected-ness in the valley,” Baker said. To that end, her organization will be leading a one-day workshop June 11 to focus on the idea of trails as a source of economic development, she said. (Balt. Sun)

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UMMS adopts new conflict-of-interest policy for board members, will bar board leaders from having contracts

The University of Maryland Medical System has adopted a new conflict-of-interest policy that bars it from granting sole-source contracts to board members or their businesses, and precludes it from having any business with certain board leaders. The policy was mandated by a state law passed in the wake of revelations by The Baltimore Sun in March that at least 10 of the hospital network’s 30 board members had contracts with the system, some of which weren’t competitively bid. (Balt. Sun)

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